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^^ 





FOR THE 



d 



mmiiw^^iMm f^m^A^^^^^. 



i 



Istablished 1865. Incorporated 1896. 

JOHN F. FIXKE, President. 
J. A. SCHALK, VIce-Presideut and Gen'l Mgr. L. BURNS, Jr.. Secretary and Treasurer. 



MM MW M unmi MM, 



-SUCCESSORS TO- 



Richard Krotscher. 



Seed Annual 



FOK- 



FROTSCHER CO. CELEBRATED AND RELIABLE GARDEN SEED, 
FOR THE YEAR 1898. 



....DESIGNEtD.... 

To give directions for the cultivation of vegetable as practiced 

in the South. 



SEED ST01RE, 521 to 525 Rfi^ WAJ^EHOUSE 514 to 516 

DUMRIHE STREET. 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 



Though all mail addressed "RICPIARD FK0T8CHER, NEW ORf.EAXS" inu>t be 
delivered to us, please be careful to address us as directed above, aod write your uanie 
and Post Office address plainly. 



XEW ORLEANS, 
D. J. Searcy- Wm. Pfaff, Printers, 

1 89 7. 



Jno. F. Finke, L. Burns, Jr., 

President, Secretary and Treasurer. 

J. A. SCHALCK, 

Vice President and General Manager. 



New Orleans, January ist, 1897. 

IN presenting this catalogue to the public, the undersigned beg to respectfully 
announce that they have succeeded to the large and successful Flower, 
Field and Garden Seed Business, conducted for over thirty years by the late 
Richard Frotscher. 

After a great many years experience in the seed business at New Orleans 
and the vicinity where gardening and truck growing for shipment to the 
uorthern markets has been carried on so extensively for so many years, we are 
prepared to offer to the truck growers of the South, a great many varieties of 
Vegetables which are specialties with us, being the result of much study and 
careful experiment. They are adapted to this climate and will stand long 
shipment much better than the varieties offered by northern houses. 

Mr. J. A Schalck, who has for the last sixteen years been identified with 
the late Mr. Frotscher, as one of the head clerks, and who Mr. Frotscher had 
agreed to make a member of the Frotscher Seed Company which he intended 
to organize in the spring of 1896 had he lived, is now a member of our firm, 
and his wide circle of patrons, as well as the public generally, may depend upon 
his best efforts in their behalf at all times. 

We are further pleased to annoiince that the old force of clerks, with 
Mr. Chas. L. Sieber at the head, also remain with us, and will be pleased to 
w^elcome their friends at the old stand. 

To the old and new friends who have used and will use Frotscher' s Cele- 
brated and Reliable Seeds, wo. diXO: rn2i\drig o^v^ry ^Eort to iuxnish. you with the 
choicest strain of seed at reasonable prices and hope that you will reciprocate by 
lending us a hand in building up such a seed business in the South, as will justify 
us in keeping a full stock of all seeds in demand and keep your dollars at home. 
In buying stock we never lose sight of our Motto: ''The Best is Cheapest.'" 

By strict and prompt attention to the wants of our patrons, we feel confident 
that we can give you satisfaction. Please accept thanks for past favors and the 
compliments of a New Year. 

Yours Truly, 

RICHARD FROTSCHER SEED CO., Limited. 



Our patrons will doubtless be pleased to know that notwithstanding^ 
the hard times, our business is steadily increasing*. 



THB se:ed annual of the 



^Ix^ Xr^^otabl^ Oar-d^xi. 



To truck farmers and professional gardeners we do not deem it necessary to give prac- 
tical advice on vegetable culture, nor do we claim that our practical knowledge is more 
than theirs. However, a few hints on vegetable gardening for the' benefit of our patrons, 
who have not the necessary experience, we think would deserve a place in our 
Garden Manuai.. 

The size of the Vegetable Garden depends entirely upon the purpose for which it is 
intended; whether the family is large or small, and the time which can be devoted to its 
cultivation. The most suitable soil for a garden is alight loam, but our heavy, sometimes 
clay like alluvial soil may be prepared for the purpose by the admixture of such parts as 
are lacking. As a general rule where an excess of humus and undeca^^ed or imperfectly 
decaved vegetable matter is present, lime instead of a fertilizer would be found to be of 
advantage, as by its use nature is materially assisted in decomposing all vegetable matter 
that otherwise would not easily decompose, thereby converting them into a substance 
beneficial as a plant food, while on the other hand destroj'ing the fermentative properties 
of all undecomposed vegetable and animal matter and preventing the soil from getting 
sour. River sand mixed in with heavy and clay soil is of great advantage to the veget- 
able garden, especially when together with well rotted horse manure. 

Manuring depends entirely on the condition of the soil. Stable manure, where it is 
obtainable in a partly decayed condition, is the most reliable. In heavy soil horse manure 
is preferable, while in light and sandy soil cow manure will answer well. For special pur- 
poses Peruvian Guano. Raw Bone, Superphosphate, Nitrate of Soda. Mur'ate of Potash. 
Cotton Seed Meal, and other commercial fertilizers ma)- be used with advantage. Our truck 
farmers have of late used Cow Peas largely as a cheap and very effective fertilizer, with 
excellent results. One and one-half bushel is the usual quantity sown on an acre of land, 
and when large enough they are plowed under. In verj' sandy land Cotton Seed Meal 
ma}' be added to the Cow Peas as an adjuvant, or it may be used alone on quick growing 
crops such as Melons. Cucumbers or Squashes, etc. On Celer}-. soapsuds or dishwater, if 
used as a fertilizer, have awonderful effect, audit is astonishing to perceive the difference 
in size of stalks which were watered every few days with the sues and others on the same 
ground which were not. Wood ashes either used as a top dressing or worked in the ground 
before planting are best for Peas, and coarse Salt or Salt brine for Asparagus. A place ex- 
posed to the East is desirable, but if this cannot be had any other exposure will answer. 
One or more large trees in the garden or near the fence, not enough to render the place 
too shady to grow anything in are of advantage, as their shade can be used to sow Celery. 
Cabbage and Cauliflower during the summer months. The seed beds for this purpose could 
be arranged so as to receive orly the morning and part of the evening sun and be parth^ 
shaded during the middle of the da}'. It is of the greatest importance that the ground 
should be well drained, otherwise it will be impossible to raise good vegetables. The New 
Orleans gardeners raise as fine vegetables as can be grown. 



:o: 



OAK HAVEN SEED FARM. 



On our Trial Grounds, which are under our direct supervision, we will thoroughly 
test the different varieties of seeds as to their vitality^ to know if they will germinate and 
are adapted to our Southern climate, to see if they are prolific, of Fi7ie Quality and True 
to Name, and will experiment in shipping to the Northern market to know what sorts 
bring the highest price and stand handling best. Every test is conducted in as practical a 
manner as possible, and a correct record ofthe result will be kept on file at our office, 
so we will be able to say intelligently what can be done by properly handling our seeds. 

We carry the larg'est and most complete stock o! Flower, Field and 
Garden Seeds o! any house in the South. 



RICHARD PROTSCHBR Snm> CO., Ltd. 



DRAINAG:e AND CUI/TIVATION, 

Go hand in hand, and perhaps there is no investment made for improvement of the farm and garden 
which will return richer reward than that which is expended to secure a good, thorough, comprehen- 
sive system of underground Tile Drainage. 

When completed you at once have a permanent improvement the advantage of which is more appa- 
rent by age because the water finding its way down opens up the pores of the earth relieving it of its 
compactness and stifled condition. Taking away all stagnant water which is so injurious to plant life 
and which is the cause of much blight and disease, and by allowing the air to penetrate, making the land 
from 5 to 10 degrees warmer, and much looser than surface drained lands, allowing nature to do its part 
in transforming sour, heavy alluvial soil into loose mellow gardens which readily respond to the toil be- 
stowed upon them. 

Underground drainage does away with all foul weed breeding ditch banks and turn rows in the mid- 
dle of the field which are such a nuisance when land is drained by opt n surface drains, and the neces- 
sity of bridges are done away with. There is perhaps no cheaper nor more practical means of increas- 
ing the fertility of wet lands than by deep under- drainage, which instead of running all waste which 
will float into the rivers and lakes after heavy rains distributes vegetable-producing matter from the 
earth and from the air along the course the water takes on its way to the tile, inviting plant roots to 
follow, which they do readily, placing them in a position to take up any matter within their reach for 
which they crave. In fact making the whole stratum of soil on a level with the tile available for plant 
growth . 

Experience has also proved that during periods of drouth plants suffer less on well drained lands. 
The soil being looser the moisture is retained longer than on lands which become packed during wet 
weather and baked and cracked by the hot sun of summer, debarrkig the roots from reaching down for 
moisture. 

Good cultivation is as essential in growing crops as fertilizing. Few plants will thrive if not proper- 
ly handled. This is especially true of the finer strains of the different varieties of vegetables. Several 
successive deep plowings should be given to the land in all cases before planting, and if a strata of clay 
underlies the surface s.'.il, sub-soil plowing to get gradually a part of that clay intermingled with the 
top soil is especially beneficial. Heavy soil is best broken up after harvesting the late spring crops 
when the soil is dry enough, and left lay in clods exposed to the action of the sun and subsequent rains, 
when it soon becomes friable and mellow. 

Unde~ no circumstances should the soil be worked when wet, as this is more injurious than benefi- 
cial. While occupied by growing crops, the land should be frequently worked, the surface stirred up as 
often as necessary, and should never be allowed to become baked or crusty. Frequent stirring up of the 
soil, even during dry spells, not only destroys the weeds which are apt to spring up, but also causes the 
soil to absorb more moisture from our damp atmosphei*e and retains it much longer than unworked 
land. The cracking of the soil during dry spells is the result of bad cultivation, or the land having been 
water-soaked. 

A Few Remarks on Raising Vegetables for Shipping. 

During the last few seasons our Truckers who grow largely for shipping to Northern and Western 
markets have not been as successful as before for various reasons. First is over-production, and second 
late frosts. When we note the fact that we have almost the whole country north of us for a market, it 
would seem that over-production is an impossibility', and that paying prices could always be had for all 
our products. But when we take in consideration that some years late frosts either destroy the entire 
crops or retard them to such an extent that our neighbor State Florida gets ahead of us, we must natur- 
ally see the necessity of guarding against such calamities by either building structures heated by other 
means than horse manure, or by protecting our plants in such a manner that freezing is impossible. 

It is of the greatest importance to our truck farmers who grow principally for shipping to be ex- 
tremely careful in selecting not only such varieties of vegetables as bear transportation best andean be 
most profitably grown here, but also in selecting from such only the best and most perfect. Imperfect 
and poorly grown stuff will not even pay transportation costs and should never be shipped. Careful 
culling is also of great importance. We would rather advise to make two grades of the article to be 
shipped and mark them accordingly, than to have the least inferior mixed with what should be strictly 
first class, as it will not take the buyer long to find out the deception. Be sure and have your packages 
neat, no matter whether barrels, cases or crates ; pack your goods tight, using your own style about 
and we ars sure you are bound to make a demand for your products. 

We raise as early Vegetables for shipping" as any other Southern State. 



RICHARD FROTSCHER SEED CO., Ltd. 



Almost every kind of vegetables are shipped from Xew Orleans and vicinity, but Cucumbers, Egg- 
plants, Beans, Peas, Tomatoes, Beets and Potatoesform the bulk. Of Cucumbers, the Xew Orleans market 
are considered the best, as they retain their green color muth longer than any other variety, but the 
Improved White Spine is also good, 

The ;Sew Orleans Market Eggplant is an excellent variety and much demanded up North and West 
on account of its handsome shape and color. It bears transportation well. 

Of Beans, both Bush and Pole, a multitude of varieties are planted, but the Best of AH, Improved 
Yalentine and White Crease Back, or as it is erroneously called here, "Mobile,'" carry especially well. 
The Wax Beans, which are more tender, ship well during a dry season, but in wet weather they are apt 
to rust or spot. 

Tomatoes, owing to our damp atmosphere, are tender and rot too easy to be of any import-ance in 
shipping. 

Beets are largely shipped from here, especially the early kinds. 

Lettuce, especially the Xew Orleans Improved Passien, Trocadero and Large Royal are largely 
planted for shipping, bringing, if well packed, usually good prices. 

An important article is Cabbage, thousands of crates of which are annually shipped from here, and 
it is especially Frenier which supplies the Chicago market. 

Our Gardeners should try and grow vegetables for shipping as early as possible, so as to brings their 
stuff to the market ahead of any other point from which vegetables are shipped and get prices which 
enables them to ship with profit. 

Seeds requisite to produce a given number of Plants and sow a given 

amount of ground. 



Quantity 
per acre. 

Artichoke, 1 oz to 500 plants U lb 

Asparagus, 1 oz to 200 plants 5 lbs 

Barlev - 21^2 bu 

Beans, dwarf, 1 quart to 150 feet of drill 1}4 bu 

Beans, pole, 1 quart to 200 hills 14 bu 

Beet, garden, 1 oz to 100 feet of drill... 10 lbs 

Beet, Mangel, 1 oz to 150 feet of drill 6 lbs 

Broccoli, loz to 8000 plants... 5 oz 

Broom Corn.. 10 lbs 

Brussels Sprouts, loz to 3000 plants 5 oz 

Buckwheat }i bu 

*Cabbage, 1 oz to 3000 plants 5 oz 

Carrot, 1 oz to 250 feet of drill 21/2 lbs 

*Cauliilower. 1 oz to 3000 plants 5 oz 

*Celerv, 1 oz to 10,000 plants 4;oz 

Clover, Alsike and White Dutch 6 lbs 

" Lucerne Large Red & Crimson Tre- 
foil 8 lbs 

'« Medium 10 lbs 

*Collard5, 1 oz to 2,500 plants 6 oz 

Corn, sweet, 1 quart to 500 hills 8 qts 

Cress, 1 oz to 150 feet of drill 8 lbs 

Cucumber. 1 oz to 80 hills.... 1% lbs 

Egg Plantj 1 oz to 2000 plants 3 oz 

Endive, 1 oz to 300 feet of drill S lbs 

Flax, broadcast _. Vi bu 

Gourd, 1 oz to 25 hills 2V2 lbs 

Grass, Blue Kentucky 2 bu 

«• Blue English 1 bu 

" Hungarian and Millet X bu 

" Mixed Lawn 3 bu 

" Orchard. Perennial Rye, Fed Top, 

Fowl Meadow and Wood Meadow... 2 bu 
Garlic, bulbs, 1 lb to 10 feet of drill 

*The above calculations are made for sowing in the spring; during the summer it requires double 

the quantity to give the same amount of plants. 



Quantity 
per acre 

Hemp J4bu 

Kale, 1 oz to 30G0 plants 4 oz 

Kohl-Rabi, 1 oz to 200 feet of drill li;2 lbs 

Leek, 1 oz to 250 feet of drill 4 Iba 

Lettuce, 1 oz to 250 feet of drill _. 3 lbs 

Melon, Musk, 1 oz to 100hill« 1% lbs 

MelcHi, Water, 1 oz to 25 hills l?i lbs 

Nasturtium, 1 oz to 50 feet of drill 10 lbs 

Oats 2}.i bu 

Oki-a,loz toSOfeetof drill 10 lbs 

Onion Seed, 1 oz to 200 feet of drilL 4 lbs 

" " for transpJajitrng 2 lbs 

for Sets 3«lb& 

Onion Sets. 1 quart to 20 feet of (fa-ill 8 bu 

Parsnip, 1 ©z to 250 feet of drill. 5 lbs 

Parsley, 1 oz to 250 feet of drill 8 lbs 

Jbeas, garden, 1' quart to 150 feet of drill l^i bu 

•' field 2K bu 

Pepper, 1 oz to 1.500 plants 4 oz 

Potatoes 10 Du 

Pumpkin, 1 quart to 300 hills - 4 qts 

Radish, 1 oz to 150 feet ef drill 8 lbs 

Rve 1>2 bu 

Salisfv, 1 oz to 60 f eet of drill 8 lbs 

Spinach, 1 oz to 150 feet of drill 10 lbs 

Summer Savory, 1 oz to 500 feet of drill 2 lbs 

Squash, summer, 1 oz to 40 hilla. -. 2 lbs 

winter, 1 oz to 10 hills 3 lbs 

Tomato, 1 oz to 3000 plants 3 oz 

Tobacco, 1 oz to 5000 plants. -- 2 oz 

Turnip, loz to 250 feet of drill 1.^-2 lt)S 

Vetches - ^^ 

Wheat 1 to 2 bu 



Dis. apart. No. Plants. Dis. apart. No. Plants 
foot 174,240 3 feet by 3 feet 4,840 



Number of Plants or Trees to the Acre at given distances. 

Dis. apart. No. Plants. 

]2feet 302 

15 feet 193 

18 feet 134 

20 feet 108 

25 feet 69 

30 feet 49 



1 foot 43,5604 

11/2 feet 19,3604 

2 feet 10,890 4 

2>i feet 6,969'4 

3feetbv 1 foot 14,5205 

3 feet bv 2 feet 7,260| 



Ifoot 10,888 

2 feet 5,444 

3 feet 3,629 

4 feet 2,722 

5 feet 1,742 



[Dis. apart. No. Plants. 
] 6 feet 1,210 

I 7 feet -. 889 

8 feet 680 

9 feet 573 

10 feet^-. 435 \ 

II feet 360 j 



If you do not Find Listed what you want in Nursery stock write us. 



ist Month. 



JANUARY. 



31 Days. 



Calculated for the I/atitude of the Southern States. 



New Moon 3d. Oh. 

First Quarter lOd. Hh. 



3m. Mor. 
46m. After. 



■__*~tt--^ f-i ^g^ rf~> ^gi 

1 Full Moon... * 18d. 2h. 17m. After. 

I Last Quarter 25d. 2h. 8m. After- 



Day of Month and Week. 



1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 

10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
IG 



Friday, 

Saturday, 

Sunday, 

Monday, 

Tuesday, 

Wednesday, 

Thursday, 

Friday, 

Saturday, 

Sunday, 

Monday, 

Tuesday, 

Wednesday, 

Thursday, 

Friday, 

Saturday, 



Sun 


Sun 


rises 


sets 


b. m. 


h. ni. 


G 56 


5 12 


6 57 


5 13 


6 57 


5 U 


6 57 


5 15 


G 57 


5 15 


6 57 


5 IG 


G 57 


5 17 


6 57 


5 18 


G 57 


5 18 


G 57 


5 19 


6 57 


5 20 


G 57 


5 21 


6 57 


5 22 


6 57 


5 23 


6 57 


5 24 


G 57 


5 24 



Moon 
r. &s. 
h, 



m. 



5 28 
G 30 
sets 
G 54 

7 58 

8 58 

9 54 

10 47 

11 42 
morn 

36 

1 32 



Day of Month and Week. 



27 
24 
22 
17 



17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
^3 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 



Sunday, 

Monday, 

Tuesday 

Wednesday, 

Thursday, 

Friday, 

Saturday, 

Sunday, 

Monday, 

Tuesday, 

Wednesday, 

Thursday, 

Friday, 

Saturday, 

Sunday, 



un 


Sun 


rises 


sets 


h. m. 


h. m. 


'» 56 


5 25 


6 56 


5 26 


6 56 


5 27 


6 55 


5 28 


6 55 


5 29 


6 55 


5 29 


6 54 


5 30 


6 54 


5 31 


6 54 


5 32 


6 53 


5 33 


G 53 


5 34 


G 52 


5 35 


6 52 


5 36 


6 51 


5 37 


6 51 


5 37 



Moon 
r. & 8. 
h. m. 




10 47 

11 53 
morn 

1 1 



9 

16 
19 



5 16 

6 4 



Land should be prepared to sow for an early Spring Crop, Spinach, Mustard, Carrots, 
Beets, Turnips, Leeks, etc. Also all Early varieties of Radish may be sown during this 
month, the Black Spanish, White California Mammoth and Chinese Rose for a late crop. 

Sow Lettuce, the FroLscher Company's Early Market may be considered the best for 
early sowing, Endive, Escarolle. Cabbage for a late Spring and Early Summer crop, espe- 
cially Finke's Succession and Finke's Pride of the South, Broccoli, Kohlrabi and Extra 
Early Cauliflower. 

It is best to sow all in a cold frame and protect against the changeable weather. Cress, 
Chervil, Parsley and Soup Celery should be sown, also, Roquette and Sorrel. Prepare hot 
beds, if this has not been done during the previous month, to sow for early transplanting. 
New Orleans Market Egg Plant, Pepper and towards the middle of the month Tomatoes. 

Sow Sweet and Medicinal Herbs at the beginning of the month, so as to get them 
strong enough and well established before hot weather sets in. 

For a general crop Peas of all kinds maybe planted now; the later varieties, such as 
Black-eyed and White Marrowfat, Champion of England, Eugenie, Strategem and Tele- 
phone, first, and towards the end of the month the Extra Early and Early varieties like 
Frotscher Company First and Best, Extra Early , Little Gem, and Alaska. 

Shallots should be transplanted and divided. Set out Cabbage and Cauliflower 
plants sown in November and December. 

Onion plants which have not been set out last month must be set out now if they are 
expected to bulb, if they are not too thick in the seed bed, we would advise to thin them 
out tea proper stand, and set out those that had to be pulled up. 

Set out Asparagus roots and sow the seed of that vegetable during this month in well 
prepared beds; work up the established Asparagus beds and dig in the manure which had 
been put on as a top dressing in autumn. 

Cucumbers for forcing may be planted now. The best plan is to plant the seed in 
flower pots which should be placed in a hot bed as near the glass as possible, now have 
another hot bed ready and when the young plants in the pots have the first rough leaves 
plant in this bed. For shipping cucumbers are generally planted by our gardeners here in 
the month of December, or sometimes as early as November, but those planted in January 
come nearly as early and bear more. IN THE FIELD 

Potatoes should be planted during this month. The late and second early varieties 
such as Peerless, Rural New Yorker, White Elephant, etc., first, and the early varieties 
like Early Rose towards the end of the month. 

Sow Texas Red and Turf Oats, also Mangel Wurzel and Sugar Beets for stock food. 

IN THE ORCHARD. 

Fruit Trees of all kinds, such as Pears, Plums, Peach, Apple, Pecan and Orange Trees 
may be set out. Citrus trifoliata and Pecans for stools to bud upon should be sown now. 
The sooner Pecan nuts are sown the better they come up. 

IN THE FLOWER GARDEN. 

Continue to sow Flower Seeds for Spring and early Summer blooming. 



2nd Month. 



FKBRUARY. 



28 Days. 



Calculated for the I/atitude of tlie Southern States. 


New Moon 

First Quarter 


lo. 2h. 13m, After. Full Moon 17d. 

9d. Ih. 25m. After. Last Quarter 23d. 


4h. 
9h. 


llua. 
i3m. 


Morn. 
After. 







Sun 


Sun 


Moon. 






Sun 


Sun 


Moon. 


Day of month and week. 


rises. 


sets. 


r &s. 


Day of month and week. 


rises. 


sets. 


r. &s. 




h, m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 






h. m. 


h. m. 


h. ni. 


1 


Monday 


6 50 


5 38 


sets 


15 


Monday 


6 39 


5 50 


5 27 


2 


Tuesday 


6 50 


5 39 


6 41 


16 


Tuesday 


6 39 


5 50 


6 5 


3 


Wedoesd.'iy 


6 49 


5 40 


7 41 


17 


Wednesday 


6 38 


5 51 


rises 


4 


Thnrsduy 


6 48 


5 41 


8 36 


18 


Thursday 


6 37 


5 52 


7 29 


5 


Friday 


6 48 


5 41 


9 31 


19 


Friday 


6 36 


5 53 


8 34 


6 


Saturday 


6 47 


5 42 


10 25 


20 


Saturday 


6 35 


5 53 


9 42 


7 


Sunday 


6 46 


5 43 


11 21 


21 


Sunday 


6 34 


5 54 


10 52 


8 


Monday 


6 46 


5 44 


morn 


22 


Monday 


6 33 


5 55 


morn 


9 


Tuesday 


6 45 


5 45 


16 


23 


Tuesday 


6 32 


5 56 


1 


10 


Wednesday 


G 44 


5 46 


1 13 


•24 


Wednesday 


6 31 


5 56 


1 9 


11 


Thursday 


6 43 


5 46 


2 10 


25 


Thursday 


6 30 


5 57 


2 13 


12 


Friday 


6 42 


5 47 


3 5 


26 


Friday 


6 29 


5 58 


3 10 


13 


Saturday 


6 41 


5 48 


3 57 


27 


Saturday 


6 28 


5 5S 


4 


14 


Sunday 


6 40 


5 49 


4 45 


28 


Sunday 


6 27 


5 59 


4 43 



All varieties of winter vegetables may be sown yet such as Spinach, Mustard. Carrots, 
Beets, Parsnips and Leeks, also all varieties of Radishes, White Spring and Purple Top 
Turnip, Kohlrabi, Swiss Chard, Lettuce, White Royal and Frotscher Company's Early 
Market; Early Cabbage and Extra Early Cauliflower. Of the latter the Extra Early Paris 
and Snowball may be considered the best varieties and will generally succeed well if the 
month of April is dry and not too warm. 

Transplant Cauliflower and Cabbage plants and divide and set out Shallots again. Sow 
Roquette, Sorrel, Chervil, Parsley, Cress and Celery for seasoning if not done last month. 

Peas of all varieties except the later ones like the Marrowfat, etc. can be planted dur- 
ing this month, the Early and Extra Early varieties will do excellent if planted now. If 
February is mild Early varieties of Bush Beans — The Frotscher Company's Extra Early Re- 
fugee and Early Mohawk are the best — may be planted towards 'che end of the month in 
sheltered places or near the fences where in case of necessity they could be protected 
against late frosts. 

After the middle of this month some Early Corn can be planted for market use. Adam's 
Extra Early, Large Adam's and Early White Flint are considered the best of the Early 
varieties. For Family use, the Sugar varieties are preferable, but as they are more tender 
we would advise not to plant them before March. 

Sow yet Sweet Herbs of all kinds, the most tender varieties in a cold frame so they 
may be sheltered during rough weather, they may be transplanted into the open ground 
afterwards. 

Some Gardeners venture to sow at the end of this month New Orleans Market Cucum- 
bers, Squash and Melons, protecting them by means of all small glass covered boxes; they 
often succeed well if the weather is not too extremely severe. 

The hotbeds, owing to the changeable weather, require a good deal of attention and 
must be closely watched On warm and sunny days plenty of air should be given to pre- 
vent plants from getting spindly and damping off. Be careful to close the sashes early 
enough in the evening so that some of the warmth remains in the beds. Have plenty of 
covering on hand so as to cover the sashes during cold nights. 

Onion seeds, to raise sets have to be sown at the early part of this month. They 
should be sown thick in drills, about 30 lbs to the acre in land completely free of weeds, 
and especially of Cocoa. 

Sow Asparagus seed in drills, as this is the best month, also set out the roots of this 
vegetable. IN THE FIELD 

Continue to plant Potatoes, for a general crop. February may be considered the best 
month, they will do better and yield more if planted in this than in any other month. 
Mangel Wurzel and Sugar Beets for stock food may yet be sown. 

Sweet Potatoes can belaid in abed for sprouting, so as to have early slips. IN THE 
ORCHARD 

Set out Fruit Trees of all kinds, especially Orange and Pecan Trees. Sow yet Pecan nuts 
and Citrus trifoliata seeds to raise stock. IN THE FLOWER GARDEN 

Sow Flower seeds for late Spring and Early Summer blooming under glass, such as 
Zinnias, Balsams, Torenia, the different varieties of Amaranths and Gomphreuas, etc. 



3rd Month. 



MARCH. 



31 Days. 



Calculated for the I<atitude of the Southern States. 



New Moon 3d. 

First Quarter lid. 



6h. 56m. Mor. I Full Moon 18d. 

9h. 28m. Mor. | Last Quarter 25d. 



3h, 28m. After. 
6h. Om. Mor. 





Snn 


Si 


iin 


Moon 






Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


Day of Month ond Week, 


rises. 


sets. 


r. & s. 


Day of Month and Week. 


rises. 


sets. 


r. &8. 




n. m- 


h. 


m. 


h. m. 






h. m. 


h* m. 


h. m. 


1 


Monday 


6 26 


6 





5 18 


17 


Wednesday 


6 7 


6 10 


5 9 


2 


Tuesday- 


6 25 


6 





5 50 


18 


Thursday 


6 6 


6 11 


rises 


3 


Wednesday 


6 23 


6 


1 


sets 


19 


Friday 


6 5 


6 11 


7 24 


4 


Thursday 


6 22 


6 


2 


7 19 


20 


Saturday 


6 4 


6 12 


8 35 


5 


Friday 


6 21 


6 


2 


8 14 


21 


Sunday 


6 2 


6 12 


9 46 


6 


Saturday 


6 20 


6 


8 


9 10 


22 


Monday 


6 1 


6 13 


10 57 


7 


Sunday 


6 19 


6 


4 


10 6 


23 


Tuesday 


6 


6 14 


morn 


8 


Monday 


6 18 


6 


4 


11 2 


24 


Wednesday 


5 58 


6 14 


4 


9 


Tuesday 


6 16 


6 


5 


11 58 


25 


Thursday 


5 57 


6 15 


1 5 


10 


Wednesday 


6 15 


6 


6 


morn 


26 


Friday 


5 56 


6 15 


1 57 


11 


Thursday 


6 14 


6 


6 


53 


27 


Saturday 


5 54 


L 6 16 


2 42 


12 


Friday 


6 13 


6 


7 


1 46 


28 


Sunday 


5 53 


6 17 


3 21 


13 


Saturday 


6 12 


6 


8 


2 34 


29 


Monday 


5 52 


6 17 


3 53 


U 


Sunday 


6 11 


6 


8 


3 18 


30 


Tuesday 


5 51 


6 18 


4 22 


15 


Monday 


6 9 


6 


9 


3 59 


31 


Wednesday 


5 50 


6 18 


4 50 


16 


Tuesday 


6 8 


6 


9 


4 35 













IN THE VEGETABI.E GARDEN. 

Sow in the early part of March, Beets, Carrots, Radishes, Spinach, Swiss Chard, Let- 
tuce, Leeks, Early Cabbage, Kohlrabi and Mustard; also Soup Celery for cutting, Parsley, 
Roquette, Cress and Chervil. Near the end of the month sow Endive and Escarolle. 

The best Lettuce for this time is the Royal Cabbage head, Frotscher Company's Early 
Market, The Drumhead, Perpignan and White Paris Coss are also excellent spring varie- 
ties and especially the latter is a favorite market sort. The Butterhead if sown after the 
middle of February will run into seed in our climate. 

All varieties of Bush and Pole Beans principally Frotscher Company's Extra Early Re- 
fugee, Wardwell's Kidney Wax, Dwarf Flageolet or Perfection Wax, White Creaseback 
Pole, Golden Wax Flageolet and Lazy Wife's, can be planted in this month. With Lima 
and Sewee Beans, we would advise to wait until the end of the month as they are very apt 
to rot if the ground is not warm enough. 

Plant Squash, Cucumbers, Melons and Okra in the open ground, and if the weather 
permits, set out Tomato, Eggplant and Pepper plants for an early crop, and sow seed of 
these for later planting. Of Melons, try our New Orleans Market Canteloupe. the Frotscher 
Company's Preserving Citron, Florida's Favorite, Saccharine Beauty and Frotscher Com- 
pany's Gem. Plant Sugar Corn for the Market and family use. Our Gardeners here 
plant no Sugar Corn for the market, relying principally on Adams Early. White St. 
Charles, Rockc^ale, Champion White Pearl and other Field varieties, yet there is no bet- 
ter table variety than Stowell's Evergreen Sugar. IN THE FIELD 

in the first half of this month Potatoes may still be planted and will yield well if the 
weather is favorable. In fact we have seen the finest crop raisp^d from Potatoes planted 
on the 15th of this month. 

Sow Lespedeza at the beginning of March and towards the end Sorghum, Kaffir Corn, 
Giant Beggar Weed, Teosinte and Milo Maize for stock food. Plant Sweet Potatoes 
to raise slips from for the general crop. IN THE ORCHARD 

little can be done during this month beyond keeping the grass off and mulching newly 
planted trees. Sometimes when the season is retarded, Trees may be- set out the first 
half of the month. IN THE FLOWER GARDEN 

all Summer bloomers may be sown during March. Plant Dahlia, Gladiolus and Tube- 
rose Bulbs and set out Chrysanthemums for fall blooming. 



Our assortment of Flower Seeds and Flowering" Bulbs, suitable for our 
Southern climate, is the best that can be found. 



4th Month. 



APRIL.. 

Calculated for tlie I/atitude of the Southerti States. 



^o Days, 



JVIooio.'^ JE=*lr».^^^s, 



Xew Moon 

First Quarter. 



. Id. 

lOd. 



lOh. 
2h. 



24m. 
27m. 



After. 
Morn. 



Full Moon 17d. 

Last Quarter 23d. 







Sun '■ 


Day of Month and Week^ 


rises. : 






h. m. 


1 


Thursday 


5 49 


2 


Friday 


5 48 


3 


Saturday 


5 46 


4 


Sunday 


n 45 ! 


5 


Monday 


5 44 


6 


Tuesdaj- - 


5 43 


7 


Wednesday 


5 41 


8 


Thursday 


5 41 


9 


Friday 


5 39 


10 


Saturday 


5 38 


11 


Sunday 


5 37 


12 


Monday 


5 36 


13 


Tuesday 


5 35 


14 


Wednesday 


5 34 


l.T 


1'hursday 


5 33 



Sun 
sets. 



6 19 
6 20 
6 20 
6 21 
6 21 
6 22 
6 23 
6 23 
6 24 
6 24 
25 
6 26 
6 26 
6 27 
6 27 



Moon 

r. &s. 
h, m. 



Day of Month and Week. 



Oh. 25ni. Morn. 
JJh. 48ra. After, 



Moon 
r. As- 
h. m. 



5 19 
sets 

7 58 

8 54 

9 50 

10 45 

11 38 
morn 

27 

1 13 

1 54 

2 30 

3 4 

3 37 

4 11 



16 
17. 

il8' 
19 
20 

I 21. 
22 

123 
24 

;^5 

126 
27 

I 28. 
:29 

::?o 



Friday 

Saturday 

Sunday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 

Sunday 

Monday 

Tuesda}^ 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 



Sun 


Sun 


rises. 


sets. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


5 32 


6 28 


5 30 


6 29 


5 29 


6 29 


5 28 


6 30 


5 27 


6 31 


5 26 


6 31 


5 25 


6 32 


5 24 


6 32 i 


5 23 


6 33 


5 22 


6 34 


5 21 


6 34 


5 20 


6 35 


5 20 


6 35 


5 19 


6 36 


5 18 


6 37 



4 46 
rises 

8 35 

9 49 

10 54 

11 51 
morn 
40 



21 
54 
25 



2 54 

3 21 

3 49 

4 18 



Keep the beds occupied by growing plants \yell worked up and clean of weeds. Plant 
yet for a summer crop Bush. Pole and Lima Beans, especially the Southeru WlUow- 
ieayed. Sweet Corn, Cucumbers. Squash, Melons and Okra: also Beets, Carrots. Swiss 
Chard. Eadishes. Lettuce, Mustard, Endiye, Roquette, Cress, Parsley Chervil and Celery 
for cutting. 

For a later crop sow in the open ground Eggplants. Tomatoes and Peppers. Set out 
plants of these yarieties of vegetable and replant those which were set out last month and 
failed, to grow, owing to unfavorable weather. 

It is rather late to sow Cabbage seed now:still some of the early pointed varieties may 
be sown yet. Kohlrabi's if sown during this month must not be transplanted, otherwise 
they will run into seed. It is best to sow in drills and thin them out to a proper stand af- 
terwards. 

4t the latter part of this month begin sowing the Late Italian Giaut Caulitiower: 
this vatiety takes from eight to niae months to uiature and, therefore, should be sown 
early. It is necessary to make several sowings, so that in case one should fail the other 
would be coming on. 

The Italian Caulitiovver is hardier than the French and German varieties and is less 
attacked by insects, stiil the plants have to be closely watched and all green Cabbage 
worms and other insects removed. 

A good plan is to sow the seed in boxes elevated two or three feet above the ground. 
These boxes should be provided with a frame on which during heavy shovrers a sort of a 
cover may be laid to protect the young plants. A free application of Tobacco Dust in the 
evening will keep the insects off." IX THE FIELD. 

Plant Sweet Potato slips for an early crop, dig Irish Potatoes planted early and pre- 
pare the the land well to plant Corn either for the market or stock food. 

Plant Cashaw. Cheese and Field Pumpkius. especially eur new variety : the Frotscher 
Company's Mammoth Long Pumpkin, for size, firmness of flesh, etc.. it cannot be excelled. 

German Millet should be sown this mouth: also all varieties of SoTghum, Katiir and 
Dhouro Corn. Millo Maize and Giant Beggar Weed for stock food. 

German Millet is an excellent forage plant and should be planted by evers farmer 
and planter. Before sowing the ground should b? well prepared, that is well plowed 
and harrowed, so as to get the surface fine and mellow. 

Three pecks of seed is the quantity required to sow an acre. 

The ground, after sowing the seed, should be well rolled and the seeds requires no 
further covering: but if no roller is handy, some brush tied together and passed over the 
newly sown field will cover the seed effectively. For hav, Millet should be cut when in 
bloom. THE FLOWER GARDEN requires close attention. Plants, such as Zinias, Bal- 
sams, Torenias. Amaranths and Dahlias, sown last month, should be transplanted now, and 
others sown for later blooming. Set out Chrysanthemums yet for fall blooming, plant 
Dahlia Bulbs, Gladiolus and Tuberoses. 



5tli Month. 



MAY. 



31 Days, 



Calculated for the I^atitude of the Southern States. 



New Moon lo. 

First Quarter 9d. 

Full Moon 16d. 



2h, 46m. After. I Last Quarter... 23d, 

3h. 37m. After. | New Moon 31d. 

7h. 54ni. Morn. | 



3h. 34m. After, 
6h. 25m. Morn 



Day of month and week. 



] 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

13 

12 

13 

14 

15 



Saturday 

Sunday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 

Sunday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 



Sun 
rises. 
h. m. 



5 17 
5 i6 
5 15 
5 14 
5 13 
5 12 



12 
11 
10 
9 
9 
8 
7 
7 
6 



Sun 

sets. 
h* m. 

(5 37 
6 38 
6 39 
G 39 
6 40 
6 41 
6 41 
6 42 
6 43 
6 43 
6 44 
6 45 
6 45 
6 46 
6 46 



Moon. 

r &s. 
h. m. 



4 


49 


sets 


8 


40 


9 


33 


10 


23 


11 


8 


11 


51 


OQorn 





28 


1 


2 


1 


34 


2 


7 


2 


41 


3 


17 


3 


56 



Day of month and week. 



16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 



Sunday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Fridaj^ 

Saturday 

Sunday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 

Sunday 

Monday 



Sun 


Sun 


Moou. 


rises. 


sets. 


r. &s. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


5 5 


6 47 


rises 


5 5 


6 48 


8 34 


5 4 


6 48 


9 38 


5 3 


6 49 


10 32 


5 3 


6 49 


11 17 


5 3 


6 50 


11 54 


5 2 


6 51 


morn 


5 2 


6 51 


27 


5 2 


6 52 


56 


5 2 


6 53 


1 24 


5 1 


6 53 


1 52 


5 I 


6 54 


2 20 


5 


6 54 


2 51 


5 


6 55 


3 26 


5 


6 55 


4 2 


4 59 


6 56 


sets 



In May very little sowing is done. The ground is occupied in growing crops which 
require a good deal of attention. In the 

VEGETABLE GARDEN 

a few articles, such as Yellow and White Summer Radish, Endive and Lettuce 
may be sown. Lettuce, if sown now requires a good deal of attention and must be freely 
watered. If neglected it soon becomes hard and tasteless. To raise good Lettuce dur- 
ing the summer months is connected with a good deal of labor and trouble, and but few 
varieties will succeed here. The best varieties are the Large Royal or New Orleans 
Market and Perpignam. 

Celery — Large White Solid, Dwarf Large Ribbed and Golden Self Blanching may be 
sown in the latter part of the month, but it is necessary to shade and keep it, especially 
during the dry weather, regularly moist. 

Sow Late Italian Cauliflower in well prepared beds. 

Besides Creole Cabbage, no other variety can be sown. The Creole will stand the 
heat better than any other variety, but seldom forms solidheads and runs easily to seed. 
Continue to plant Lima and other Pole Beans. The Southern Prolitic may be considered 
the best for late planting. 

Shallots which ripen during the month, must be taken up as soon as the tops are 
dry. It is best to expose the bulbs to the sun for a few days, and then store thetn away 
in a dry, airy plaoe, taking care not to lay them too thick, as they are liable to heat. In 
the 

FIELD. 

Plant Corn yet for a late crop. The Yellow Creole variety is one of the hardiest and 
best. Sow Millet and Soighum for stock feed, especially Sorghum, which, v,i it resists 
consideiable drouth, will do fairly well. Plant Sweet Potato slips for late crop. 

Between the Corn, Crowders and other Field Peas maybe planted, or Crowders may 
be planted in rows for green use. 

Sow Cow Peas for fertilizing purposes; one bushel per acre should be used and 
plowed under when the ground is well covered with vines. They may also be allowed to 
remain in the field until they are ripe and begin to decay and then turn under. However 
it is the most advantageous to plow them down when they have the most foliage, that is, 
while they are blooming, as they then contain the most fertilizing properties. 

Cow Peas may be considered the cheapest and most beneficial fertilizer for worn out 
Jand. I>^ THE ORCHARD 

very little can be done during this month. If ripe wood can be obtained and the stools 
have sufficient sap, budding may be attempted in the nursery, but it is best to wait unti 1 
next month. IN THE FLOWER GARDEN. 

Keep on sowing summer blooming annuals to replace those which have done 
blooming. 



6th Montii. 



JUNE. 



;o Days. 



Calculated for the I/atitude of the Southern States. 



JVIoox:^.'® I*l:i^:se>s# 



First Quarter 8d. lli. 2m. Mor. 

Full Moon 14d. 3h, Im, After. 



Last Quarter -... 21d, 

New Moon 29d. 



5b. 24m. After- 
8h. 55m. After^ 







Sun 


Sun 


Moon 






Sun 


&un 


Moon 


Day of Month and Week, 


rises. 


sets. 


r. & s. 


Day of Month and Week. 


rises. 


sets. 


r. &s. 




h. m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 






h. na. 


h. 


m. 


h. m. 


1 


Tuesday- 


4 59 


6 56 


8 20 


16 


Wednesday 


4 58 


7 


3 


9 7 


2 


Wednesday 


4 59 


6 57 


9 6 


17 


Thursday 


4 59 


7 


3 


9 50 


3 


Thursday 


4 59 


6 57 


9 50 


18 


Friday 


4 59 


7 


3 


10 25 


A 


Friday 


4 59 


6 58 


10 29 1 


19 


Saturday 


4 59 


7 


3 


10 56 


5 


Saturday 


-4 58 


6 58 


11 3 


20 


Sunday 


4 59 


7 


4 


11 26 


6 


Sunday- 


4-58 


6 59 


11 35 


21 


Monday 


4 59 


7 


4 


11 54 


7 


Monday 


4 58 


6 5.i 


Qiorn 


22 


Tuesday 


5 


7 


4 


morn 


8 


Tuesday 


4 58 


7 


6 


23 


Wednesday 


5 


7 


4 


22 


9 


Wednesday 


4 58 


7 


37 


24 


Thursday 


5 


7 


4 


51 


10 


Thursday 


4 58 


7 1 


1 11 


25 


Friday 


5 


7 


4 


1 24 


11 


Friday 


4 58 


7 1 


1 49 


26 


Saturday 


5 1 


7 


4 


2 2 


12 


Saturday 


4 58 


7 1 


2 33 


27 


Sunday 


5 1 


7 


5 


2 44 


13 


Sunday 


4 58 


7 2 


3 23 


28 


Monday 


5 1 


7 


5 


3 31 


14 


Monday 


4 58 


7 2 


rises 


29 


Tuesday 


5 2 


7 


5 


4 22 


15' Tuesday 


4 58 


7 2 


8 16 


:50 


Wednesday 


5 2 


7 


5 


sets 



THE VEGETABLE GARDEN", 
which is now fairly stocked with growing crops requires looking after. 

Eggplants, Tomatoes and Peppers, which are now bearing must during dry weather 
be regularl7 watered to keep them in a bearing condition. 

Corn may be planted yet for the last supply ©f roasting ears, also some Water and 
Musk Melon, especially such hardy varieties as the Saccharine Beauty, Frotscher Com- 
pany's Gem, and New Orleans Market Canteloupe. Cucumbers, Squash and Pumpkins, 
especially field varieties if planted during this month will generally do well, but they 
require, if the weather is hot and dry, a liberal supply of water. Sow White and Yellow 
Summer Radish, Endive and Celery; the latter has to be shaded. 

Southern Prolific Pole Beans, it planted during this month will keep in bearing al- 
most until frost; they are the hardiest for summer planting. 

Sow yet Late Italian Giant Cauliflower, and at the end of the mouth the Early Giant. 
Some cultivators transplant Cauliflowers from the bed direct in the open ground, others 
again plant them first into flower pots and when v/ell rooted transplant in the beds, we 
recommend the former practice as being the easiest and less laborious. 

Cabbage seed, if sown during the latter part of this month will form a better stand 
than if sown in July, but as the plants get too large before there is a chance to set them 
out, it is not advisable. 

Sow Large Royal, Frotscher Company's Early Market and Perpignan Lettuce dur- 
ing this month. To sow Lettuce seed during the summer months requires a good deal 
of attention and is connected with more labor than most people are willing to bestow. 

Before sowing the seeds should be soaked for at least half an hour in water until the 
grains fall to ihe bottom of the vessel. They should he taken out, put in a piece of cloth 
and placed in a cool place, under the cistern for instance, or if convenient, in an ice box. 
The cloth has to be kept moist, but not too wet, as the seed is apt to rot before it has a 
chance to germinate. In from 24 to 36 hours the little sprouts or radicles will make their 
appearance and the seed has to be carefully sown and kept moist until the plants are up 
and fairly well started. In order to sow it nice and even the sprouted seed may be mixed 
with dry sand or soil, and we would advise to sow if possible in the evening as it gets 
better started than if sown during the day. 

If Lettuce seed is sown without being sprouted the ants will carry it away before it 
germinates, and the Seeds-man is blamed for selling seeds which failed to come up. This 
germinating has to be done from May to October, or as long as the hot weather lasts. 
Sow Tomatoes for a late fall crop. IN THE FIELD. 

Continue to sow Cow Peas for fertilizing and plant yet Sweet Potato slips. 

IN THE ORCHARD. 

Keep down the weeds around the young trees, and pay particular attention to scales 
and other insect pests, Start in budding Orange and other fruit trees. 

THE FLOWER GARDEN. 

Little sowing can be done during this month, except perhaps Zinnias, Balsams, Gom- 
phrenas, Cockscombs and Vincas. 



7th Month. 



JULV- 



31 Days. 



Calculated for the I/atitude of the Southern States. 



First Quarter 7d. 

Full Moon ISd. 



7h. 32m. Morn, 1 Last Quarter 21d. 

lOh. 5201. After. New Moon 29d. 



9h. 8 m. Morn. 
9h. 58m. Morn 





Sun 


Sun 


Moon. . 






Sun 


Sun 


Moon. 


Day of month and week. 


rises. 


sets. 


r &s. 


Day of month and week. 


rises. 


sets. 


r. & s. 




h. 


m. 


h- 


m. 


h. m. 






h. m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


1 


Thursday 


5 


2 


7 


5 


8 29 


17 


Saturday 


5 10 


7 1 


9 24 


2 


Friday 


5 


3 


7 





9 4 


18 


Sunday 


5 11 


7 1 


9 54 


3 


Saturday 





3 


7 





9 36 


19 


Monday 


5 11 


7 


10 23 


4 


Sunday 


5 


4 


7 


5 


10 8 


20 


Tuesday 


5 12 


7 


10 52 


5 


Monday 


5 


4 


7 





10 40 


21 


Wednesday 


5 12 


6 59 


11 23 


6 


Tuesday 


5 


5 


7 


4 


11 12 


22 


Thursday 


5 13 


6 59 


11 59 


7 


Wednesday 


5 





7 


4 


11 47 


23 


Friday 


5 13 


6 58 


morn 


8 


Thursday 


5 





7 


4 


morn 


24 


Saturday 


5 14 


6 58 


38 


9 


Fridav 


5 


6 


7 


4 


25 


25 


Sunday 


5 15 


6 57 


1 22 


10 


Saturday 





6 


7 


4 


1 12 


26 


Monday 


5 15 


6 57 


2 13 


11 


Sunday 


5 


7 


7 


4 


2 7 


27 


Tuesday 


5 16 


6 56 


3 9 


12 


Monday 





. 7 


7 


3 


3 9 


28 


Wednesday 


5 16 


6 55 


4 8 


13 


Tuesday 


5 


8 


7 


3 


4 17 


29 


Thursday 


5 17 


6 55 


sets 


14 


Wednesday 


5 


9 


7 


2 


rises 


30 


Friday 


5 17 


6 54 


7 39 


15 


Thursday 


5 


9 


7 


2 


8 20 


31 


Saturday 


5 18 


6 53 


8 11 


16 


Friday 


5 


10 


7 


2 


8 53 













Pole and Bush Beans may be planted for a late crop. Sow Tomatoes at the beginning 
of this month, they will bear yet before frost sets in; also if the weather is favorable 
Corn may be planted yet for roasting ears. Plant Cucumbers for pickling, and sow Early 
Italian Giant Cauliflower, Endive, Lettuce and yellow and white summer Radish. 

In new ground W^hite Flat Dutch Turnips and Ruta Bagas may be sown, they will do 
well under favorable circumstances, although it is better to wait until next month, as 
they are very apt to become hard and stringy. 

Our gardeners here generally begin after the 15th of this month to sow Cabbage seed 
for an early winter crop. The leading varieties and most suitable for that purpose are: 
Frotscher's Superior Large Late Flat Dutch, Improved Drumhead, Crescent City Flat 
Dutch, Stein's Early Flat Dutch, Finke's Succession and Pride of the South, St. Dennis 
or Chou Bonneuil, and Large Flat Brunswick. The selection of the variety depends en- 
tirely on the condition of the soil, locality and time of planting. 

As to the proper time of sowing, we would say that this is very difficult to ascertain, as 
our seasons differ so much. Some years we have early frosts, other years again not be- 
fore January or even February, and Cabbage is most easily hurt when heading up. 
While the plants are small yet or half grown or when they are once headed, the cold 
weather has little effect upon them. It is, therefore, necessary to make several sowings 
at diftereut times, so that in case some of the Cabbage is destroyed b}'^ frost the other is 
coming on. Plants raised from seed in July and August will generally givo the best results. 

Brunswick is one of the earliest of the large growing varieties and should be sown in 
July and August, so that it may be headed up when cold weather sets in, otherwise it is 
apt to run into seed. It is more tender than the Superior Large Late ^la.t Dutch and 
Improved Drumhead. The same may be said of the Saint Dennis and Early Summer. 

Cabbage being a coarse feeder requires a strong and rich soil, and above all good cul- 
tivation. It is advisat)le to fertilize the ground well, either with stable manure, cotton 
seed meal or super-phosphate; Cow Peas, planted on Cabbage land and plowed under 
when they have the most foliage, with perhaps cotton seed meal as an adjuvant, are the 
cheapest and most effective fertilizer. 

By this time of the year twice the amount of Cabbage seed has to be sown to get a 
proper stand, as hot and dry weather and insects are very destructive. It is a very diffi- 
cult matter to protect the young plants from the ravages of the insects, which are, es- 
pecially after a mild winter, very plentiful and play sad havoc among young plants. 
Many good Insecticides are in use by our gardeners, but among all them Tobacco Dust 
is the most effective and cheapest. Against the Spanish Fly Paris Green should be used. 

IN THE FIELD. 

Cow Peas may still be sown for fertilizing purposes, and Sweet Potato slips can be 
planted for the latest crop. Sometimes, if the weather is not too dry. Corn may be 
planted for stock food, but cannot always be relied on. IN THE ORCHARD. 

Continue to bud Orange and other fruit trees. Young trees which have been set out in 
January and February, and are not sufficiently well established, must be watered during 
dry weather and the ground around them should be heavily mulched to prevent its dry- 
ing out. IN THE FLOWER GARDEN. 

Sow Zinnias, Cockscombs, Globe Amaranths and Balsams for Fall blooming. 



8tli Month. 



AUGUST. 



31 Days. 



Calculated for tlie I^atitude of the Southern States. 



First Quarter 5d. 

FuU Moon ...lid. 



Oh. 24m. After. I Last Quarter. . .20d 

8h. 22m. Mor. | New Moon 227d. 



2I1. I9m. Mor. 
\)h. 29m. After. 



Day of Month ond Week. 



1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

1* 

15 

16 



Sunday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 

Sunday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 

Sunday 

Monday 



Snn 
rises, 
h. m. 



5 19 
5 20 



Sun Moon 

sets. I r. & s. 

h. m. I h. m. 



5 20 
5 21 
5 21 
5 22 
5 22 
5 23 
5 24 
5 24 
5 25 
5 26 
5 26 
5 
5 
5 



27 
27 

28 



6 53 

6 52 
6 51 
6 50 
6 50 
6 49 
6 48 
6 47 
6 46 
6 45 
6 44 
6 43 
6 42 
6 41 
6 40 
6 39 



8 42 

9 14 

9 47 

10 25 

11 9 
morn 

56 

2 

3 8 



Day of Month and Week. 



; 4 16 ! 


27 


rises i 


28 


7 22 ; 


29 


7 53 


30 


' 8 22 1 


31 


8 51 j 





17 Tuesday 
IS Wednesday 
19 Thursday 
20j Friday 
2l| Saturday 
22| Sunday 
23j Monday 
24 Tuesday 
25i Wednesday 
26j Thursday 
Friday 
Saturday 
Sunday 
Monday 
Tuesday 



Sun 


rises. , 


h. 


m.j 


5 


29 ' 


5 


29 1 


5 


30 1 


5 


30 1 


5 


31 


5 


32 


5 


32 


5 


33 


I 5 


33 


5 


44 


5 


34 


5 


35 


5 


35 


5 


36 


5 


36 



Sun : Moon 

sets. ' r. & s. 
h* m. 1 h. m. 



6 38 
6 37 
6 36 
6 35 
6 34 
6 33 
6 32 
6 31 
6 30 
6 29 
6 28 
6 26 
6 25 
6 24 
6 23 



9 21 
9 56 

10 34 

11 17 
morn 
5 
58 



00 

55 
56 
59 



sets 

7 16 

7 48 

8 26 



At the early part of the month Bush Beans, and at the middle and towards the end> 
Extra Early and Washington Peas can be planted; also the late Cabbages, such as Supe- 
rior and Crescent City Flat Dutch. Late Drumhead, Finke's Succession, Pride of the 
South, Drumhead Savoy, etc.; Broccoli, Brussels Sprouts and Kale may be sown. 

At the early part of the month Early Italian Giant Caulillower, and Early Short 
Stemmed Neapolitan may be sown; and later in the month Half Early Paris, and other 
half early varieties. In fact, we consider this the propf^r time for the Half Early Paris. 

Sow Parsley, Roquette, Chervil, Lettuce, Endive and Sorrel; but do not forget to keep 
them well watered during hot weather, otherwise they will prove a failure. Parsley 
should be covered with moss or latania leaves as protection against the sun. Do not 
forget to germinate your Lettuce seed, otherwise the ants will have a feast. 

Yellow Summer or Golden Globe, V^^'hite Summer Turnip, and White Strasburgh 
Radish may be sown during this month, and towards the end the Half Long French, 
Long Scarlet, Scarlet Turnip and Black Spanish varieties may follow. 

Sow early varieties of Turnips and Ruta Bagas, Vienna Kohlrabi, Swiss Chard, some 
early Beets, Mustard and Cress. 

In the latter part of this month, providing the weather is not too hot or dry, Half Long, 
St. Valerie and Creole Carrots can be sown, but it is best to wait until next month, as 
nothing is gained by too early sowing. Celery of all kinds, such as Large Wbite Solid, 
Dwarf Large Ribbed. Perfection Hartwell, Golden Yellow Self Blanching and Giant 
Pascal should be sown now. and plants of the first sowing transplanted. Celery plants, 
if set out during this month, require to be well shaded and watered, otherwise they will 
not take. 

Tomato plants for a late crop, if not set out during the previous month, should now be 
planted and well watered so as to give them a start. 

Set out Shallots and plant Red and White Kidney Beans for shelling. In the 

FIELD. 

Plant Potatoes for an early winter crop. Only small ones saved from spring crops 
should be selected for that purpose and must not be cut, but planted whole. Begin to 
plow under some Cow Peas, so as to get land ready to set out Cabbage and Cauliflower 
plants. IN THE ORCHARD 

Continue to bud. if the weather is not too hot and drv and the stools remain in sap. 

IN THE FLOWER GAKDEN 

Sow flower seeds for late blooming, such as Balsams, Zinnias, Cockscombs, etc. 

Oup assortment of Flower Seeds and Flowering* Bulbs, suitable for our 
Southern climate, is the best that can be found. 



9tli Month. 



SEHTKVIBER. 



30 Days. 



Calculated for the IVatitude of the Southern States. 



JVIooirx's I^ii^s^s. 



First Quarter 3d. 

Full Moon lOd. 



5h. I3m. After. 
8h. 12ni. After. 



Last Quarter 18d. 

New Moon 26d. 



Day of Month and Week, 



1 
2 
3 
4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 



Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 

Sunday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 

Sunday 

Mouda3^ 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 



Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


rises. 


sets. 


r. &s. 


h, m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


5 37 


6 22 


9 9 


5 37 


21 


9 57 


5 38 


6 19 


10 50 


5 39 


6 18 


11 51 


5 39 


6 17 


morn 


5 40 


6 16 


58 


5 40 


6 14 


2 5 


5 41 


(> 13 


3 10 


5 41 


6 12 


4 12 


5 42 


6 11 


5 13 


5 42 


G 10 


rises 


5 43 


6 8 


6 51 


5 44 


G 7 


7 21 


5 44 


6 6 


7 53 


5 45 


6 5 


8 30 



Day of Month and Week. 



16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 



Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 

Sunday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 

Sunday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 



8h. 51m. After. 
7h. 46m. Morn. 



Moon 
r. &s. 
h. m. 



Sun 


Sun 


rises. 


sets. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


5 45 


6 3 


5 45 


6 2 


5 46 


6 1 


5 46 


6 


5 47 


5 59 


5 48 


5 57 


5 48 


5 56 


5 49 


5 55 


5 49 


5 54 


5 50 


5 52 


5 51 


5 51 


5 51 


5 50 


5 52 


5 49 


5 52 


5 47 


5 52 


5 46 



9 11 
9 57 

10 48 

11 43 
morn 

41 

1 40 

2 42 

3 44 

4 47 
sets 

6 22 

7 3 

7 51 

8 50 



Whatever has been mentioned last month should be sown during this month, with 
the exception of Cabbage, which should be sown more sparinglv, or at least not in large 
quantities for a general crop. IN THE VEGETABLE GARDETST 

Plant during the early part, Bush Beans, they vvill bear vet before frost sets in; also 
early varieties of Peas, such as Extra Early, Early Alaska, Early Washington, Alpha and 
Bishop's Dwarf. 

Sow during this month all varieties of Radishes, Carrots, Beets, Turnips, Parsley, 
Parsnips, Salsify, Spinach, Roquette, Chervil, Leek, Sorrel, Cress, Lettuce, Endive, Kohl- 
rabi, Brussels Sprouts, Broccoli, all varieties of Cauliflower, Kale, Corn Salad and Mus- 
tard. Toward the end of this month our gardeners begin to sow the New Orleans Im- 
proved Passion and Trocadero Lettuce; both are excellent shipping varieties. After the 
15th of this month, some of our truck farmers begin sowing the seed of the Louisiana or 
Creole Onion, and continue up to the middle of next month, as the first sowing is not 
always successful. We would advise though not to sow before the end of the month, 
as the Onions often show a tendency to throw up seed stalks If sown too earl}^ which 
greatly injures their keeping qualities. By hot and dry weather the seed beds should be 
kept moist, and in order to facilitate this they should be covered over with gray moss 
until the young plants appear above the ground. 

Celery plant should be set out into ditches made for that purpose, and if large 
enoug, transplant Cabbage and Cauliflower plants. 

Plant Shallots; divide and set out Sorrel, Sow Turnip rooted Celery, and such varie- 
ties of Sweet Herbs as Sage, Thyme, Majorum and Savory. If Cabbage is sown during 
this month it should be of early varieties. IN THE FIELD 

Keep on preparing land to set out Cabbage plants, and plant Potatoes ^'■et; they will 
come well if we have no early frosts of any consequence. 

Laud should be broken up now so as to sow during the next month Forage plants? 
such as Rye, Oats, Wheat and Barley. THE ORCHARD 

Requires little attention during this month, as beyond budding Orange trees no work 
can be done. IN THE FLOWER GARDEN 

The sowing of FloWer seeds for winter and early spring blooming may be begun 
with. Sow such varieties as for instance, Pausies, Sweet Alyssum, Candytuft, Stocks, 
Phlox, Asters. Chinese, Japanese, Marguerite and Carnation Pinks, Daisies, Petunias, 
Verbenas, etc. 



We carry the largest and most complete stock of Flower, Field and 
Garden Seeds of any house in the South. 



lotH Month. 



OCTOBER. 



31 Days. 



Calculated for the I^atitude of the Southern States. 



First Quarter 2d. 

Full Moon lOd. 



llh. 31m. After. 
lOh. 42m. Mor, 



Last Quarter.. I8d 3h. 

New Moon 257d. 5h. 



9m. 
28 m. 



After. 
After. 





Sun 


Sun 


Moon 






Sun 


Sun 1 Moon 


Day of Month ond Week. 


rises. 


sets. 


r, &s. 


Day of Month and Week, 


rises. 


sets. ' r. & s. 




h. m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 






h. m. 


h* m. 


h. m. 


1 


Friday 


5 53 


5 45 


9 46 


17 


Sunday 


6 4 


5 27 


10 29 


2 


Saturday 


5 53 


5 44 


10 52 


18 


Monday 


6 4 


5 26 11 27 


3 


Sunday 


5 54 


5 43 


11 57 


19 


Tuesdav 


6 5 


5 25 


morn 


4 


Monday 


5 55 


5 41 


morn 


20 


Wednesday 


6 5 


5 24 


5 


5 


Tuesday 


5 56 


5 40 


1 1 


21 


Thursday 


6 6 


5 23 


1 25 


6 


Wednesday 


5:56 


5 39 


2 4 


22 


Friday 


6 7 


5 22 


2 27 


7 


Thursday 


5 57 


5 38 


3 5 


23 


Saturday 


6 8 


5 21 


3 29 


8 


Friday 


5 58 


5 37 


4 3 


21 


Sunday 


H 8 


5 20 


4 34 


9 


Saturday 


5 58 


5 35 


4 59 


25 


Monday 


6 9 


5 19 


4 43 


10 


Sunday- 


5 59 


5 34 


5 55 


26 


Tuesday 


6 10 


5 18 


sets 


11 


Monday 


6 


5 33 


rises 


27 


Wednesday 


6 11 


5 17 


6 34 


12 


Tuesday 


6 


5 32 


6 30 


28 


Thursday 


6 11 


5 16 


7 35 


13 


Wednesday 


6 1 


5 41 


7 8 


29 


Friday 


6 12 


5 15 


8 42 


14 


Thursday 


6 2 


5 30 


7 52 


30 


Saturday 


6 13 


5 14 


9 49 


15 


Friday 


6 2 


5 29 


8 40 


31 


Sunday 


6 14 


5 13 


10 54 


16 


Saturday 


6 3 


5 28 


9 33 













October is a month of great importance to our truck farmers as a good deal of sow- 
ing and transplanting has to be done. IN THE VEGETABLE GAKDEX 

" If the weather permits, Artichokes may be dressed and the sprouts taken off and 
transplanted, but as the weather is generally dry it is advisable to wait until next month. 

Creole Onion seed can still be sown yet up to the fifteenth of this mouth, but Bermuda, 
which is much earlier, can be sown during the entire month. At the latter part Black- 
eyed, White and Dwarf Marrowfat Peas can be planted; also English Wihdsor Beans. 
This is the best time to sow the Frotscher Company's Winter Market Pea. 

Sow Cabbage, Spinach, Early Cauliflower, Broccoli. Brussels Sprouts, Kale, Mus- 
tard, Swiss Chard, Carrots, Beets of all kinds, Salsify, Leeks. Corn Salad or Doucette, 
Parsley, Roquette, Chervil, Kohlrabi, Radishes, Lettuce, Endive, Escarolle, Turnips 
and Parsnip. 

Transplant and divide Shallots which have been previously planted. In order to be 
successful with Salsify, it should be sown now, and in well prepared, deeply spaded 
ground. Salsify is generally sown too late, in insufliciently prepared ground, and, as a 
consequence, the roots will be short and full of small side roots. In fresh manured ground, 
Salsify will not do well; it is, therefore best to sow in beds that had been well manured 
in the spring. 

Celery, which had been transplanted during the previous month, may be hilled up 
at the end of this month, if large enough. A liberal application of soap water will be 
found beneficial to them. IN THE FIELD 

Begin sowing Rye, Barley, Wheat, Red Oats, for stock food; also Orchard, English 
and Italian Rye, Kentucky Blue. Red Top, and Rescue Grass. Crimson, Red, White, 
Alsike, Burr and Alfalfa or Lucerne Clover. IN THE ORCHARD 

Pay attention to Scale and other insects, and prepare land to set out more trees dur- 
ing the winter. Some years, when the weather is favorable and the trees are in sap, 
Orange trees may be budded on to sour i-tock, but not on to trifoliata. 

Transplant Strawbeiry plants; the young plants should be used for that purpose, as 
old plants will not take well. Strawberry plants must be transplanted every year and 
the ground renewed. They cannot be left for two years in the same ground. 

IN THE FLOWER GAKDEX 

Considerable work has to be done during this month. For early blooming. Hya- 
cinths, Narcissus, Jonquills, Anemones, Ranunculus and Tulips, may be planted from 
now on in succession during the following months up to the end of December. 

Sow all winter and spring blooming annuals in shallow bosses or seed pans, to be 
transplanted when large enough. The following are the principal varieties for sowing: 
Pansies, Daisies, Sweet Alyssum, Candytuft, Petunias, Phlox, Verbena. Columbine, 
Chinese Japan and Carnation Pinks, in fact all winter and spring blooming varieties may 
he sown now. 

In sowing the flower seeds, especially the finer varieties, do not cover them too deep; 
twice the thickness of the seed is suflicient; have your soil fine and mellow, never allow 
the seed to become too dry, but never overwater them. One is equally as bad as the 
other; the little grains of seed, especially while they are germinating, are easily destroy- 
ed, and as a common occurrence, the blame will be laid at the seedsman's door when 
they fail to come up. 



nth Month. 



NOVBMBER. 



30 Days. 



Calculated for the I/atitude of the Southern States. 



First Quarter Id. 8h. 

Full Moon 9d. 3h. 50m 

Last Quarter I7d. 8h. 2m 



37m. Morn. 1 New Moon 24d. 

Morn. I First Quarter 30d. 

After- 



3h. 



20m. 
14m. 



Mern. 
After. 





Sun 


Sun 


Moon 






Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


Day of Month and Week. 


rises 


sets 


r. &s. 


Day of Month and Week. 


rises 


sets 


r. & 8. 




h. m. 


h. 


m. 


h. m. 






h. m. 


h. 


m. 


h. m. 


1 


Monday, 


G 14 


5 


13 


11 58 


16 


Tuesday 


6 26 


5 


4 


11 14 


2 


Tuesiday, 


6 15 





12 


morn 


17 


Wednesday, 


'1 27 


5 


3 


morn 


3 


Wednesday, 


6 16 


b 


11 


59 


18 


Thursday, 


6 28 


5 


3 


12 


4 


Thursday, 


6 17 


i) 


JO 


1 57 


19 


Friday, 


6 29 


5 


2 


1 12 


5 


Friday, 


G 18 





10 


2 53 


20 


Saturday, 


6 30 


5 


2 


2 15 


6 


Saturday, 


6 18 





9 


3 49 


21 


Sunday, 


6 31 


5 


2 


3 21 


7 


Sunday, 


6 19 





8 


4 45 


22 


Monday, 


6 32 


5 




4 30 


8 


Monday, 


6 20 


5 


8 


5 42 


23 


Tuesdav, 


6 32 


5 


'i 


5 41 


9 


Tuesday, 


6 21 


5 


V 


rises 


24 


Wednesday, 


6 34 


5 




sets 


10 


Wednesday 


6 21 


b 


V 


5 51 


25 


Thursday, 


6 35 


5 




6 20 


11 


I'hursday, 


6 22 





6 


6 37 


26 


Friday, 


6 36 


5 




7 30 


12 


Friday, 


6 23 








7 27 


27 


Saturday, 


6 37 


5 





8 41 


13 


Saturday, 


6 24 








8 22 


28 


Sunday, 


6 37 


5 





9 48 


14 


Sunday, 


6 25 





4 


9 19 


29 


Monday, 


6 38 


5 





10 51 


15 


Monday 


6 26 





4 


10 16 


30 


Tuesday, 


6 56 


5 





U 51 



All land which, owing to the weather, could not be plowed or otherwise worked, 
should be gotten ready now. IN THE VEGETABLE GARDEN. 

The following should be sown in succession : Superior Large Late Flat Dutch and 
Improved Drumhead Cabbage for spring crop, Brunswick, Early Summer, Stein's Early, 
Finke's Succession, Finke's Pride of the South and other medium early varieties. Caul- 
iflower, Spinach, Long scarlet, Black Spanish, and Chinese Kose Radish, Kale, Mustard, 
Carrots, Corn Salad, Parsley, Lettuce, Parsnip, Kohlrabi and Chervil. Salsify, if sown 
now, will not do well; it is rather late for it. 

Late varieties of Peas, such as Blackeyed Marrowfat, Large White Marrowfat, Royal 
Dwarf Marrowfat, etc., should be sown yet; also English Windsor Beans. 

Hot beds for Cucumbers should be gotten ready now. 

Continue to transplant Artichoke plants, and if not attended to during the month 
previous, work up and manure the old plants and remove the superfluous suckers. 

IN THE FIELD 

Set out Cabbage and Califlower plants and work those transplanted before. If fer- 
tilizer is required, Cotton Seed Meal may be applied in laying by. 

Oats, Rye, Wheat, Barley and the different varieties of grass seed, such as Rescue, 
Orchard, Red Top, Meadow Fescue, Tall Meadow Oat, Red, White and Crimson Clover, 
Alfalfa or Luzerne and Alsike can still be sown during this month, either for green food 
or hay. IN THE ORCHARD 

Prepare a:round for setting out fruit trees, and if trees are dormant, which is indi- 
cated by their shedding the leaves, some may be transplanted. 

Strawberry plants can still be set out; in fact, if during the previous month the 
weather was not extremely favorable, we have to rely principally on this month's plant- 
ing. IN THE FLOWER GARDEN 

Much work has to be done during this month. Roses, if checked by frost, can be 
taken up and potted. Beds have to be gotten ready for transplanting. Annuals should 
be sown yet for late blooming. 

Hyacinths, Tulips, Narcissus, Ranunculus, Anemones and other bulbs for spring 
bloommg should be planted now. 

Our assortment of Flower Seeds and Flowering" Bulbs, suitable for our 
Southern climate, is the best that can be found. 



1 2th Mouth. 



DECEMBER. 



31 Days. 



Calculated for the I/atitude of the Southern States. 



Fall Moon Sd. lOh. 

Last Quarter 16d. I2h. 



54m. After. 
22m. After- 



I >.ew Moon _ ilid. Ih. 55m. ^fter. 

I First Quarter 30d. Ih. 27m. After. 



I 


Sun 


Sun 


Moon 






Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


Dav of Mouth and Week. 


rises 


sets 


r. & s. 


Dav of Month and Week. 


rises 


sets 


r. & s. 




i). m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 






h. m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


1 Wednesday. 


G 39 


5 


1 
morn ' 


17I 


Fridav. 


•) 50 


5 3 


1 


2 


Thursday. 


6 40 


5 


4b 


:s 


Saturday. 


6 51 


5 4 


1 2 


3 


Fi'iday, 


6 41 


5 U 


1 44 ; 


i9 


Sunday, 


6 51 


5 4 


2 8 


4 


Saturday. 


6 42 


5 1 


2 40 


20 


Monday. 


6 52 





3 16 


5 


Sunday. 


6 42 


5 1 


3 3G 


21 


Tuesday 


6 52 


5 5 


4 26 


6 


Monday. 


6 43 


5 1 


4 80 


99 


Wednesday. 


6 52 


5 6 


5 38 


7 


Tuesday. 


6 44 


5 1 


5 26 


28 


Thursday. 


6 58 


5 6 


sets 


S 


Wednesday. 


6 44 


5 1 


6 22 ; 


24 


Friday, 


6 54 


5 7 


6 16 


9 


Thursday, 


6 45 


5 1 


rises 


25 


Satui'day, 


6 54 


/ 


7 26 


10! Fridav, 


6 46 


5 1 


6 16 i 


26 


Sunday, 


6 54 


5 8 


8 33 


llj Saturday. 


6 46 


I 


7 12 


27 


Monday. 


6 55 


5 9 


9 3S 


12j Sunday. 


6 47 


5 2 


8 9 


28 


Tuesday, 


6 55 


5 10 


10 38 


13 


Monday, 


6 48 


2 


9 7 


29 


Wednesday, 


6 55 ! 


5 10 


11 36 


14 


Tuesday, 


6 48 


5 2 


10 5 1 


30 


Thursday, 


6 56 


5 11 


morn 


15 


Wednesday 


6 49 


5 3 


11 3 


31 


Friday. 


6 56 


5 12 


33 


16 


Thursday. 


6 50 


5 3 


morn 













During this month not much work can be done beyond hoeing and cleaning. 

IX THE VEGETABLE GAKDEX 

All such \york ^yhich. perhaps, owing to unfayorable weather, could not be done last 
month may be done during the present one. The Cucumber hot beds, it is supposed, 
haye been gotten ready last mouth and the young plants are in a good gro\yiug :condi- 
tion and wHl. therefore, require constant and careful watching. If the weather is warm, 
plenty of air should be given, while on the other hand the beds require protection dur- 
ing the night. It is necessary to haye plenty of coyeriug material in close proximity to 
the hot beds, so that in case of emergency Ihey may be covered in the shortest time 
possible. The temperature should be kept as even in the Cucumber beds as possible. 

Durirg this month. Peas for a general crop may be planted, especially if the place is 
protected so that, in case of extremely cold weather during January and February, they 
may have some shelter. 

Soy yet Spinach. Roquette, Radishes. Lettuce. Endive. Carrots, etc., and in cold 
frames, wherein case of cold weather thev may be covered. Early Cabbages, such as Early 
York, Large York. Winningstadt, Oshea'rt, Earlv and Extra Early Cauliflowers, for in- 
stance Early Erfurt. Half Early Paris, Le Xorma'nd and Early Snowball for transplanting 
in February. During cold weather they require to be covered during the night; if sashes 
are on hand they should be used, otherwise boards, matting or sacks would answer. An 
excellent substitute for sashes over cold frames, and one which is even warmer, and may 
in case of necessity remain on the beds during cold and cloudy, or cold and wet davs. can 
be made of old sash frames, over which a material known under the name of Gertnan 
Feuster Pappe. has been stretched, and rendered transparent by a coating of boiled Lin- 
seed Oil. and followed by a coat of ordinary copal varnish. Those covered frames are 
transparent enough to admit sufficient light. 

Transplant Creole and Bermuda Onions, which were sown in September and October, 
but do not forget to trinthe tops audioDts a little, as it insures their growth. 

IX THE FIELD 

Sow yet, if not done so durins; the previous month. Alfalfa. Red. White, and Crimson 
Clover. Orchard Grass. Red Top.^Kentucky Blue. Rye. Barley. Wheat and Rust Proof 
Oats for stock food: although it is late, but under favorable conditions it will do well 
yet. ' IX THE ORCHARD 

Set out fruit trees of all kinds, prune, work and fertilize those already established 
and attend to all necessaries to be done. Sow Pecans to raise trees from. 

IX THE FLOWER GARDEX 

Xot a great deal can be done this month. Roses may be set out if the the weather 
permits. Plant Hyacinths and other spring blooming bulbs for late blooming. 

Sow flower seeds yet in a cold frame, and pay attention to all necessary work. Do not 
neglect plants in frames out of doors, give plenty of air when the weather permits and 



cover well during cold nights. 



RICHARD FROTSCHER SEED CO., Ltd. 



01J^I« 



novelties U Specialties lor 1897. 



PRE- HISTORIC CORN, 

We are always on the alert for some new varieties 
of seed to brinjJ^ to the notice of our patrons with 
the view of introdncino^ same, if found, after careful 
trial, to be of sufficient value and a decided improve- 
ment on what we already have listed. By special 
arraoi^ement with the originator, we have been able 
to obtain a limited quantity of a new and entirely 
distinct variety of corn, which he styles the 'Tre- 
Historic." 

The originator. Rev. Dr. E. S.Curry, of Arkansas, 
claims that about nine years ago, by examining the 
contents of the ancient Indian mounds near the 
Ozark Mountains, several ears of corn were found 
in a clay vessel hermatically sealed up and in a per- 
fect state of preservation. He planted some of it on 
his farm, where it came up well and bore abundantly 
the first year. He has cultivated this variety ever 
^ince, and up to to the present day, he states, it has 
never been known to fail. 

The Pre-Historic Corn is a very distinct type, of a 
dark bronze color, gliding to a very light bronze 
and a brilliant red. The, stalks he claims, grow to 
a height of tiftteen feet, ten feet and five inches 
from tip to tip of the longest blade, the blades seven 
inches across, and from two to eleven ears to the 
stalk. It is said to be a deep feeder; willingly and 
Irom choic^e taking root in the subsoil, thrusting its 
roots down deeper on the approach of a drought. 

While growing the stalks have a beautiful bluish 
cast, peculiar to itself and in the earlier stages of 
the development of the ears the grains are green. 

In packages 25 and 50c. 

FKOTSCHER CD'S EARLY MARKET 
LETTUCE. 

This is the best "all the year around"' Cabbage 
Lettuce, equally as good for shipping as for our home 
market, and especially adapted fpr forcing in the 
hot-beed. In summer time when it is almost impos- 
sil)le to grow good Lettuce in our hot Southern cli- 
mate, and when all other varifties either run into 
seeds or forha instead of heads- but mere bunches of 
leaves, this variety heads up although not as solid as 
in spring or autumn, sufficiently well and remains i 
crisp and tender foi- a long time. It is, besides the ' 
Perpignau, the only Lettuce which our gardeners 
grow during the summer months. 

NEW ORLEANS IMPROVED PASSION 

LETTUCE. 

This variety -has since its introduction in New 
Orleans proved to be not only the hardiest and most 
suitable Lettuce for our southern climate, but also 
the best shipper which we ever possessed. Thous- 
ands of barrels of the mostpertect heads are annually 
shipped from here to northern and western markets 
and bring invariably better prices than any other 
variety. The New Orleans Improved Passion, or as 
it is called here for short -'New Orleans Shipping 
Lettuce'' was originally brought herefrom California 
and attains a large size, grows slowly but heads 




Ear of i're -Historic Coin. 



ii 



THE SEED ANNUAI, OF THE 




very bard. If sown iu autumn and trai>splante(f 
a« soon as large enf>ugh it will come on for ship- 
ping in January, just at the time when Lettuce 
in Northern and Western markets is a scarce ar- 
ticle. To the successful Southern Trucker no^ 
other vegetable, if sown at the right time,, proves- 
as remunerative as the Passion Lettuce. 

We do not bring it here as a novelty but can- 
not help but mention it as one of our specialties,, 
and feel assure 1 that wherever tried it will not 
fail to give satisfaction. 

GOI/DEN SEI/F- BLANCHING CELERY. 

Although this Celery is not a novelty, it may 
be regarded as one of the best varieties for our 
climate and soil, and will be in but a short time 
our principal market variety. The beart is solid, 
very tender, and of a beanliful golden yellow 
coloi; the ribs britt e nnd of a delicious flavor, 
]t bleaches much ea«-ier than any other and the 
stalks have never been known to become hollow 
yet. We recommend tbis variety highi3% know- 
ing it to be the best that can be grown here. 



NEW ORLEANS 3IAKKET 

BER. 



CUCUM- 



Of all Cucumber varieties that ever were tried 
here, none has given as much satisfaction as the 
New Orleans Market. As it originated right here 
in New Orleans, being a hybrid of two of our 
best market varieties, it is not only perfectly 
adapted to our peculiar climate and soil, but has 
by far exceeded the parent plants by retaining 
Golden Self-Blanchiug Celery. the good qualities of both. 

It is equally as good for forcing as for out of door culture, and cannot be excelled 
for shipping, as it produces the most perfect Cucumbers with but few if any culls, re- 
mains longer green than any other, and in consequence brings better prices iu Northern 
markets. The largest Cucumber growers in New Orleans and vicinity, and especially 
those at <4rand Isle and the Lower Coast, plant no others than the New Orleans Market. 
For forcing our market gardeners prefer it to the White Spine, as it produces but few 
Vines, is longer, and above all very productive. As >ear8 ago this variety was errone- 
ously called by some of our gardeners ''The Long Green White Spine, some Northern 
Seedsmen sent out the Improved Long White Spine, which is however quite different 
from the New Orleans Market; the similarity of the names has deceived a great many. 



NEW ORLEANS MARKET MUSK MELON. 

It may be safely asserted that no other part of the country produces finer Musk 
Melons than lower Louisiana, and it is especially the vicinity of New Orleans where the 
most delicious are produced. In the New Orleans Market, which like the above de- 
scribed Cucumber originated right here, we possess a variety which foi' size, delicious 
flavor and other good qualities cannot be excelled by any other variety in the world. It 
is of the true Citron type, roughly netted and ' large iu size but altogether different from 
Northern Netted Citron, which is '^arlier. much smaller and not as tine in flavor. In a 
favorable season the New Orleans Market Melon is a perfect gem of handsome form and 
color, with thin rind and but few seeds. 

It has been tried side by side with some of the highly praised Northern varieties as 
are brought out every year, but none of them could compare with the New Orleans 
Market. Seed of this variety grown up North will lose its identity, as it takes a South- 
ern sun to perfect it. There is no doubt that other varieties, if grown here for a number 
of years could be more perfected, but whether they would reach that point of perfection 
peculiar to the New Orleans Market we cannot say. 



RICHARD FRpTSCHl^R Sl^BD CO., Ivtd. 



Ill 



The seed we offer has 
heea espeoiallj^ jrrown for 
^is and Gjatbered under our 
own supervision from tb« 
most pei'fect specimens, 

FROTSCHER C O ' S 

GEM WATER 

MELON, 

This new Water Melon, 
'Which is cross between the 
Duke Jones and Kolb Gem, 
has for the first time the 
past season be«ri tried on 
-our -experimental ground, 
and gave such entire satis- 
faction that v^e concluded 
to add it to our list of nov- 
■elties. 

As a market sort and for 
shipment we consider it the 
l»est that has ever been in- 
troduced; it is very prolific, 
very early and of uniform 
«ize. 

The rind, like the Duke 
Jones, is of a dark screen 
color, the flesh of a beauti- 




ful deep red, and the seed exactly the same color as those o 
Melon it is of much better flavor than the Kolb Gem. 



f JCnA.. - 



New Orleans Market Musk Melon-. 

f the Kolb G3m. As a table 




The average size of the 
Melon is very large, fre- 
quently weighing over 40 
pounds, and the vines are 
very pi-oductive. At no far 
distance this Melon will su- 
percede the Kolb Gem as 
e-ither a market or shipping 
variety,, as it is superior in 
quality and equa.ly as hand- 
some in appearance. 

Price per lb. $1.00, per i^ 
lb. 30c., per package 10c. 



FROTSCHER CO'S 

SACCHARINE 

BEAUTY WATER 

MELON. 

The Saccharine Beauty, a 
Melon of recent introduc- 
tion, is an excellent ship- 
ping variety of large uni- 
Frotscher Co.'s Gem Water Melon. form size arid fine quality. 

We have grown it during the past season on our Trial Grounds and found it to be one of 
the very best that ever had been grown here. The fruit is large and heavy, of a light 
green color nordering somewhat on grey, fiefch solid and firm, of a beautiful deep red 
color, very sweet and tender, and rind thin but very firm. Ths Melon remains in condi- 
tion for use much longer than any other and has no equal for shipping to distant markets. 
It may be considered the very best shipping Melon and surpasses Kolb's Gem not only in 
size and appearance but also in quality. 

Price per pound ^1.00, per i^ pound 30c., per package 10c. 



IT 



i^nn sb:^d annuax of th^ 




\ 



Frotscher. Company's Saccharine Beauty Water Melon, 

KING'S IMFAOVD^D COTTON. 

By special arrangement with Mr. T. J. 
King, theoriginator of the celebrated King's 
Improved Cotton, we have secured the 
exclusive right for the Southern States to 
sell the seed of the above variety. 

For six years King's Improved Cotton 
has stood at the front as the earliest a?id 
most productive cotton grown in this coun- 
try. Mr. King's claims are not idle boasts, 
but every statement he makes is backed b^ 
official State reports from various State 
Experiment Farms. 

Every one must know that the tests are 
fair a7id absolutely impai-tial. and they show i>^Cl_p 
beyond any doubt that under the" same " ''-'^^*-'- 
conditions of soil, climate and cultivation. 

KING'S IMPROVED COTTON IS THE BEST. 

In the repor of Mr. Reeding. Director of the Georgia Experiment Station, it is said 
that: King's Improved Cotton stand second in earliness; fourth in smsllness of seef^s* 
thirteenth m largeness of bolls; third in percenta-e of Liiit to Cotton Seed; fourth in vield 
of seed ; fourth in yield of Seed Cotter , and first in value of total products. 

Read the following letter of Director R. J. Redding to Mr. T. T. Kincr- 
.. GEORGIA EXPERIMENT STATION. Experiment. Ga.. January- 12, 1896. 
Mr. T. J. King, Richmond, la.: 

My Dear Sir:— This 3'ear the variety tests shows King's Improved at the verv top of 
the list. 

I consider your variety the most distinct and well marked and most constant of 
all that I have tested during the last six vears. It certainlv requires closer plantiuif and 
you will be interested m the experiment to test this point when you get a copv of Bulletin 
No. 31, now being prepared for the printer. Very truly, 

^ _, , R.J Redding. Director. 

Prices— $1.50 per bushel for single bushel; 5 bushels for $6.50. 




RICHARD FROTSCHl^R SB^D CO., I,td. 



V 



NEW ORL9^JANS MARKET EGGPLANT. 

The best Eojgplant for our Southern climate and almost the only variety grown by 
our gardeners tor shipping to Northern and Western markets. Thefruit is large, 
oval in shape and of a handsome purplish black color, and is, not like the New 
York Improved, entirely free of thorns. 

This variety originated here in New Orleans, and has, by c ireful selection and, long 
cultivation, been brought to its present state of perfection. The seed which we offer of 
this Eggplant is Southern grown, as Northern seed, like a good many tropical andsub- 
tropicafplants, will lose partly its ideniity. See cut of Eggplant on page 46.| 

TH:E giant BEGGARS' WEED. 

A valuable forage plant and a wonderful ]r 
rCvStorer of the land; far more valuable as a 
featilizer than either Cow Peas or Clover 
and superier tc either for forage. Besides, 
when once established in the soil it comes 
up annually without any further attention. It 
interferes with no crop, being easily kept un- 
der cultivation, and can easily be eradicated 
from soil by two years sue :essive pasturing. 
The plant has deep feeding roots and brings 
up from the subsoil the dormant fertilizing 
elements. It is astonishing to what extent 
it enriches the land; poor soil which would j 
not yield even 8 bushels of corn per acre, 
yielded after being sown in Beggar weed, 
readily from 20 to 25 bushels, with never an 
ounce of fertilizer being used. For forage 
it has no equal. 

Hogs, cows, horses and mules fatten on it 
when nothing else will bring them Out. 
Old worn out horses and mules when turned 
n Beggar weed pasture will get fat and 
sleek without any attention. About five 
pounds will plant an acre. 

Per pound. 50 cents; 5 pounds, $2.00; 10 
pounds, $3.50. Special prices on large 
quantities. allowing Beggarweecl's Siyle of Growth. 

FROTSCHER CO'S PRESERVING CITRON. 

This is not a novelty, l)ut rather an old plant, it deserves to be brought to the notice 
of our patrons and there fore we deem it necessary to give it a space in our specialty list. 
The seed we offer of this variety is not of the same old stock, but is an improved variet5% 
the result of careful cultivation and selecting of the best and most perfect fruit until it 
has reached its present hi^h point of perfection. The fruit in appearance resembles a me- 
dium-sized water melon of a light green color, dusted over with a white lime like resinous 
substance, which makes it look as if rolled in flour. 

Price per pound, $1.00; per ^ pound, 30c.; per package,"^ loc. 

FI\KE\S FUIDE OF THE SOUTH CABBAGE. 

After two years careful trial in the South we have added this novelty to our already 
large list of Cabbage varieties. We call it ''The Pride of the South,'" and do not think 
that this name is misapplied, as it is one of the most uniform heading and handsomest 
of all early Cabbages. lu appearance it resembles the German Brunswick somewhat, 
but is not quite as large nor as tlat. It is quite as early, or perhaps a few days earlier, 
and should be sown for a spring crop at the same time as the Brunswick or Early Sum- 
mer. At Frenler. the great Cabbage section of Louisiana, where Brunswick is the prin- 
ciple variety, the Pride of the South has been tried side by side with this and was pro- 
nounced more uniform and equallv as h^xrdv. 

Price per lb. |8.00, per 1^ lb. $1.00, per^oz. 30c. 




VI 



th:e s:ebd annuai, of th:^ 






X 



FINKE'S SUCCESSION CABBAGE. 

A splendid variety with 
laro^e round and very solid 
heads of uniform <ize and sim- 
ilar to the preceding. This 
variety has also been tried at 
Frenier and gave such satisfac- 
tion that in course of hut a 
short time it will take the place 
of the German Brunswick, al- 
though the latter is an excel- 
lenr vaiiety. For shipping 
Finke's Succession cannot be 
excelled. Per lb. ^3.00, }i lb. 
Sl.OO. per oz. 30c. 

WHITE ROCKDALE 
COBX= 

The TThite Rockdale is like 
the Mosby's Proliiic a true 
Southern Corn, and has where- 
ever planted given entire satis- 
Finke's Succession Cabbage. faction. It is an ezcelleut 

yielder. equally as fine for meal as it is for stock food, and has proven to be everything 
that was claimed for it. It is beyond doubt the best Southern Corn in cultivation, suf- 
ficiently flinty to withstand the weevils, moderately early, with a small cob and large 
pure white and deeply dented grain. Wo recommend it highly and are sure it will give 
satisfaction, 

FROTSCHER CO.'S STONE TO3IAT0. 




This new Tomato, after a year's 
careful trial, is brought to the notice 
of the Southern truck farmers by us 
for the first time this year, and we 

are confident that in but a short time 
It will be a favorite variety with 
them. Its solidity and carrying 
qualities are remarkable. The coloV 
of the fruit is a very bright red. the 
shape more globular than either Fa- 
vorite or Beauty and perfectly 
smooth. We consider it one of the 
handsomest and most deiirable of all 
the Tomato varieties, and above all 
fche best shipper. It is an excellent 
bearer and we recommend it to 
all. 







'fl ■■^ll \\ H '■' 




Frotscber Company's Stone Tomato. 



FROTSCHER CO'S^LONG 3IA3IMOTH PL3IPKIN. 

A very handsome Puuipkin of immense size, frequent'y weighing from 60 to 80 lbs. 
Fine grain and excellent quality and flavor. The seed of this variety was brought here 
several years ago by some Italisn emmigrants under the name of Spanish Puajpk u and 
has been cultivated here ever since, and its present state of perfection is due to careful 
culiivation and selection of the most perfect for seed. The flesh of this Pumpkin is the 
most solid, sweet and tender and thf quantitv of seed the fruit contains does not, even in 
the largest, exceed 2 ounces. For table use it cannot be excelled; it is equally as good if 
hot better than the Green Strippd Cashaw. For stock food it excels any other variety, is 
as prolific as the Kentucky Field and a long keeper. 

We have but a limited quantity of seed of this variety on hand, which we put up in 
packages at 10c. 



RICHARD FR0TSCH:ER SBKD CO., I/td. 



vu 







Frotscher Go's Long Mammoth Pumpkin. 



COI/UMBIA WHITE MAMMOTH ASPARAGUS. 

This is an entirely distinct variety, producing stout white and very tender sprouts, 
■which remain fit for use for quite a while. It is more robust and vigorous in habit than 
either Palmetto or Conover's Colossal, and produces stronger sprouts than any of them 
and fully as many. As the shoots are white and tender it is not necessary to plant the 
roots as deep as the Colossal, nor is it necessary to earth up in order to bleach them. This 
Asparagus will, when once known, become the leading variety for our Southern country. 
Roots of the above variet}' per loofi.oo. seed per lb. 6oc, per }{ lb. 25c., per package loc. 

Our Assortment of Sweet Peas. 

No other Flower has ever so captured the eyes and likewise the hearts of our Flower- 
loving ladies than this hardy and most beautiful of all annuals, '^The Sweet Pea." Beau- 
tiful free bloomers, as they are, they deserve a place in every garden, no matter how small 
and limited the- space, a place can always be found to grow a few% and amply will they pay 
in large quantities of their fragrant and delicately tinted flowers. Their popularity has 
been steadily increasing, and with full right, as there is no other known Flower that serves 
so well for decorating purposes as the Sweet Pea. 

On the table arranged in baskets or formed in loose bouquets for ladies to wear, or as 
boutoniers, they look equally well, and alone for this if nothing else they become great 
favorites with almost everybody. 

By special arrangement with one of the principal Sweet Pea growers we have been 
able to secure the following beautiful collection, which we sell in separate packages or 
mixed : 

Adonis. Rosy Carmine, wings large with purplish tinge. An early and very abun- 
dant bloomer. 

Alba Magnifica. Pure white, with tinge of yellowish green in back of standard. 
Vigorous grower and good bloomer. 

Apple Blossom. Rosy pink, lighter at the base; wings lighter than standard. 
Flower very large and handsome. 

Blanche Ferry. Bright pink, wings large, rounded and nearly w^hite. Flowers of 
medium size; plant dwarf and free blooming. 

Blushing Beauty. Flowers exceedingly large and of perfect form. Of a beautiful, 
delicate, soft pink. 



viii THE SEED ANNUAI< OF THE 



Boreatton. One of the darkest and richest colored. Rich satin-like maroon, wings 
same color with a sligiit tingue of blue. 

Butterfly. A combination of shades of violet and lavender, wings deeper at the 
edge. Plant dwarf and abundant bloomer. 

Captain of the Blues. Bright purple blue, wings lighter and brighter blue. 
Flow-er stems long and usually producing three blossoms each. 

Cardinal. Intense crimson scarlet, wings large, broad and deeper in color. A fine 
bloomer. 

Countess of I/adnor. Beautiful shade of lavender; flowers large and perfect. 

Deligfht. Small but graceful flower, delicately shaded pink. 

Dorothy Tennant. Warm violet shaded flowers with incurved standard and very 
large rounded wdngs. Very effective. 

Duchess of Edinburgh. Deep rosy carmine; wings darker than standard and very 
large. 

Duke of Clanrece. Rosy claret; very fine. 

Emilie Henderson. Pure white; large flower of perfect form. The best of the 
whites. 

Fairy Queen. White, shaded with rose and marked with delicate violet lines. 

Firefly. Very bright and intense crimson scarlet, of good size and form. 

Gaiety. Striped with purple pink on light pink ground. Very fine. 

Her Majesty. Standard and wings beautifully curved and of bright rose pink 
color. / 

Igfnea. Rich magenta rose, wings darker. Ver}' brilliant. 

IndigfO King. Rich purplish maroon, wings lighter blue. 

Invincible Scarlet. An old variety of bright scarlet color; a very profuse bloomer. 

Invincible White. Similar to the above, but pure white. 

Katherine Tracy, The largest flowering variety. Delicate shade of light vermil- 
lion rose. 

I^ady Beaconfield. Bright salmon pink, wings primrose yellow. 

I/ady Pensjance. Rosy pink with a slight tinge of orange. Very beautiful. 

I/Cmon Queen. Delicate shade of very light rosy pink, with primrose yellow in 
the back. 

I/Ottie Eckford. Delicate shade of magenta blue, wirgs lavender deepenning to 
violet. 

Monarch. Rich maroon; wings very large, shaded with. blue. Rich color. 

Mrs. Eckford. Flowers primrose j^ellow, changing to white when fully open. 

Mrs. Gladstone. Brilliant, but soft rosy pink; wings large. Plants of dwarf habit. 

Mrs. I/ankey. Delicate shell pink; wings of find form and a little lighter than 
standard. 

Orange Prince. Pink suffused with yellow; wings bright light pink. 

Primrose. Yellowish white in front and primrose yellow in back; wings nearly 
white. 

Princess Beatrice. Bright rosy pink; wings ver}' large and well expanded. 

Princess of Wales. Striped purple on nearly white ground; wings lighter 
colored. 

Queen of England, Flowers clear white. Plant is a free bloomer. 

Queen of the Isles. Rose white, covered with stripes and splashes of deep rose 
red; wings striped with purple. 

Senator. Delicate lavender, striped with purplish maroon, wings striped with 
blue. 

Splendour. Rich purplish red, wings large, light blue. The finest and most effective 
variety. 

Venus. Delicate 5'et brilliant rosy pink. Plant a vigorous grower. Verj^ fine. 

Waverly. Rose pink and lavender, beautifully blended. Flowers large and well 
formed. 

Eckford'S Hybrids. Composed of the best varieties of Kckford's collection, and 
we doubt w'ether a better collection can be found. 

Our Own Collection is composed of the above 43 varieties, combined in such a 
manner as to give the best results. They will never fail to give satisfaction. 

Separate varieties, any of the above collection, loc. per package. 

The entire collection, |;2.oo. 

Our own mixture, loc. per package; per pound, 75c. 



The Improved Lone Star Water Melon is one of the best for our climate 
and deserves well to be cultivated. For description see page 55. 



RICHARD FROTSCHER SEED CO., Ltd. 



17 



Some seeds are sown at once in the beds where they should remain and mature; others 
again are sown in seed beds to be transplanted afterwards. Among the former are 
Carrots, Spinach, Turnip, Parsley, Cornsalad, Salsify, Parsnip and sometimes Beets; 
among the latter all varieties of Cabbage, Lettuce. Tomatoes, Eggplants, Pepper, etc. 
Small seeds should never be sown too deep, as they will either not come up or at least 
very sparingly. It often falls to the seedsmans" lot to be unnecessary accused of selling 
seeds which failed to germinate when the fault lays really with the gardener. As a 
rule to go by we would advise not to cover seeds more than twice their size with fine 
soil, or work them into that depth by means of a rake. Beans, Peas and Corn to the 
contrary should be covered from one to two inches and they will come up well, but 
here is a difference again: Wrinkled Peas and Sugar Corn have to be covered lighter 
and more carefully than Marrowfat Peas or the Common Varieties of Corn. The con- 
dition of the soil has to be taken into consideration also as well as the time of the year. 
For instance in heavy and wet soil seeds have to be covered lighter than in sandy and 
light ground. If such varieties of seeds as Carrots, Beets, Chard, etc. are sown during 
the summer they should be soaked over night in water and rolled in ashes or plaster 
before sowing they wnll come up quicker. The soil in the seed beds should be light 
enough not to bake after a rain. Some varieties of seed require shade during the hot- 
test part of the day, as for instance Cauliflower, Celery and Lettuce. Care should be 
taken to have the shade at least three feet from the ground; shade only when the sun 
has been on the bed for two or three hours, and remove it again early in the afternoon 
so that the plants may become sturd}'. If too much shaded they will be drawn up, long 
legged and not fit to set out in the open ground. • 

Lettuce seed should be sprouted during the hot months before sowing, otherwise 
the ants will carry it away before it has a chance to germinate. The most successful 
growers, in our vicinity, sow their Cabbage seed in the open ground towards the end of 
July or in August, and give them no shade, but water and keep the ground moist from 
the time of sowing until the plants are transplanted. Never should the seed be sown 
too thick, so that the plants are not crowded otherwise they will damp off easily. 

To sow Turnip seed on a large scale during the later part of summer and early 
fall, have your land well plowed and harrowed in advance and sow the seed just before 
or durmg a rain. Small beds which are easily watered may of course be sown at any 
time, but have to be kept moist. Continuous moisture during the time of germination, 
and a loose and well pulverized soil are necessary if seed is expected to come up well. 
Remember that the thinner Turnips are sown the finer they will be and the larger the 
yield. One pound of seed will amply. sow one acre. 

All finer varieties of seeds should be raked in carefully, while Beans, Peas and 
Corn are covered with a hoe. 

Some very fine seeds, like Thyme and Tobacco are covered enough when pressed in 
the ground by means of the back of a spade. 

Heavy washing rains, especiall}^ during the time when seeds are germinating are 
destructive to the seed bed and may, if the bed is small, be kept off by covering. 

If seeds, such as Beans. Melons, Cucumbers and Okra are planted too soon before 
the ground is warm enough, they are apt to rot during slightly wet weather. 

-4-4-^ ■ 



Standard Weig-ht of Seed. 



AlfalfaClover per bushel 60 lbs. 

Alsike Clover " 60 " 

Barley " 48" 

Beans " 60 " 

Broom Corn " 46 *' 

Buckwheat '« 48 " 

Canary Seed '* 60" 

Castor Beans " 46 " 

Clover Seed, Red " 60" 

White " 60 " 

" Crimson " 60 " 

" Japan •' 25 " 

" Burr, measured " 8 " 

Corn, shelled, Adams " 50" 

" Sugar, measured... " ... " 

Field " 56 " 

" on ear " 70 " 

Flaxseed " 56" 

Grass Seed, English Rye.. " 20" 

" Italian Rye " 20" 

" Mfadow Fescue " 15 " 

" Orchard " 14 " 

" Kentucky Blue " 14 " 

" Timothy " 45" 

" Hungarian " 48" 



Grass Seed Johnson p 

" Meadow Oat 

" Rescue 

Hemp Seed 

Irish Potatoes, heaped measure... 

Millet, German and Italian 

Mustard 

Oats • 

O^age Orange 

Onions 

Onion Sets 

Peas, Cow 

" English, smooth seed 

" " wrinkled 

Rape Seed 

Hye 

Radish Seed 

Sweet Potatoes 

Sorghum . • 

Sunflower, Russian 

'I'eoimte 

Turnip 

Wheat 

Vetch 



er bushel 25 

" 14 

14 
44 
60 

" 50 

58 
32 

" 33 

,54 
44 
60 
60 
.56 
60 
.56 

" 50 

56 
,50 
24 

" 50 

58 
60 
60 



lbs 



18 



THB sb:^d annuai, of the 




fif'^,Vinu!ii,)i; ill's' 






^mimi^^mmmmmm 



THE HOT BED. 

Hot beds in southern climate are, owing' to our open winters not as much used as 
up North, except perhaps for the purpose of forcing early Cucumbers and raising such 
tender plants as Eggplants, Tomatoes, and Peppers. Sometimes our gardeners force 
Lettuce in hot beds and Kohlrabi, but if we do not have any hard frosts, they will do 
better out of doors than under glass. 

To make a hot bed is a very simple thing, but to grow plants successfully in such a 
bed, the bed has to be well prepared previous to the time of sowing. Any one familiar 
with the handling of carpenter's tools can make a wooden frame by following the fol- 
lowing instructions. For instance to make a hot bed of three sashes in length, cut a board 
12 inches wide and i inch thick to a length of lo feet 4 inches^ to be used for the front 
wall of the frame, for the back part cut another board 18 inches wide and of the same 
length and for both sides the pieces should be 6 feet in length and have to be beveled 
off so as to correspond wdth the front and back walls in height. 

In this manner the bed will receive the proper slope. The sashes should be & feet 
in length and three and a half feet wide and will cover a frame of 6 feet wide by 10 feet 
6 inches in length. As a support to the sashes and at the same time a brace to the 
frame, laths of 2 inches wide should be nailed in the frame, 3 feet apart and flush 
with the front and back walls. None but fresh horse manure or at least such which is 
not over one month old, must be used as heating material in the bed. It should be 
thrown together in a heap, and when commencing to heat, be w-orked over with a fork 
so as to mix the long with the short part evenly. A good plan is to mix the manure on 
the same place where the hot bed is to be put up, spread part of it about 12 inches high 
and rather larger than the bed on the ground and set the frame on top of the layer of 
manure. The manure in the box has to be w^ell and evenly distributed and trampled 
down solid until the frame is filled to within 12 inches of the top. Care should be taken 
that in the corners and along the edges the manure is tightly pressed down and not 
hollow. Now put on your soil to a depth of about 6 to 8 inches. This soil should be 
light and rich, the best would be a mixture of well rotted manure and river sand. 
Before sowing or planting, let the soil become somewhat cooled offr which will take from 
about three to five days, stir up the soil a little and begin to sow or plant. During 
cold weather it is advisable to bank up the outside of the frame with fresh horse 
manure. 

When the young plants are up and the weather permits, sufficient of air should be 
given otherwise they become long legged and damp off. During cold nights the bed 
has to be covered so that the young plants receive no check in growths Covering should 
always be kept near on hand» 



RICHARD FROTSCHBR SEED CO., I^td. 



19 



Our Descriptive Catalogue ol Vegetable Seed 



FOR THE YEAR 1897. 



ARTICHOKE. 



Ai<CACHOFA (Sp. ), Carciofa (Ital.) 




Artichaut (Fr.), Artischoke (Ger.). 

l/SLtge Green Globe. This 
is a very popular vegetable in the 
vSouth. and much esteemed by the 
native as well as the foreign popula- 
tion from the South of Europe. It is 
extensively cultivated for the New 
Orleans market. It is best propa- 
gated from suckers, which come 
up around the large plants. Take 
them off during the fall and early 
winter months; plant them four feet 
apart each wa}^ Every fall the 
ground should be manv;red and 
spaded or plowed between them; 
at the same time the suckers should 
be taken off. Sow in drills during 
winter or early spring, three inches 
apart and one foot from row to 
row, cover with about one-half 
inch of earth. The following fall 
the plants can be transplanted and 
and cultivated as recommended 
above. The seeds we offer are im- 
ported by us from Italy, and of 
superior quality; we can also fur- 
nish sprouts or plants in the fall of 
the year at $1.50 per too. 

ASPARAGUS. 

ASPERGE (Fr. ), SpargEi. (Ger ), Esparagos (Sp.), SparaGio (Ital.) 

Conover's Colossal. The Asparagus is not extensively cultivated in the South; 
not that it is not liked well enough, but from the fact that it does not succeed as well 
as in more Northern latitudes. It seems that it is short-lived, the roots giving out soon 
or throwing up very small shoots. 

The ground should be well manured and prepared before either the roots or seeds 
are planted. For this climate the sowing of seed is preferable. Roots are generally 
imported from the North, and we find that the roots raised here, one year old. are as strong 
as those received from the North, three 3?ears old. Plant the seed in earl}^ spring. Soak 
over night in water; plant in rows, or rather hills, one foot apart and two feet between, of 
three if to be cultivated with a plow; put from four to five seeds in each hill; when well up 
thin out to two plants. The following winter, when the stalks are cut off cover with a 
heavy coat of well rotted manure and a sprinklin^f of salt; fishbrine will answer the 
same purpose. In the spring folk in manure between.the rows, and keep clean of 
weeds. The same treatment should repeated ever}^ year. The bed should not be cut 
before being three y^^ars established. Care must be taken not to cut the stalks too soon 
in the fall of the year — not until we have had a frost. If cut before, it will cause the 
roots to throw up young shoots, which will weaken them. Roots, 75c per 100; |6.oo per 
rooo. 

Palmetto. An excellent variety especially adapted to the South, but since they 
were only a year ago introduced here, they are not sufficiently known yet. We recom* 
mend them highly. Roots, 75c per 100; $6.00 per 1000. 



Green Globe Artichoke, 



If ivill always be our aim to look after the interest of our 

patrons. 



20 



THE sb:^d annuai, of the 



BEANS. 

(Dwarf Snap or Bush.) 

Haricot (Fr.), Bohne (Ger.), Frijoi^knano (Sp.), Fagioi.0 Basso (Ital.) 

CULTURE. 

Place in rows eighteen inches apart; drop a bean every two or thre^ inches. Plant 
from end of February, and for succession, every two or three weeks to May. Bush Beans 
planted in this latitude during June and July, will not produce much. August and Sep- 
tember are good months in which to plant again; they will produce abundantly till 



killed by the frost 

Pride of Newton. 
Early Mohawk Six Weeks 
Early Yellow Six Weeks. 
White Kidney. 
Red Kidney. 
Best of All. 
Improved Valentine. 
Extra Early Refugee. 

Pride of Newton. This is a 
robust, strong growing bean 
with long flat pods, which are 
light green. It is quite early 
and productive. The bean is 
similar to the Yellow SixWeeks 
in color, but much hardier. 

Early Mohawk Six 
Weeks. A long podded vari- 
ety, and very hardy. It is used 
to a large extent for the market 
for the first planting; very pro- 
ductive. 

Early Yellow Six Weeks. 
This is the most popular sort 
among market gardeners. Pods 
flat and long; a very good bear- 
er, but not so good for shipping 
as the Mohawk or Valentine. 

White Kidney. A good 
strong growing variety, not 
much planted. 

Red Kidney. A kind large- 
ly planted for the New Orleans 
market. It is a coarse growing 
variety, and much used for 
shelling when the pods turn yel- 
low, so that the beans are well 
developed, but yet soft. 

Best of All. A variety from 
Germany of great merit. It is 
green podded, long and succu- 
lent; very prolific and well fla- 
vored. Excellent for shipping 
and family use. Although not 
quite so early as the Mohawk*, 
it is of superior quality for ship- 
ping, and therefore, almost the 
only kind planted here for that 
purpose. The cut is agood rep- 
resentation as it grows; it shows 
only two-thirds of its natural 
size. Cannot be too highly rec- 
ommended. 



Do not cover the seeds more than two inches. 



Improved Prolific Dwarf German Wax 
GrenelVs Improved Golde?i Wax. 
Detroit or Rust Proof Wax Beans. 
Wai^dwelVs Dwarf Kidyiey Wax. 
Dzvajf Flageolet Wax. 
Henderson'' s Bush Lima Beans. 
Burpee's Bush Lima. 




Pride of Newton Bean. 



Wane but first-class tested Garden Seed, suitable for 
Southern climate sold by our firm. 



the 



RICHARD FROTSCHBR SBBD CO., Ltd. 



2f 



Improved Valentine. This variety 
has all the good qualities of the old Valen- 
tine; only it is ten days earlier, a great con- 
sideration when planted for the market; it 
has taken the place of the old variety of 
Valentine. 

Kxtra Karly Refugee. Is an im- 
provement on the well-known old Refugee. 
Very early and prolific. Owing to its good 
(jualities, it has become a favorite with 
market gardeners for shipping. Pods round 
and fleshy. 

Improved Prolific Dwarf German 
Wax. This variety is a great improvement 
on its parent, the Dwarf German Wax. 
Pods are longer and more productive. 

Grenell's Improved Rust Proof 
Golden Wax Beans. An improvement 
on the Dwarf Golden Wax Beans; the seed 
is identically the same in color as that kind. 
The pods are straight, long, and fleshier 
than Golden Wax, superior in quality and 



positively ""Rust Proofs'''' quite an object 
with us here in the vSouth, when we often 
have rainy weather in the Spring, which is 
injurious to most wax beans. The origina- 
tor also claims it to be more prolific and har- 
dier than the ordinary Golden Wax Bean. 

We had this bean thoroughly tried and 
found it so superior to the ordinary Golden 
Wax, that we have concluded to drop the 
last named variety from our list. 

Detroit or Rust Proof Wax 
Beans. This splendid wax bean is of re- 
cent introduction; and is very productive 
and hardy; pods straight, flat and some- 
what broader than the Dwarf Golden Wax. 
The beans, when well grown, are of a beau- 
tiful golden yellow. The originator claims 
that when tried side by side with the ma- 
jority of wax beans, it had never '''spotted 
or ritsted^^ while most of the other varieties 
were unsalable. Heclaims it to be the best 
bean for shipping. 




JVo novelties offered by us, unless tried for at least one season 

on our trial {f rounds* 



THE SKEB ANNUAL OF THE 




Burpee's Bush Lima. 



Good Seeds and good cultivation are essential to raise good crojys. 



RICHARD FROTSCHBR Sl^BD CO., I,td. 



23 





Wardwell's Dwarf Kidney Wax. 

Undoubtedly the best dwarf Wax Eean in 
cultivation; it is quite early; the pods are of 
similar shape as the Golden Wax, but long- 
er; color of a beautiful golden yellow. They 
are very prolific and hardy, surpassing any 
other Dwarf Wax Bean that we know of. 
The color of the bean is somewhat like the 
Golden Wax, but more kidney-shaped and 
more spotted with dark purple. It has 
done best here among the Dwarf Wax 
Beans. Of all the many new kinds we had 
tried. We found none to excel it. 

Dwarf Flageolet Wax. . A German 
variety which figures as Perfection Wax, 
also Scarlet Flageolet Wax in some cata- 
logues. It is a robust growing sort with 
large fine yellow pods. For several years 
we have tried to introduce it amongst the 
gardeners who still give the WardwelV s 
Kidney the preference. 

Henderson's Bush I/ima Beans. 

This is a dwarf Butter Bean which requires 
no poles, it grows from i8 to 24 inches high. 
It is early and productive. It should be 
caWeA Dwarf Carolina or Sewee Bean, as 
the pods are the size of that variety. Re- 
commend same for family use, or where it 
is difficult to obtain poles. 

Burpee's Bush I/ima. The pods are 
of same size as the Large Pole lyima and of 
same flavor. It is a stronger grower than 
the Henderson's Bush Lima. 



Best of all Beans, -3 natural size. 



JS^o inisrepresentatioti in our establlsJimentf all seeds are true 
to name and of tindotihted gerniinating qualities. 



24 



THE S:eED ANNUAI^ OF THE 



BEANS. 

POLE OR RUNNING. 
Haricots A Rames (Fr.)! Staxgex Bohxex (Ger.)- Frijolo Vastago. (Spax.). Fag- 

lOLo Alto t Ital. ) 
CULTURE. 
Lima Beans should not he planted before the ground has become warm in spring. 
Strong poles ought to be set iti the ground from four to six fee^ apart, and the ground 
drawn around them before the seed is planted. It is always best to plant after a ram and 
with the eye of the bean down. The other varieties can be planted flat, and not more 
than three to four feet apart, and hilled after they are up. Do not cover the seeds more 
than two inches; one inch is enough for the Southern Prolific and Crease Back. 



rich ground, and 



long: 



Large Lima. 

Carolina or Sewee. , 

Southern Willow-leaved Sewee or Butter 

Dutch Case Knife. 

I/arg"e I/ima. A well-known and ex- 
cellent variety. It is the best shell bean 
known. Should have 
plent}' room to grow. 

Carolina or Sewee. A variety similar 
to the Lima; the onh- difference is. the 
seeds and pods are smaller. Ic is generally 
cultivated, being more productive than the 
Large Lima. 

Southern Willow-leaved Sewee or 
Butter. This is a variety which is grown 
by the market gardeners about New Or- 
leans; the pods and beans are the same as 
the Sewee or Carolina Bean; it is quite dis- 
tinct in the leaves, being narrow like the 
willow. It stands the heat better than any 
other Butter Bean, and is very productive. 
Originated here and in strictly a Southern 
variety. 

Dutch. Case Knife. A very good pole 
bean; it is early; pods broad and 
somewhat turned toward the end. 

Crease Back. A variety of Pole Beans 
which has been cultivated m the South for 
a long time, but has never come into the 
trade until about ten years ago. It is an 
excellent bean, earlier than the ''Southern 
Prolific." Seeds white; pods round, with a 
crease in the back, from which the name. 
It is a good grower, bears abundant!}', and, 
if shipped, will keep better than most 
other kinds. It sells better in the soring 
than, an}* other for shipping purposes; and 
when in season cannot be surpassed. For 
early summer, the Southern Prolific is pre- 
ferable, standing the heat better. Several 
years ago we received half a bushel from 
near Mobile, Ala., and all the beans of this 
variety in the whole country can be traced 
back to this half bushel. We supplied two 
growers in Georgia where it was not known 
that time. There is a light brown bean 
streaked and mottled with dark brown and 
black of the same name; but it is not equal 
to the white variety. In some localities this 
kind is called "Calico Crease Back." The 
white seeded variety is also known in some 
sections by the name of 'Fat Horse.'" This 
is the original stock; the quality is so fine 
that 'no improvement can be made on it. 



Southern Prolific. 

Crease Back. 

Lazy Wife's. 

GoldeJi Wax Flageolet. 




White Crease Back Pole Beans. 



Nowhere can Seed of equal hir/h quality he ohtained for less 
money than at the Old JReliable Standi 521 to 525 

D u ma ine St7^eet, 



RICHARD FROTSCHKR SBED CO., I,td. 



25 



Golden Wax Flageolet. An excel- 
lent variety introduced a few years ago, 
from Germany. After several years' exper- 
ience we can confirm all that is claimed for 
it. It is the best Wax Pole Bean in culti- 
vation, surpasses in length and delicacy of 
flavor all other Wax varieties. It is a very 
strong grower, which is wanting by most of 
the Wax Pole kinds. It bears abundantly, 
is entirely stringless,and does not spot, even 
by too much rain or other untoward weather. 




Golden Wax Flageolet Pole Beans. 



Can not be too highly recommended 
The Golden Wax Pole Bean, brought out a 
few years ago, we have dropped, as it can 
stand no comparison with the Golden Wax 
Flageolet. 

Southern Prolific. No variety will 
continue longer to bear than this. It 
stands the heat of summer better than any 
other, and is planted to succeed the other 
kinds. It is a very strong grower; pods 
about seven inches long and flat; seeds are 
dark yellow or rather light brown. The 
standard variety for the New Orleans 
market, for late spring and summer. 

If planted in July or August it will con- 
tinue to bear until frost sets in. 

IfSiZy Wife's. A Pole Bean from Penn- 
sylvania. The pods are entirely stringless, 
4 — 5 inches long, and have a fine flavor 
when cooked. They retain their rich flavor 
until nearly ripe. The beans are white, and 
fine as a shell bean. 




Lazy Wife's Pole Beans. 



JS^o tohere can seed of equal high quality be obtained for 
less money than at the Old Reliable Standi 
521 to 525 Dumaine Sreet, 



26 



THE SEED ANNUAI/ OF THE 



ENGI/ISH or HORSE BEANS. 

CouRGANNE or Fkve de Marais (Fr.), Puff Bohne (Ger-), Haba Comun (Sp.) 

Fava (ItalJ 



Broad Windsor. Not so much culti- 
vated here as in some parts of Europe. It 
is much liked b}- the people of the Southern 
part of Europe. Ought to be planted in 



drills 2j feet apart, every 6 inches one bean 
during November; as, if planted in the 
spring, they will not produce m.uch. 



Betrave (Fr. \ Salatruben' (G. 



BEETS. 

;r. ). Remdlacha 
CULTURE. 



(Sp. ) Barba Biettoi.a (Ital.) 



The ground for beets should be rich and well spaded or plowed. Sow in drills 
twelve to eighteen inches apart, cover the seed about one inch deep. When about a 
month old. thin them out to four or six inches apart. In this latitude beets are sown 
from Januar}- till the end of April, and from the middle of July till the middle of Nov- 
ember; in fact, some market gardeners sow them every month in the year. In the sum- 
mer and fall it is well to soak the seeds over night and roll in plaster before sowing. 



Extra Early or Bassano. 
Dewing' s Earlv Red Tur?iip. 
Ea rly Blood Tu rn ip . 
Edinond's Early Blood Turnip. 
Lons: Blood. 
Half Long Blood. 
Egyptian Red Turnip. 

Extra Early or Bassano, is the ear- 
liest variety, but not popular on account of 
its color, which is almost white when boil- 
ed. Earliness is not of such value here, 
where there are beets sown and brought to 
the market the whole year round. In the 
North it is different, where the first crop of 
beets in the market in spring will bring a 
better price than the varieties which mature 
later. 

Dewing's Early Red Turnip. This 
is earlier than Ihe Blood Turnip, smooth 
skin and of light red color; planted a good 
deal bj- the market gardeners about New Or- 
leans. 

Early Blood Turnip. The mcst popu- 
lar variety for market purposes as well as 



Sti?ison's Iinpioved. 

Long Red Al angel IVurzel. 

White Erench Sugar. 

Silvet or Szuiss Chard. 

Eclipse. 

Lentz. 

Crosby's Egyptian Red Ttirnip. 

family use. It is of a dark red color and 
ver\ tt nder. This is the principal variety 
planted for shipping. Our stock is raised 
for us from dark selected smooth roots, and 
cannttbe excelled. 

Esmond's Early Blood Turnip 
Peet- A well selected variety; regular in 
shape; deep blood skin, dark flesh of excel- 
lent quality. Small tap root and small top. 

lyOng Blood. It is not quite so tender 
as the foregoing variety; and therefore not 
planted at all for the market, and very little 
for family use. In the North it is chiefly 
planted for winter use; here wehaveTurnip 
Beets the whole winter from the garden; 
therefore it has not the same value. 





E.irly Blood Turni]) Beet. 



Mlver Beet or Swiss Chard, 



Sinioii's Early Red Turnip Beet. 



JSo nilsrejfresentatfoii in out' establish menf. ah seeds are true 
to name, and of andoubted (jertuitiatiuff qualities. 



RICHARD FROTSCHER SEED CO., I,td. 



27 




Egyptian Red Turnip Beet. 



Half I/Ong Blood. A very dark red 
variety of a half long shape; a good kind 
for family use. 

Egyptian Red Turnip. This is a well 
known variety, very earl}', tender, deep 
red and of Turnip shape. Leaves of this 
variety are smaller than of others. The 
seeds are also much smaller. We recom- 
mend it and consider it a good acquisition. 
It increases in popularity every year. 

Crosby's Egyptian Beet. An im- 
provement on the foregoing sort; being of 
more uniform shape and color. Recom- 
mend same highly; it will take the place of 
the old variety for market purpoeses. 

Eclipse. A new beet from Germany, 
very regular, of globular shape. It has a 
small top. is of dark red blood color, sweet 
and fine grained flesh. It comes earlier 
than the Egyption. 

Lentz. A Strain of Blood Turnip Beet 
which originated with one of the most pro- 
minent market gardeners around Philadel- 
phia. This beet, as selected and grown by 
him, has had a great reputation in the sur- 
roundings of the above place, but the seed 
has been carefully guarded and kept until 
recentlj', when it fell into the hands of a 
seed grower, from whom we have received 
our supply. It is fully as earl}' as the Egyp- 
tian Beet, but larger and of better quality; 
and it has a fine turnip form with smooth 




Eclipse Beet 



O^od Seeds and (food cultivation cire essential to raise good. 

crops. 



28 



TH:e SEED ANNUAI, OF THE^ 




roots, dark blood red flesh. 

sweet at all times, never 

and stringy, even when old. The cut is 

an exact representation of its shape. 



tender and 
becoming tough 



Stinson's Blood 



variety of fine 



globular 



Turnip. A new 

shape and dark 
blood red color. It is said to be almost as 
early as the Bassanno and no doubt will be 
an excellent shipping variety. It has been 
tried here and 



gave entire satisfaction. 



IfOng Red Mangel Wntzel, This 

raised for stock; it grows to a large 



is 
size. 
Here in the South where stock is not stab- 
led during the winter, the raising of root 
crops is much neglected. Being very pro- 
fitable for feeding it ought to be more cul- 
tivated. 



White French Sugar Beet. 



White Frencli Sugfar is used the same 
as the foregoing; not much planted. 

Silver Beet or Swiss Chard. This 
variety is cultivated for its large succulent 
leaves, which are used forthe same purposes 
as Spinach. It is very popular in the New 
Orleans market. 



BOR]eCOI/:e OR CURI/l^D KAIvE. 

Choux-vert (Fr.),GRUE;xER Kohi. (Ger.), Breton (Sp.) Cavolo BRETToxicoCItal.) 

Dwarf German Greens. A vegetable highly esteemed in the Northern part of 
Europe, but very little cultivated in this country. It requires frost to make it good for 
the table. Treated the same as cabbage. 

BROCCOI/I. 

Choux Brocoli (Fr.). SpargevKohl (Ger.), Brocui,i 
(Sp.) Cavolo Broccoi.1 (Ital.) 

Purple Cape. Resembles the Cauliflower, but not 
forming such compact heads, and not quite so white, 
being of greenish cast. We raise such fine Cauliflower 
here that verj* little Broccoli is planted. 

The Purple Cape is the most desirable variety; culti- 
vated the same as Half Early Cauliflower; further North 
than New Orleans, where Cauliflower does not succeed, 
the BroccDli miv be 



substituted being hardier. 



BRUSS:i5I/S SPROUTS. 

Choux de BruxeIvI<es (Fr.), Rosex Kohl (Ger.) Bre- 
ton deBruselas (Sp.), Cavoeo di Brussel (Ital.) 

A vegetable cultivated the same as Cabbage, but ver}' 
little known here. The small heads which appear along 
the upper part of the stalk between the leaves, make a 
fine dish when well prepared. Should be sown during 
August and September. 




Brussels Sprout. 



Polite ClerkSf ivell up hi their pvofession, and Strict Attention 

to the ivants of our JPatronSf will he our Assistance 

to gain your Patronage, 



RICHARD FROTSCHE^R SBBD CO., I/td. 



29 



CABBAGB. 

Choux Pomme [Fr.] Kopfkohi. [Ger.], Repoli^o [Sp.] Cavoi^o Cappuccio (Ital). 

CULTURE. 

Cabbage requires a strong, good soil, and should be heavily manured. To grow 
good Cabbage in poor worn out soil or without working the plants well is impossible. In 
our climate it is possible to sow Cabbage almost during the entire year, provided the 
varieties for the different seasons are selected; but for a main fall and winter crop, seed 
should not be sown before the month of July and from then up to September. Some- 
times if the weather is favorable, we may sow in June, but as plants sown at that time, 
grow rapidly they generall}'- get too large before there is a chance to transplant them. 
September is the worst month to sow Cabbage, as it generally happens that the plants 
sown during this month are ready to head when cold weather sets in and will invari- 
ably run into seed. 

For our main spring crop, Cabbage seed should be sown from the end of October until 
the end of November or even later, if the weather permits. In somesections, especially 
at Frenier, where undoubtedly the best Cabbage in IvOuisiana is grown, Spring Cabbage 
is the only kind that is cultivated and generally with great success. The principal 
variety used for a spring crop at Frenier is the L^arge Flat Brunswick. 

During winter and early spring the earlier pointed variety may be sown in a cold 
frame and set out when large enongh for an early sumaier crop. Any one sowing Cab- 
bage in July or August for an early winter crop has to content with a great many draw- 
backs, and it often happens, that in spite of all precautions, the quantity of plants suc- 
cessfully raised from a pound of seed is a very limited one. Hot weather, and above all 
insects, etc. are the greatest enemies to battle with, and it requires the closest atten- 
tion and strict vigilance of the gardener in order to succeed. 




See our ueiv '^JPride of the South Cabbage^' in our Novelty 

List and give it a trial. 



so 



THE se:^d annual of the 



Cabbage seed should be sown thinly on well prepared seed beds, and slightly 
covered, it must be watered several times during the day, ev^^n while the sun beams 
down on the beds, as there is no danger of scalding the 5'oung p ants. The gardeners 
have for a long time been in the habit of usitg chopped up Tobacco Stems or ribs, 
which they strew over the beds shortly after the seed is sown and before the plants are 
up. But on account of constant watering the steams are soon leached out and lose 
their strength. We would advocate the use of Tobacco Dust, which is quite harmless to 
vegetable life, a good insecticide and may be applied whenever it is deemed necessary. 



Early York. 
Early Large York. 
Early Large Oxheart. 
Early Winning stadk. 
Jersey Wakefield, 
Early Flat Dutch. 
Early Drumhead, 
Large Flat Brunswick. 
Improved Early Summ,er. 



Improved Large Late Drumhead. 

Frotscker' s Superior Late Flat Dutch. 

Crescent City Late Flat Dutch. 

Stein's Early Flat Dutch. 

Red Dutch {for pickling. ) 

Green Globe Savoy. 

Early Dzuarf Savoy. 

Drumhead Savoy. 

St. Dennis, or Chou Bonneuil. 



Superior I/ate Flat Dutch. This is 
the most popular variety for winter cab- 
bage, and cultivated by almost every gar- 
dener who plants for the New Orleans mar- 
ket. Our stock is of superior quality, and 
we venture to say that seventy-five per cent 
of all cabbage sold in the New Orleans mar- 
ket are of seeds which have been obtained 
from our store. During winter and spring 
specimens which are brought as samples to 
our establishment, weighing from fifteen to 
twenty -five pounds, can frequently be seen. 
In regard to the time of planting, see re- 
marks under the head of "Cabbage" in the 
directions for planting for July. We have 
tried seed of the flat Dutch from different 
growers, but have found none 3'et to equal 
the stock which is raised for us by contract. 

Improved I^arge I^ate Drumhead' 

iPine large variety; should be sown early in 
the fall for winter, or during December and 
January for late spring use; it will stand 
more cold than the Brunswick. 



I^arge Flat Brunswick. This is a late 
German variety, and has been brought to 
the South 30 3^ears ago. It is an excellent 
kind, and when well headed up, the shape 
of it is a true type of a premium Flat Dutch 
Cabbage. Requires very rich ground if 
sown for winter crop, and should be sown 
early, as it is a little more susceptible of 
frost than the Superior Flat Dutch. It is 
well adapted for shipping, being very hard, 
and does not wilt so quick as others. At 
Frenier, on the Ills. Cent. R. R., this is the 
kind principally planted, and is preferred 
over all other varieties. Thejjeople living 
there plant nothing else but cabbage, and 
have tried nearly all highly recommended 
varieties, and this is their choice. At that 
place the seeds are sown in October and 
November. The bulk of the cabbage raised 
there is shipped North in April and Ma}-, 
and is the finest which comes to the Chicago 
market. 





Improved Large Drumhead, 



Large Flat Bruuswick. 



Our Cahhage Seeds are the best selected and most suit able for 

our climate and soil. 



RICHARD FROTSCHER SK^D CO., I,td. 



31 




('resccnt City Flat Dutch. 

Solid South. A cabbage introduced by 
C. L. Allen, one of the leading cabbage 
growers oh Long Island. It is of the same 
season as the Early Summer, but more 
regular in shape than that variety, and 
very hard heading; the crop can be cut 
almost at one time. 




v«^ 



Early Flat Dutch. 

Swf cession. This cabbage is of recent 
introduction; It resembles the German 
Brunswick; but not quite so large, and is 
of same season. It heads up very regularly 
and uniform; should be planted same time 
as the Early Summer and Brunswick for a 
spring crop. 




Early Drumhead. 



Stein's Early Flat Dutch. 

Crescent City Flat Dutch. This 
variety has been sold for the past few years 
under the name of No. i. It is the most 




Improved Early Summer. 

uniform heading cabbage suitable for this 
section; heads are large and solid. About 
two weeks earlier than Superior Late Flat 
Dutch. Recommend same highly. 




Large York. 



We iJo not J) uy frofn, dealer Sf but have all Cabbage seeds grown 
)cr our own trade and of best selected stock. 



32 



THB s:bed annuaiv of the 



Steiti'3 Early Flat Dutch Cabbage. 

This is one of the earliest cabbages for its 
size. The demand for the seed has increas- 
ed almost double since last year. It is a 
sure header, very regular and well adapted 
for shipping. lb planted exclusive of all 
other kinds, by some of the largest cabbage 
growers in this vicinity. 

Improved Early Summer. This cab- 
bage is of recent introduction. It is not 
quite so large as the Brunswick; for fall it 
can be sown in August; for spring, in Novem- 
ber and as late as January, heads up very 




Early Tort. 

uniform and does not produce many outside 
leaves. It is hardier than the Brunswick, 
and stands the cold and heat better. The 
seed we offer is the best strain cultivated, 
and can be planted closer together than the 
late varieties —say about Sooo to the acre. 
The finest crop of this variety (one hundred 
and iifty thousand heads of cabbage! We 
ever saw. was raised a few years ago near 
the city, The growler could commence on 
one end of the row to cut. and continue to 
the end. all well headed. They averaged 
about 7 pounds. 




Barly Drumhead. A similar variety 
to the above; a little earlier, and not mak- 
ing as many leaves, it can be planted close. 
A good early spring cabbage. 

St. Denis, or Chou Bonneuil. This 
was. at one time, one of the most popular 
varieties grown for this market, but during 
the past few years has not done so well as 
formerlv, and is. therefore, planted very 
little. 



St. DcBis or Chon BoBneuil. 

Early Flat Dutch. An intermediate 
kind between the early pointed and late 
varieties. It is not, on an average, as heavy 
as the Oxheart or Winningstadt; but. if 
raised for the market, more salable on ac- 
count of being fiat. Very Good variety for 
familv use. 




EarlT Larsre Oxheart, 



Large York. 

later than the 

not grown for the market 

for familv use. 



About two or three weeks 



above, forming hard heads; 
Recommended 



Early York. An early variet}-, but 
very little grown here except for family use. 
As we have cabbage heading up almost the 
whole year, it has not the same value as in 
Northern climates, where the first cabbage 
in spring brings a good price. 




Early Winningstadt. 

Early Large Oxheart. An excellent 

variet}-, which is later than the Large 
York, and well adapted for sowing in fall 
or earh' spring. 



Plants of the Leadhig Cabbage Varieties can be obtained from 

us at the jyvoj^er season. 



RICHARD I^ROTSCHER SEBD CO., Ltd. 



33 



Karly Winning-stadt. This is a very 
solid-heading variety; pointed, of good size 
and of the same season as the Oxheart. 
Very good for family use. But does not 
suit the market, as no pointed cabbage can 
be sold to any advantage in New Orleans. 

Jersey Wakefield. Very popular in 
the North, but little planted here. It is of 
niediuni^size and heads up well. 

Red Dutch. Mostly used tor pickling 
or salads. Very little cultivated. 

Batly Dwarf Savoy, Head rather 
small but solid; leaves very curled and suc- 
culent; of a dark green color. Very fine 
for family garden. 




Early Dwarf Savoy. 

Green Globe Savoy. Medium sized 
beads, not very hard, but all the leaves can 
be used. This and the following variety 
are of fine flavor, and preferred by many 
over the other kinds. 




Green Globe Savoy, 

Drumhead Savoy. I^eaves are wrink- 
led, but not quite so much as the two fore- 
going kinds. It grows to a good size with 
large roundish head. 







Drumhead Savoy. 



CAULIFLOWER. 



CHOUFI.EUR (Fr.), Bl^UMENKOHIv, (Ger.), CoivIFI^OR (Sp.), CavoIvO FiorE (Ital.) 

Cauliflower, which may be considered one of the finest of vegetables, does exceedingly 
well in the vicinity of New Orleans and especially on the Gulf Coast and the little Islands. 
Large quantities of this delicate plant are annually grown at Grand Isle and along Bara- 
taria Bay^ and it may be safely admitted that there is hardly a country, perhaps with the 
exception of the Mediterranean Sea Coast, that produces finer Cauliflower than the Gulf 
Coast of Louisiana, Mississippi and Texas. 

The Italian varieties, especially seem to thrive well at Grand Isle, producing beautiful 
snow white heads of enormous size; and although later, they are much hardier than the 
French and German kinds. 

CULTURE. 

The soil of Louisiana, especially along the Gulf and Lake Ponchartrain, seems to be well 
adapted to Cabbage and Cauliflower culture, and the salt atmosphere is to a large extent 
very beneficial to their growth. But not only on the Gulf Coast, fv>r in the immediate 
neighborhood of our city some fineCauliflowershave been raised, especially Algerian, Early 
Erfurt, LeNormand and Half Early Paris, but owing to the irregularity of our climate they 
are not always quite as sure as those along the coast. Cauliflower, according to varieties, 
ma}' be sown almost during the entire summer, beginning as early as the end of April with 
the Late Italian Giant and continuing with this variety up to the beginning of June. Dur- 
ing June and July the Early Italian Giant, the Malta and Short Stemmed Neapolitan 
should be sown, and during August, September, October and November, the Algerian, Le 
Normand. Early Erfurt and Half Early Paris. The Extra Early Paris, which may be 
considered one of the earliest, and the Early Snowball can be sown from November to 
February, or under favorable circumstances perhaps as late as March; although fall sowing 
is preferable. By sowing in May and June, and even some years in July and August we 
generally find it difficult to get a proper stand of plants, partly owing to the hot and unfav- 
orable weather and partly to the ravages of insects, hence, some gardeners advocate sow- 



All Cauliflower Seeds Imported direct from the Growers, 



34 



THE SEBD ANNTJAI, OF THK 



ing in shallow seed boxes which they keep on shelves or benches raised from the ground 
and transplanting the young plants, when large enough to be handled, into flower pots, 
from which, when established, they are placed into the open ground But this is too 
laborious a process and entirely impracticable for anyone that intends growing Cauliflower 
©n a large scale. 

We would rather advocate soAving in well prepared seed beds in the open ground, and 
when in a condition to be handled, pricking them out in beds, especially prepared for that 
purpose. The seed beds as well as the beds where the young" plants are pricked out in, 
must be kept moist; and as a guard against insects. Tobacco Dust or Slug Shot should be 
freely applied. Tobacco Dust is preferable, it is quite effective and above all harmless and 
a good fertilizer. 

When the young plants are large enough, the}' must be set out into their proper places. 
at the necessary <listance-apart according" to their growth. The late varieties, growing; 
larger, require more space, for instance 3 to 3)^ feet apart in the ro-ws and the rows 
sufficiently far enough to allow proper cultivation with a plow or cultivator; w^hile the 
earlier varieties may be planted closer. 

Cauliflowers require a rich but sand}' soil and must l:>e kept moist, esp^ecially during 
their growing season, and while forming their heads, and above all the ground must 
be ket^t clean of weeds and well cultivated. 



Extra Early Paris. 

Half Early Paris. 

Early Erjurt. 

Le Normands {short stemmed}. 



Large Algiers. 
Early Italian Giant. 
Late Italian Giant. 

Early Snoii^hall. 




Early Italian Giant Cauliflower. 



There is no part of tJie Globe that produces Finer Caulifloiver 
than Grand Isle, All Seed soivn in that Section comes 

front our Establishnient, 



RICHARD FROTSCHBR'S S^l^B CO., I.td. 



35 



^xtra Barly Paris. The earl- 
iest variety; headssniall. very tender. 

Half fearly Paris. The most 
popular in the New Orleans market. 
Heads; of good size, v^'hite and 
compact. 

J^arly Krfurt. This variety is of 
more dwarfish growth than the two 
former. Heads white and of good 
size- Heads with certaintj'. 

I/C Normands, is a French va- 
riety, and largely cultivated here. 
It stands uiore dry weather than the 
other varieties, and has large and 
pure white heads Not so popular as 
the Half Early Paris in this market, 
but there is no good reason why it 
should not be, as it is an excellent 
kind in every respect; stands the 
heat better than any other. 

i^arly Snowball. An extra early 
dwarf variety similar to the Dwarf 
Erfurt; good to sow for last in spring. 
It will produce flowers as early as 
the Extra Early Paris, but larger. 



Large Algiers. 





Le Normands Short- Stemmed Cauliftower, 

I/arge Algiers. A French va- 
riety of the same season as the Le 
Normands, but a surer producer. It 
is one of the be^jt kinds, andhas taken 
the place of other second early varie- 
ties since it has been introduced. 
The principal variety at Grand Isle. 

Barly Italian Giant. Very 
large fine sort, not quite so late as the 
Late Italian, and almost as large. 
The heads are quite large, white and 
compact, and of delicious flavor. We 
recommend it to all who have not tried 
it. When sown at the proper season, 
it will head with certainty, and will 
not fail to give satisfaction. 

I<ate Italian Giant. This is 
the largest of all Cauliflowers, and 
grown to a considerable extent in the 
neighborhood of New Orleans. It is 
very firm and compact; should not 
be sown latter than June, as it takes 
from seven to nine months before it 
heads. 



CARROT. 

Carrotte (Fr.), MoEHRE OR Gelbe Rube (Ger. ), Zanahoria (Sp.), Carot^A (Ital.) 
Requires a sandy loam, well manured the previous year, and deeply spaded up. Should 
be sown in drills ten to twelve inches apart, so the plants can be worked after they are up. 
Gardeners here generally sow them broad-cast, and often the roots are small from being 
crowded too much together. 



Early Scarlet Horn. 
Half Long Scarlet, French, 
Improved Long Orange. 
Long Bed without core. 



St. V^alene. 
LalfLong Luc, 
Danver'^s Intermediate, 
Chantenay Half Long Scarlet, 



Long Orange and Long Hed tvitliout Core Carrots are Excel- 
lent for Stock Food, 



m 



THIS SHEB ANNUAI^ OF TK]^ 





Early Scarlet Horn Carrot, 



Half Long Scarlet 
French Carrot, 



Karly Scarlet Horn. A short stump- 
rooted variety of medium size^ very early 
and of fine flavor. Not eultivated for the 
market. 





Half Long Lnc Carrot. 



Half IfOng Scarlet French. This is 
the most popular variety, and extensively 
grown for the market as well as for family 
use. It is a little later than the Earh^ Horn, 



St. Valerie Carrots 




Long Red Carrot without Core. 



Seventy-five per cent, of all the Celery grown in J^eiv Orleans 
and vicinity^ come froiin our Seeds, Give them a trial. 



RICHARD FROTSCHER SEED CO., I,td. 



37 



much larger, bright scarlet in color, and of 
fine flavor. 

Half I/Ong I/UC. An excellent variety 
from France. It is as early as any previous- 
ly mentioned, but stump-rooted and larger. 
Very smooth and of a fine color. 

Improved I/ong Orange. This is an 
old variety; roots long and of deep orange 
color. It is not much cultivated in this sec- 
tion, and the flavor is not so fine as that of 
the two preceding kinds. Valuable for field 
culture. 

St. Valerie. Also a French variety, 
bright red in color; a littlelarger and longer 
than the Half Long French, and stronger 
in the leaves. This is one of the finest 
carrots, and will in the course of time take 
the place of the Half Long. It is very 
smooth. 

I/ong Red, without core. A variety 
from France, which is of cylindrical shape, 
very smooth, bright scarlet color, and of 
fine flavor; has no heart or core. It is not 
quite so early as the Half Long, but more 
productive. Consider it a first-class variety 
for the table, and one that will come into 
general cultivation when better known. 

Danver's. An intermediate American 
kind of recent introduction. It is of a 
bright orange color; very smooth; sym- 




Danver's Intermediate Carrot. 

metrically formed; somewhat s':ump-rooted 
like the Half Long Luc. It will produce 
more in weight to the acre than any other 
Half Long variety. 

Chantenay Half Long Carrot. A 
half long scarlet variety; similar to the Half 
Long Luc, but thicker. 



c:^LERY. 

Cki<KRY (Fr.), SkIvI^ERIE (Ger.), Apio (Sp.), Appio (^Ital.;. 

Celery is a very important crop in this section and usually a well paying one, although 
the cultivation of same has a great deal of labor connected with it. 

The varieties which will do w^ell here, are not so many as perhaps up North or West, 
and it is therefore essential only to select such kinds as are adapted to our climate and 
soil and may be grown profitably here. 

CULTIVATION. 

Celery is generally sown here during the months of May and June for early, and 
during August and September for late market. In order to raise the plants successfully 
the seed beds should be well prepared and have a good position. A bed under a large tree 
and being partly shaded is preferable; but where it cannot be had, some preparations should 
be made to shade the former. 

An open cold frame with well worked light or partly sandy soil or even muck would 
answer very well. 

If the seed is sown in an open bed, a sort of a frame should be made about i8 or 20 
inches high, over which cotton may be stretched during the hottest part of the day, which 
will sufficiently shade the bed. 

The seed should be sown thin, as the young plants, if sown too thick, are apt to be- 
come spindly and damp off. The seed bed has to be kept moist, otherwise the seed will 
germinate irregular or only partly; it is best to water well in the evening with a watering 
pot having a good rose; if the weather should be hot and dry, it will be necessary to water 
oftener, say twice a day, morning and evening; as nothing is more disastrous to Celery 
seed than when the bed becomes too dry during the time of germination. 

The canvas covering should never be put on the seed bed before 9 o'clock in the 
morning; nor should it be left on after 4 o'clock in the evening; as too much shade is as 
bad if not worse than none at all. When the plants are up and have the first two leaves, 
they should be gradually accustomed to the sun. which is effected by putting on the shade 
every day a little later and taking it ofiFa little earlier in the evening. When the young plants 
are large enough, say about 5 to 6 inches, they should be set out. Previous to transplant- 

To soiv Seeds of Poor Quality , no matter hotv Cheapf is but Time 
and Labor lost, and consequently, very dear at the end. 



38 



THE SEED ANNUAL OF THE 



ing, the beds should be well prepared; if the land is not rich enough it may be enriched in 
a very simple manner by opening ditches from 3 to 4 feet apart, throwing out the ground 
both ways with a plow, and filling in well rotted manure, afterwards mixing it in well with 
the soil. Open trenches about four inches deep where the manure has been dug in and 
set out your plants in there, about 6 inches apart. Water them well and shade by means 
of cotton cloth or Latania leaves, during hot weather, until well started; this shading 
has to be done as mentioned before. 

In setting out it is necessary' to cut the tops of the plants, also part of the roots as this 
win insure their taking root easily. When the plants have once started growth, the beds 
must be hoed and kept clean of weeds. Liquid manure or soap-suds are very beneficial for 
Celery plants and should be applied as often as either can be had. When the 3-oung plants 
are large enough, hilling up should be begun with in order to bleach them. This takes up 
considerable time as it has to be done repeatedly as the plants increase in size and growth. 
If Celery is planted on a large scale, this earthing up may be done by means of a plow or 
Celery hiller which is expressly constructed for that purpose and saves considerable labor. 

Here of late, some of our large Celer\' growers bleach their plants with planks or 
boards; this is done by placing planks, i inch thick by 12 inches wide, on both sides of 
the rows and which are held tYiere b}' banking up the ground against them. This is a very 
convenient w^ay and saves much labor; but the Celer}- blanched in this manner is not as 
tender and has not the same flavor as that which is blanched in the old fashioned way. that 
is by earthing up. 



L a rge Wh He Solid. 
Perfection Hartwell. 
Turnip- Rooted. 
Dwarf Large Ribbed. 




Golden Self Blanching. 
Giant Pascal. 
Cuttiiig or Soup. 




Large White Solid O'elerv. 



Dwarf. Large Kibbed Celery. 

Large White Solid. This variety used 
to be planted exclusively, but since the in- 
troduction of half dwarf and dwarf kinds, 
it has been dropped. more so by market gar- 
deners. It is crisp, but not as fine flavored 
as the following kinds. 



Fair and Honest Dealings are out' Motto, 



RICHARD FR0TSCH:^R SniB^B CO., I/td. 



39 




Perfection Hartwell Celery. 



Dwarf Large Ribbed. This 
kind was brought here several 
years ago from France. It is 
short, but very thick ribbed, 
solid and of fine flavor. The 
best dwarf variety for this sec- 
tion. 

Golden Self Blanching. 
A French variety, of the best 
quality. The heart is solid, very 
tender, of a beautiful yellow 
color; the ribs brittle and of a 
delicious flavor. Can not be 
loo highly recommended. 

Perfection Hartwell. 

This variety is in size between 
the LargeWhite Solid and Dwarf 
kinds; it is of excellent quality, 
very thick, and when blanched 
the heart is of a beautiful golden 
yellow color; preferable to the 
White Solid, and one of the 
best kinds ever introduced. 

^ Giant Pascal. This is a 

~~ selection from the New Golden 

Self-Blanching Celery; it par- 
takes of the best qualities of that 
variety, but it is a much larger 
and'better keeper. It is of a fine nutty 
flavor; grows about two feet high; the 
stalks are very broad, thick and crisp, 
entirel}' stringless; the width and thick- 
ness of the stalks are distinctive features 




Giant Pascal Celery. 



Celeriac or Turnip -Rooted Celery. 



Only such Seeds ivhich are suitable for om* Climate , should he 

soivn by our Gardeners, Half of the varieties sent out 

by JVorthern houses ^ no matter how good, 

are Valueless with us. 



40 



THB SEBD ANNUAL OF THE 



large as 
other 



either raw or after boiling the roots, which, 
when fully grown, are almost as 
Beets, and have the same flavor as 
Celery. If sown in the fall of the year and 
transplanted when large enough in beds 
about S inches apart, it will make fine roots 
but requires rich .soil. 



of this kind. It bleaches with but little 
'■earthing up" and ver}' quickly, usually in 
five or six days. 
Celeriac or Turnip Rooted Celery, 

is not planted to any extent in the South as 
there is not much demand for it; although 
it makes a splendid dish if served as a salad 

CHBRVII/. 

CERFErilv (Fr.), KERBELKRAUT (Ger.]. CERFOGIvIO (Ita). 
An aromatic plant, used a good deal for seasoning, especiall}- in 03'ster soup, and is 
often cut between Lettuce when served as a salad. In the North this vegetable is very 
little known, but in this section there is hardly a garden where it is not found. Sow broad- 
cast during fall for winter and spring, and in January and February for summer use. 

COLI/ARDS. 

A kind of cabbage which does not head, but the leaves are used the same as other 
cabbage. Not so popular as in former years, and very little planted in this vicinity. 

CORN SALAD. 

Mache. Doucet (Fr.). Acker Salat (Ger.). Valeriana (Sp. ). Vai.erianei.i.o (Ita.) 
Broad-leaved Corn Salad is the variety general i}- cultivated. It is used as a salad dur- 
ing the winter and early spring months. Should be sown broad-cast or in drills nine 
inches apart during fall and winter. 

CORN. 

Indian or Maize. 

Mais (Fr.), Wei^chkorn (Ger.), Maiz (Sp.), Maiz. Graxturco (Ita.) 

Plant in hills about three feet apart, drop four or five seeds and thin out to two or 

three. Where the ground is strong the Adam's Extra Eirly and Crosby's Sugar can be 

planted in hills two and a half feet apart, as these two varieties are more dwarfish than 

the other kinds. Plant for a succession from February to June. 



Extra Early Dwarf Sugar. 
Adains Extra Early. 
Early Sugar or Szi'eet. 
Stozi' ell's Evergreen Sugar. 
G oldest Dent Gourd Seed. 
Early Yellow Canada. 
Large White Flint. 

Bxtra Early or Crosby's Dwarf 

Sugar. This is a very tender variety and 
of excellent quality. Ears small, but very 
ender. It is not so extensively planted as 
it deserves to be. 

Early Sugar or New England. A 

long eight-rowed variety, which succeeds 
the Extra Early sorts. Desirable kind. 

StowePs Evergreen Sug;ar. This is 

the best of all Sugar Corn. It is early, the 
ears are of large size, and are well filled. It 
remainsgreen longer than any other variety, 
and is quite productive. The cultivation of 
this excellent cereal, as well as all other 
Sugar Corn, is much neglected, yet why 
people will plant common field-corn for table 
use, considering size instead of quality, we 
cannot understand. 

Adam's Extra Early. The earliest 
kind, but ears are small, and it is not as de- 
sirable as the Adam's Early, which follows 
this variety closely in maturit}-. 

Adam's Early. This is almost exclusi- 
vely planted for the first roasting ears by 
the market gardeners. The ears are of good 
size, but otherwise for the table only, same 
as common corn. Strange to say. the 
gardeners do not plant any sugar corn for 
the market. We sell hundreds of bushels of 
St. Charles and other varieties of field corn; 



BhmVs Prolific Field. 
Improved Learning. 
Golden Beauty. 
Chainpio?i White Pearl. 
iMosby's Prolific. 
Hickory King. 
White Rockdale Corn. 




Evergreen Earlv Sugar, or Extra Early, 

Sugar Corn. New England Com. Sugar Corn, 



Strict Attention to the Wants of our Patrons is our Motto. 



RICHARD FROTSCHBR SB:ED CO., I,td. 



41 




Champion White Pearl Corn, 



to be planted for the market, to be sold 
green. 

Champion White Pearl. This is a 
very handsome white corn. The grain is 
pure white, exceedingly heavy and long, 
two of which will span the cob. which is 
small. Being medium in size of stalk it cau 
be planted much thicker than a large corn, 
and at the same time bear a full sized ear. 
The originator has established in Champion 
White Pearl Corn a short, thick stalk, with 
the ear growing low upon it, which is an ad- 
vantage in stormy weather. Planted here a 
good deal for the market. 

Improved I/eaming:. An extra early 
field variety. It is not hard and flinty, but 
sweet and nutritious, makitg excellent feed 
and fine meal. The ears are large and 
handsome, with deep large grains, deep 
orange color and small red cob. It is very 
productive. The shucks cover the ear better 
than any Northen or Western variet}^ here 




Improved Learning. 



Considering the Qualify of our Seeds, our I^rices are 7nueh 
lower than those of any other ReliaUe Seed house 

in the South, 



42 



THK se:^d annitai/ of the 



ever tried. It is adapted to a variety of I Golden Beauty. This is the hand- 
soils and produces well on heavy or light ---^of all yellow corn ; the ears are of a 
soil; it hasshownitselfas very reliable. | perfect shape, long, and filled out to the 




^';s?s,wiJ^'^A^'y^ 



Golden Beauty Corn. 



Hickory King Corn. 



nating Qualities and Adaptabilitij to Our 
Climate and Soil. 



RICHARD FROTSCHBR SBBD CO., I,td. 



4S 



end of the cob. The grains are not of a 
flinty type, neither are they so soft as to be 
greatly shrivelled, as in the Golden Dent. 
Golden Beauty matures early, ripening in 
eighty days from planting, and surpasses all 
in size and beauty of grain. 

Mosby's Prolific Corn. This is a 
Southern Corn, and is recommended for 
general crop. The originator of this variety 
says/ "This corn is a cross between two 
widely different varieties. It is purely white; 
small cob, deep, full grain, neither too hard 
nor too soft, and stand crowding in the drill 
as close again as any other kind. Ears of 
medium size, but long. It stands the drouth 
better than ordinary corn.'' Should be 
planted early. 

Hickory King^. A Field Corn of re- 
cent introduction. It has proven itself all 
that is claimed for it, and is the Largest 
Grained and Smallest Cobbed Pure White 
Dent Corn in the World. It is very early. 
The ears are from seven to nine inches in 
length, and are generally borne from three 
to five on a stalk, making it very productive. 
The ears are well covered by the shucks; a 
great consideration in Field Corn planted in 
the South. 

Golden Dent Gourd Seed. A field 
variety which is very productive at the 
North. It makes a very fine Corn South, 



but has to be planted here several years in 
succession before it attains perfection, as 
during the first year the ears are not well 
covered by the husk, which is the case with 
all Northern varieties. When selected and 
planted here for a few years, it becomes ac- 
climated and makes an excellent Corn, with 
large, fine ears, grain deep and cob of me- 
dium size. 

Karly Yellow Canada. A long eight- 
rowed variety, very early, and is planted in 
both the field and garden. It does well 
here. 

I/arge White Flint. A very popular 
variety with gardeners and amateurs. It is 
planted here for table use principally, but 
like the Golden Dent, makes an excellent 
kind for field culture after it has been planted 
here for two or three years. 

Blunt's Prolific Field Corn. This is 
a very excellent variety, either for the field 
or for the table. It is very prolific, , pro- 
ducing from four to six ears of corn. They 
are of medium size, but well filled and 
heavy. It is second early. This variety 
has done better than any other, and, being 
of Southern origin, it seems to be better 
adapted to our climate. We recommend it 
as an earl 5' yielding Corn for field culture. 

Yellow Creole Corn. This is the 
flintiest variety of all Corns in cultivation 




White Rockdale Corn. 



It will pay JEveyy Farmer to plant Corn for Stock Food, Es- 
pecially the Hard and Flinty varieties, they 
are almost weavil proof. 



44 



THE SnWy ANNUAI, OF THE^ 



and can be easily called weevil proof. It 
will withstand more drouth than any other 
sort; the ears are well covered by the shuck, 
which prevents birds from picking, and 
rain from spoiling it. It is be kind gen- 
erally planted here for ma n crop. The 
strain we offer is the true kind and very 
choice. 

White Rockdale Corn. This new 



southern variety has been planted quite 
extensively and has proven to be everything 
that was claimed for it. .11 is the best South- 
ern White Corn in cultivation , flintier than 
the Mosby's Prolific, moderately early; cob 
small, deeply dented grain of pure white 
color and makes excellent meal. We recom- 
mend same highly; anyone using this corn 
will not be disappointed. 



CRl^SS. 

CrK-SSON (Fr.), Kress:^ (Ger.), Mastuerzo (Span.), Crescione (ItaL) 

Used for salad during winter and spring. Sow broad-cast or in drills six inches apart. 

Curled or Pepper Grass. Not much used in this section. 

Broad-I/eaved. This variety is extensively cultivated for the market. It is sown from 
early fall to late spring. The leaves resemble Water Cress, a variety which does not well 
succeed here. Is considered a very wholesome dish. 

CUCUMBER. 

CONCOMBRE [Fr.], GuRKE [Ger.], Pepino [Sp.], CucumERO [Ital.] 
Cucumbers require a rich and well cultivated soil in order to do well. They should be 
planted in hills from three to four feet apart, according to the conditions of the soil and 
time of planting. If planted early they require more space as the vines have more time 
to expand before the hot summer weather sets in. 

♦ Before planting the land must be well prepared and enriched with rotted stable man ure 
or if not obtainable cotton peed meal. The seeds are planted from eight to ten to a hill 
and covered about half an inch deep; when the young plants have the first rough leaves 
they are thinned out to a proper stand which is about three to four to a hill. 

Our gardeners often plant Cucumbers in the open ground as early as the month of 
February and protect them during cold weather with small glass covered boxes. Or 
Cucumbers are sometimes started in hot beds in bottomless strawberry boxes or as they are 
styled here "Dirt Bands," and planted out of doors as soon as they have the first rough 
leaves. 

During dry weather in the spring, and especially while the plants begin to bear they 
must be frequently watered to keep them in a bearing condition. 

Itnproved Early White Spine. 

New Orleans Market, 

Early Erafne. 

Long Green Turkey. 

Early Cluster. 

West India Gherkin, 

Improved Early White Spine. This 
is a popular variety. It is of medium size, 
light green, covered with white spines, -and 
turns white when ripe. A good kind for 
shipping. It is used b}' market gardeners 
for forcing as well as outdoor culture and 
is very productive. 

I^ong Green Turkey, A long variety 
attaining a length of from fifteen to eighteen 
inches when well grown. Very fine and 
productive. 

New Orleans Market. This is a vari- 
ety selected from an imported forcing 
cucumber, introduced by the late Richard 
Frotscher. It is good for forcing or open 
ground; very productive^ keeps its green 
color and has few vines. This kind can not 
be excelled for shipping, as it produces very 
perfect cucumbers and but few culls; the 

Improved Early White Spine. 

The True New Orleans Market Cueumber opig'mated with the late 

Richard Frotscher, and we, his successors, continue 

to sell the original strain. 




RICHARD FROTSCH^R SEED CO., I/td, 



45 



largest growers of cucumbers for shipping 
about here plant none but this variet}^. It 
is quite different from the Long White 
Spine offered b}' some. 

Early Frame. A good, early \'ariet3% 
but not so popular as the foregoing kind. 
It is deep green in color, but turns yellow 
ver}^ quickly; therefore gardeners do not 
plant it much. 

Early Cluster. Early, short and prick- 
ly; it bears in clusters. 

West India Gherkin. This is an oval 
variety, small in size. When grown to its 
full size it can be stewed with meat. In 
fact, this is the only use made of it about 
New Orleans. 





Early Cluster. 



New Orleans Market. 





West India Gherkin. 
Early Frame. EGG PI/ANT. 

Aubergine [Fr.], Eierpfi^anze [Ger.], Berengena [Sp.], Mei^anzana [Ital.] 
The seed should be sown in hot beds in the early part of January. When a couple of 
inches high they should be transplanted into another frame, so that the plants may become 
strong and robust. When warm enough, generally during March, the plants can be planted 
in the open ground, about two and a half feet apart. This vegetable is very profitable in 
the South, and extensively cultivated. 



Our New Orleans Market Eg'g'plant Seed is grown from the Finest Se- 
lected Fruit and cannot be excelled. 



46 



THB Sn^D ANNUAI, OF THB 




New York Market. 




Early Dwarf Oval. 




New Orleans Market. 



The growing" of Eggplant Seed is under our own personal supervision. 



RICHARD FROTSCHER SEED CO., I^td. 47 



Early Dwarf Oval. This variety is 
very early and productive; the Iruit is not 
so large as the New Orleans Egg Plant, but 
equal in flavor. For market it will not sell 
as well as the former; desirable for family 
garden. 

The New York Market. Is rounder 

in shape than the New Orleans; has spines 
on leaves and stems; not every popular 
here. Shippers and gardeners always give 
the New Orleans Market variety the pre- 
ference. 

IfSLTge Purple, or New Orleans 



Market- This is the only kind grown 
here for our market as well as shipping, it 
is large, oval in shape and of a dark purple 
color and very productive. Southern grown 
seed of this, as a good many tropical or sub- 
tropical vegetables, is preferable to North- 
ern seed, as it will germinate more readily, 
and the plant will last longer during the 
hot season. It is the best variety for ship- 
ping, superior to the Northern raised kinds. 
It carries better. The cut is made from 
three ordinary specimens and represents the 
true form. 



ENDIVE. 

Ghicoree [Fr.], Endivien [Ger.], Endibia [Sp.], Endivia [Ital.] 

A salad plant which is very popular and much cultivated for the market, principally 
for summer use. It can be sown in drills a foot apart, and when the plants are well up, 
thinned out till about eight inches apart. Or it can be sown broadcast thinly and trans- 
planted the same as Lettuce. When the leaves are large enough, say about eight inches 
long, tie them up for blanching, to make them fit for table. This can only be done in 
dry weather, otherwise the leaves are apt to rot. For summer use do not sow before the 
end of March, as if sown sooner, the plants will run into seed very early. Sow for a suc- 
cession during the spring and summer months. For winter use sow in September and 
October. 




Green Curled Endive. 



Green Curled. Is the most desirable 
kind, as it stands more heat than the fol- 
lowing sort, and is the favorite market va- 
riety. 

Extra Fine Curled. Does not grow 
quite so large as the foregoing, and is more 
apt to decay when there is a wet summer. 
Better adapted for winter. 

Broad-I/eaved, or EscaroUe. Makes 
a fine salad when well grown and blanched, 
especially for summer. 



GARI^IC. 



L'Aii. [Fr.], Knoblauch [Ger 

Garlic. There is more Garlic grown in 
Louisiana than in any other State, or in all 
States together. It is a staple product of 
the lower parishes, and is raised for home 
consumption and shipping. It is used for 
flavoring stews, roasts and various other 
dishes. People from the South of Europe 
use much more than the inhabitants of the 
United States. It should be planted in Oc- 
tober and Novem1)er. in drills two to three 
feet apart, about six inches in the drills and 



.], Ajo, [Sp.], AGr.10 [Ital.] 

one inch deep. The distance between the 
rows depend upon the mode of cultivation; 
if planted in the garden, a foot between the 
rows is sufficient It is cultivated like On - 
ions; in the spring they are taken up and 
platted together in a string b}' the tops, 
One of these strings contains from 50 to 
60 heads in double rows; they are then 
stored or rather hung up in a dry, airy place, 
and will keep from 6 to 8 months. 



It is our determination to sell only such Seeds as have increased our 
business to its present large proportions. 



48 



THE SEED ANNUAly OF THE 



KOHlvRABI OR TURNIP ROOTED CABBAGE. 

Ghou Navet [Fr.]. Kohlrabi [Ger.] . Col de Nabo [Sp.], Cavolo Trunze [Ital.] 

This vegetable is 'Very popular with the 
European populationof our city, and largely 
cultivated here. It is used for soups, or pre- 
pared in the same manner as Cauliflower. 
For late fall and winter use it should be 
sown from the end of July till the middle of 
October; for spring use, during January and 
February. When the young plants are one 
month Old transplant them in rows one foot 
apart, and about the same distance in the 
rows. Theyalsogrowfinely if sown broadcast 
and thinned out when young, so that the 
plants are not too crowded; or, they ma}- be 
sown in drills, and cultivated the same as 
Ruta Bagas. 

Early White Vienua. The finest va- 
riet3-ofall, and the only kind we keep. It 
is early, forms a smooth bulb, and has few 
small leaves. The so-called large White or 
Greer is not desirable. 





Earlv White Vienna Kohl-Kabi. 



I/EEK. 

Poireau [Fr.], Lauch [Ger.], PuERO [Sp.]. Porro [Ital.] 

A species of Onion highly esteemed for flavoring soups. Should be 
sown broadcast and transplanted, when about six to eight inches high. 
into rows a foot apart, and six inches apart in the rows. Should be 
planted at least four inches deep. They require to be well cultivated in 
order to secure large roots. Sow in October for winter and spring use, 
and in January and Februar}', -for summer. 

I/argfe I/ondon Flag". Is the kind most generally grown. 

I/arge Carentan. This is a French variety which grows to a very- 
large size; takes the place of the former. 

Large London Flag Leek. 

I^ETTUCE. 

Laitue [Fr.]. Lattich [Ger.]. Lechuga [Sp.]. Lattl'Ga [Ital.] 

Lettuce is with our market gardeners one of their principal and is grown here almost 
during the whole 3-ear. To grow it well in summer is connected with a good deal of labor, 
especially during dry weather, as it requires a great deal of moisture and necessitates an 
almost constant watering. In autumn and earh- spring, when the weather is cool. Lettuce 
seed if sown broadcast, germinates freely and if transplantel into rich soil will form fine, 
crisp and solid heads, and it is an established fact that this vegetable grows nowhere better 
than around New Orleans. In summer the seed has to be germinated before sowing otherwise 
the ants will carr}- it off. The soil for lettuce can hardly be too rich, as the size of the 
head depends entirely upon the condition of the soil. Lettuce should be planted out in rows 
a foot apart, and from eight to ten inches apart in rows. Some kinds grow larger than 
others; for instance, Butterhead will not require as much space as Drumhead or Perpignan. 



The New Orleans Improved Passion Leltuce is one of our Specialties. 



RICHARD FROTSCHBR SEKD CO., I,td. 



43 



Early Cabbage, or White Butter Head. 
Itnproved Royal Cabbage. 
Brown Dutch Cabbage. 



Drumhead Cabbage. 




Perpignan. A fine German variety, 
which foims lar^e, lijiht ^reen heads, and 
which stands the heat better than the 
Royal. It is mucit cultivated for the nf>ar- 
ket, as it thrives well when sown during the 
Jatter part of spring. 



White Paris Coss, 

Perpignan. 

Nezo Orleans Improved Large Passion. 

Trocadero. 

New Orleans Improved 
I/arge Passion. This is a Cab- 
bage Lettuce introduced from 
Califoinia; it attains a large size, 
glows slowly, but heads very hard. 
It does better here during late au- 
tumn and winter than in summer, 
as it cannot stand the heat. If 
sown late in the fall and trans- 
planted during winter, it grows to 
very large heads, hard and firm. 
This is the kind shipped from 
here in the spring, and cannot be 
surpassed for that purpose. 

Trocadero I/Cttuce A new 
Cabbage Lettuce from France; it 
is of light green color, forming a 
large solid head, resembling the 
New Orleans Improved Passion 
Lettuce somewhat in appearance; 
however, the leaves are thinner, and, 
therefore, not so well adapted for ship- 
ping. It is excellent for forcing for home 
market. 




Perpignan Lettuce. 





White Paris Coss Lettuce. 



Trocadero Lettuce. 



White Paris Coss- This is very popu- 
lar with the New Orleans market gardeners 
as it is the favorite with the French popula- 
tion. It grows to perfection and forms 
large, fine heads, particularly in the spring 
of the year. 

Drumhead Cabbage. An excellent 
spring variety, forming large heads, the 
outer leaves eurled. 

Barly Cabbage or White Butter. An 

•early variety, forming a solid head, but not 
quite so large as some others. It is the best 
kind for family use, to sow during fall and 
early spring, as it is very early and of good 
flavor. 

Improved Royal Cabbage, This is 
the most popular variet3' in this State. 
Heads light green, of large size* and about 



Strict Attention to the Wants of our Patrons is our Motto, 



50 



THE S:EED ANNUAI^OF THE 




Drumhead Cabbage Lettuce. 




two weeks later thau the White Butter. It 
is very tender and crisp; can be sown later 
in the spring than the foregoing kind, and 
does not run into seed so quickly. 

Brown Dutcli Cabbage. A very hard 
kind, forms a solid head; not so popialai as 
many other kinds; good for winter. 




Early Cabbage or White Butter Lettuce, Improved Royal Cabbage Lettuce, 

MBI/ON. 

Musk or Cayiteloupe. 

Caxteloupe (Fr.), ZucKERMELONE (Ger.), MeIvON (Sp.)? Mellox Dulce (Ila.) 

Melons require a rich sandy loam. If the ground is not rich, enough a couple of 
shovels full of rotted manure should be mixed into each hill, which ought to be from five 




X CJtiZtJ. 



Note.— The above cut represents the New Orleans Melon; it has been taken fi-om a common speci- 
men grown by one of our customers, who raises the seed of this variety for us. 



Nowhere in the United States are better Canteloupes grown than in 

New Orleans and vicinity. 



RICHARD FR0TSCH:ER SBBD CO., I<td. 



51 



to six feet apart; drop ten or twelve seeds, and when the plants have two or three tough 
leaves, thin out to three or four plants. Canteloupes are cultivated very extensively in 
the neighborhood of New Orleans; the quality is very fine and far superior to those raised 
in the North. Some gardeners plant during February and cover with boxes, the same as 
described for Cucumbers. When Melons are ripening, too much rain will impair the flavor 
of the fruit. 



Osage. 

Netted Nutmeg. 

Netted Citron. 

New Orleans Market. 



Pine Apple. 

Early White Japan. 

Persian or Cassaba. 



New Orleans Market. A large species 
of the citron kind. It is extensively grown 
for this market; large in size, ver} roughly 
netted and of luscious flavor; different alto- 
gether from the Northern Netted Citron, 
which is earlier but not so fine in flavor, and 
not half the size of the variety grown here. 

The New Orleans Market cannot be excel- 
led by any other variety in the world. In a 
favorable season it is a perfect gem. It has 
been tried alongside of varieties raised at 
the North, such as are brought out every 
year. — but none of them could compare with 
the New Orleans Market. Some years ago, 
when the Melon crop was a failure at New 
Orleans, seed of this variety had to be grown 
up North, but they lost their fine qualities, 
size and flavor. It requires aSouthernSun to 
bring the seed to perfection. Small varie- 
ties of melons will improve in size if culti- 
vated here for a number of years, but care 
musi betaken that no Cucumbers, Squashes, 
Gourds, or Pumpkin are cultivated in the 
vicinity otherwise they will mix with them 
and poor hybirds are the result. If the best 
and earliest specimens are selected for seed, 

in three or four years the fruit will be large 
and fine. 

Netted Nutmeg Melon. Small oval 
melon, roughly netted, early, and of fine 
flavor. 

Netted Citron Canteloupe. This 
variety is larger than the foregoing kind; it 
is more rounded in shape, of medium size 
and roughly netted. 

Pine Apple Canteloupe. A medium 
sized early variety, oval in shape, and of 
very fine flavor. 

Osage Musk Melon. This variety is 
cultivated largely for the Chicago market. 
It is small and does not look very attractive, 
but is of excellent flavor. Recommend it 
highly for family use. It will not sell well 
in this market. People here are accustom- 
ed to roughly netted melons, such as the 
New Orleans Market. The Osage is smooth 
and very slightly netted. 







:=-'i 



Osage Melon, 

New l^arly Hackensack. A newly 
introduced variety, resembling the well 
known Hackensack, but not quite so large. 
It is productive and of good flavor. The 
seed we offer are Southern grown. It is 
earlier than the New Orleans Market. Re- 
commend same highly. 

Kmerald Gem. A medium size Melon 
which originated in Michigan. It is almost 
round, of very good quality, the skin is 
green and smooth; flesh salmon, fine grained 
and thick. Good variety for family use. 

Persian or Cassaba. A large variety, 
of oval shape and delicate flavor. The rind 
of this kind is very thin, which is a disad- 
vantage in handling, and prevents it from 
being planted for the market. Veiy fine 
for family use. 

lyarly White Japan Canteloupe. An 

early kind, of creamish white color, very 
sweet and medium size. 



The Seed of the New Orleans Market Musk Melon which we offer has 

been g'rown in the vicinity of our city from the 

best selected stock. 



mn SEiBD ANNUA]; of this 



MBI^ON. 

WATER. 
Mfxon b'Eau, Fas^kouh [Fr.], Wassermei^one [Ger.], Sandia [Sp,], Mei.i.one 

d'Acqua [Ital.] 

Water Melon will grow and produce in places where Canteloupe will not do well. The 
soil for this plant must be light and sandy. Plant in bills about eight feet apart, eight to 
twelve seeds in a hill; when the plants are well up thin out to three. The plants should 
be hoed often, and the ground between the hills kept clean till the vines touch. 



Ice Creain. ( White Seeded. } A me- 
dium siz^ed variety of excellent quality. It 
is early and very productive. Being thin 
in the rind it is not so well adapted for the 
market as the other kinds; notwithstanding 
this it isgrown exclusively by some for that, 
on account of its earliness. It has come 
into general cultivation more and more 
every year, as it is very sweet, and sells 
readily in the market.. 



Rattle Snake, An old Southern vari- 
ety which has come into notice of late years. 
It is of large size, light green, with large 
dark stripes, and is identical with the 
Gypsy. Fine market variety. It stands 
transportation better than most other kinds; 
has been the standard market melon till the 
Kolb's Gem wa» introduced. However it 
always will remain a favorite with market 
gardeners. The seed weofifer of this variety 
is especially grown for us- 




Mammoth Iron Clad, 



Florida^S FavafitCa This Melon ori- 
ginated with W. M. Girardeau, of Monti- 
cello, Fla. It is an excellent variety;, pro- 
lific, earlier than the Kolb Gem, Rattle- 
snake or Pride of Georgia, and very fine 
for table; yet it is as good for shipping as 
the Kolb Gem, or Rattlesnake^ of medium 
size, colored with light and dark green 
stripes alternately, flesh deep red, delici- 
ously sweet, firm and crisp. One of the 
best Melons. 

Mammoth Iron Clad. Highly recom- 
mended North. It did not do as well as 



Southern raised seed. We have the seed 
now grown in Florida, and, no doubt, it will 
give better satisfaction. 

Pride of Georg-ia. A variety from 
Georgia, of excellent quality; attains a large 
size when well cultivated. Very good for 
family use.;:; 

Duke Jones. A Southern [Melon of 
great merit. It is of the same shape as the 
Kolb Gem, but of much finer flavor and of 
large size. Rmd dark green, red flesh, large 
and early. The seedfwe offer has been 
grown of best selected stock by a careful 



The Lone Star Melon a& offered by us is one of the Finest Market vari- 
eties for our climate. 



RICHARD FROTSCHKR SBED CO., I^td. 



53 



grower of Georgia. It is a good shipper. 
We recommend it highly. 

Kolb Gem. Only a few years since this 
variety has been introduced, but the ship- 



ping qualities are so good, that the bulk of 
Melons raised for the market are of that 
kind. Flesh crimson, very thin but tough 
rind; fine flavor and full of flesh, no hollow 




■ : <s .;. "•;:■«>■:■ 

Florida's Favorite. 



iu the middle. It is the heavest Melon for I Seminole. This excellent variety origin- 
its size. What we offer are Southern grown ated in Florida a few years ago and is very 
sseds. j early, oblong in shape, of two colors, some 




Pride of Georgia. 



No other but Southern g'rown Melon Seed offered by our Firm. 



54 



THE SEED ANNUAI, OF THE 



grey and others light green resembling the 
Ice Cream, but larger in size. It is fine, 
flavored and productive. 



L-oneStar Water Melon. This Melon 
was brought here from Texas by Mr Nat. 
Henderson, of Iberia Parish. La. In visit- 




Kolb Gem. 




^^ ^-^ >i::^=; 



Strict Attention to the Wants of ouf Patrons is our Motto. 



RICHARD FROTSCHBR SBED CO., I/td. 



Ou 



ing that section some years ago, Mr. 
Frotsclier was very favorable impressed with 
the Uniterm size of the abundant crop of 
melons. He secured a small quantity of 
the seed; but by an unfortunate accident 
lost nearly all of them, excepting a few 
seeds which he had given for trial to some 
of his customers who made Melon growing 
a specialty. It has proven to be the best 
Melon for this section, either for Market or 
family use. This Melon is above medium 



and very uniform in size; a prolific bearer, 
oblong in shape; the rind is of mottled green 
and black color, somewhat like the Rattle- 
snake, but darker. The flesh is of a deep 
red color, solid, crisp and very sweet; in 
flavor it cannot be excelled by any variety. 
It is excellent for market as well as for 
family use. When better known it will be- 
come one of the leading varieties for the 
South. Recommend same very highly. 







Lone Star. 



MUSTARD. 

MouTARDE (Fr.). Senf (Ger.), Mostaza (Sp.) Mostardino (Ita.) 

This is grown to quite an extent in the Southern States, and is sown broad-cast dur- 
ing fall, winter and spring. It may be used the same as Spinach, or boiled with meat as 
greens. The White or Yellow vSeeded is very little cultivated, and is used chiefly for me- 
dical purposes, or pickling. The large-leaved or Curled has black seed, a distinct kind 
from the Northern or European variety. This seed is raised in Louisiana. It makes very 
large leaves; cultivated more and more every year. 



White or yellow Seeded, 
Large Leaved Curled, 

I/arge-I^eaved Curled. The favorite 
kind here, sown largely for the market. 
Leaves are pale green, large and curled or 
scalloped on the edges. 

Chinese Very lUarge Cabbage 



Chinese very large Cabbage Leaved. 



I/eaved. A European variety, with light 
green very large leaves. It has not the 
same taste as the large-leaved or the large 
curled, but will stand longer before going 
to seed. 



Years of experience in the Southern trade g'ives us a superiority over 

our competitors. 



56 



THE SEED ANNUAL OF THE 



NASTURTIUM. 

Capucine (Fr.), Ixdianische Krksse (Ger.), Capuchina (Sp.), Fior Cappucino \,Ital.) 

Tall. I Dwarf. 

Planted here only for ornament, (For description see List of Climbing Plants.) 



OKRA. 

GOMBO cFr.). EssBARER Hybiscus (Ger.), Gombo (Sp.J. Gombo (^Ital.) 

This is a highly esteemed vegetable in the South, and no garden, whether small or 
large, is without it. It is used in making ■■Gumbo." a dish the Creoles of Louisiana know 
better how to prepare than any other nationality. Ii is also boiled in salt and water, and 
served with vinegar as a salad, and is considered a wholesome dish. Should not be planted 
before the ground is warm in spring, as the seeds are apt to rot. Sow in drills, which 
ought to be two to three feet apart, and when up, thin out, and leave one or two plants 
everj' twelve or fifteen inches. 

Green Tall Growing. \ Dwarf Greeti Prolific. \ White I'elvet. 

Tall Growinj:^. This is the variety most \ the time the long podded varieties come in; 

cultivated here. ' The pods are long/round ' as ^n this market no ribbed pods sell well 



towards the end, and keep tender longer 
than the square podded kind. 

Dwarf Green Prolific. An extra early 

variety, very prolific; the pods are close 
together, from which the name. If planted 
for market it will be only in demand up to 



White Velvet. A white variety; dwarf 
with round, smooth pods, free from ridges 
and seams, and not prickly to the touch; 
very prolific and early. We tried this vari- 
ety thoroughly. It has come up to what is 
claimed for it and cannot be too highly 
recommended to all who have not tried it. 





Tall Growing Okra. 



White Velvet Okra, 



Weave always ready to give Infovmation in vegardto TJant'' 
ing, Selection of Vavieties and Cultivating. 



RICHARD FROTSCHBR SEBD CO., I.td. 



57 



ONION. 

Ognon (Fr.), Zwiebei. (Ger.), CeboIvTvA (Sp.), CiPOr.ivA (Ital. ) 

The following cut represents'a well-grown Onion raised from Louisiana or Creole 
seed. The Onion is one of the most important vegetables planted in this section. Thou- 
sands of barrels are annually shipped from here to the West and North. If sown at the 
proper time, with ordinary cultivation, they will always produce a crop and meet with 
ready sale. The seed is not a sure crop every year and some years it sells very high; the 
past season we had a fair crop of good heavy seed. Up to a few years ago no other variety 
of Onion was known, which would form good bulbs like the Creole; all the Italian kinds 
'were tried before withv.»ut success, but having no Louisiana seed at all the True Red 
Bermuda seed, which is raised at Teneriffe and the coast of Africa, was imported and 
gave good satisfaction. It is a flat shaped Onion, a little lighter in color than the Creole, 
earlier, and does not shoot up like that kind; comes into the market just after the ship- 




Our Creole Onion Seed is grotvn from the most JPerfect Bulbs 
selected tinder our personal supervision. 



58 



THE Snrn^ ANNUAI^ OF THE 



ping from the West is exhausted and hits the market at the proper time. We would 
recommend the Bermuda for home use and home market, but for shipping, to distant 
markets, it is unfit, as it decays quickh% and when dry peels off. The Creole has the pre- 
ference, even shot up onions sell for a better price than the Bermuda. None of the North- 
ern grown seed sown here ivill produce any Onion. 



Red Bermuda. 
White Bermuda. 

The X/Ouisiana or Creole Onion has 

been cultivated here for a century — sup- 
posed to have been brought first from the 
south of Europe; we presume the bulbs 
produced but few seeds. : It is hard to say, 
from what variety this Onion originated; 
having been planted here for so long it has 
become a distinct kind. It is not as red 
as the Wethersfield. and not as light as the 
Strassburg; in flavor it is similar to the 
two last named varieties, but much stronger 
than the Ltalian kinds. In this latitude the 
seed should be sown from the 15th of Sep- 
tember to about the loth of October; if 
sown sooner, a good many will throw up 
seed stalks, which impairs the keeping 
quality of the Onion. We sow the seed 
broadcast, protect the seed beds by spread- 
ing green moss over them, which is remov- 
ed every evening and replaced in the morn- 
ing. Some gardeners use Latania leaves 
for covering the beds. When the seed is 
coming up, say in 7 or 9 days, the cover has 
to be removed entirely; but if the weather 
is dry, the watering has to be continued. 
They thrive best in loamy soil. Can be 
planted in the same ground for yeais; and 
require no rotation as other crops. 

When the plants have reached the size of 
a goose quill, they are transplanted into rows 
which can be from one to two feet apart, ac- 
cording to the mode of cultivation, and about 
five or six inches apart in the rows. The 
ground should be thoroughly prepared be- 
fore setting out the plants. We generally 
shorten the the tops and roots. In April the 
Onion will be ready to be taken up. 



Louisiana or Creole. 
White Queen. 

In sections where it is too cold to sow Onion 

seed in the fall, the Creole seed can be sown 

in January and February; in that case they 

should be sown very thinly in drills, thinned 
out to a proper stand, and by the end of 
spring they will produce a good sized Onion. 
Growers here use very little, if any fertili- 
zers, but it can be used with advantage. One 
of our principal Onion growers used 500 
pounds of phosphated bone on some of his 
crop, and the result was ver}- satisfactory. 
He sold from three acres, 250 barrels of 
Onions, flour barrels, well packed for ship- 
ping, not produce barrels as sent here from 
the West. He also had a lot of small ones 
left for home use. For spring sowing we 
would recommend the Bermuda seed. 

The seed of the Creole Onicn, which we 
offer, is grown for us by an old experienced 
Onion grower at Lafourche; he has raised 
seed for Mr. Frotscher for nearly 20 years. 
No better stock can be found. We do not 
depend upon chance purchases; very often 
seed raised from shot up Onions are sold 
very low. but will not produce good mer- 
chantable Onions, having a tendency to go 
to seed again before the bulb is matured. 
Most gardeners here know all about the 
cultivation of the Creole Onion; these re- 
marks, therefore, are made for those who 
live in adjoining States where the Creole 
Onion can be successfully cultivated — more 
so in Texas, Mississippi and Florida. The 
demand for Creole Onion seed from these 
sections increases every year, especially 
from Texas. 




Good Crops are the result of perfect Seed and good CuIUvation, 



RICHARD FROTSCHER SBBD CO., I/td. 



5ft 



White Bermuda Onion. This variety 
is of the same shape, size and flavor as the 
Red Bermuda; the only difference is in the 
color, which is pure white. Very good for 
family use. 

ITALIAN ONIONS. 

White Queen. This is a medium sized, 



white variety from Italy, very early and flat; 
can be sown as late as February, and good 
sized bulbs will yet be obtained. It is of mild 
flavor and very fine when Ijoiled and dress- 
ed for the table. It cannot be too highly 
recommended. 



SHAI/I^OTS. . 

ESHALI^OTTE (Fr.), SCHAT^LOTTJECN (Ger.), ESCA[.0N[A (Sp.), SCAT.OGNO (Ital.). 

A small sized Onion which grows in clumps. It is generally grown in the South, and 
nsedin its green state for soups, stew, etc. There are two varieties, the Red and White; 
the latter variety is the most "popular. In the fall of the year the bulbs are divided and 
set out in rows a foot apart, and four to six inches in the rows. They grow and multiply 
very fast, and can be divided during winter, and set out again. Lite in the spring, when 
the tops become dry, they have to be taken up, thoroughly dried, and stored in a dry, 
airy place. 

PARSLKY: 

PKRSII, (Fr. ), PkTERSIWE (Ger.j, Pkrzii, (Sp.), Petrosei^ino (Ital.). 

Parsley can be sown during the fall from August to October, and during spring, from 
the end of January to the end of April, It is genei"ally sown broadcast. 



Plain Leaved. 
Double Curled. 

Plain I/eaved. This is the kind raised 
for the New Orleans market. 

Double Curled. The leaves of this 
variety are curled. It has the same flavor 
as the other kind, but is not so popular. Has 



Improved Garnishing. 

been largely grown of late for shipping. 

Improved Garnishing. This is the 
best kind to ornament a dish; it has the 
same flavor as the other kinds. 



PARSNIP. 

Panais [Fr.]. PASTiNAKE[Ger.l, Pastinaca [Sp.], PasTinaca [Ital.]. 

Should be sown in deep, mellow soil, deeply spaded, as the roots are long, in drills 
twelve to eighteen inches apart, when the plants are three inches high, thin out to three 
inches apart in the rows. Sow from September to November for winter, and January to 
March for spring and summer crops. 

The Hallow Crown, or Sugar, is the kind generally cultivated; it possesses all 
the good qualities for which other varieties are recommended. 



PEAS. 

Pois [Fr.], Erbse [Ger. J, GuisanTE, Pesoi.es [vSp.], PiSEi.t,o [Ital.]. 

Peas are a fine vegetable, and therefore are very generally cultivated. It is best to 
plant in ground manured the previous year, else the}- will make more vines than peas. As 
a general thing the dwarf kinds require richer ground than the tall growing varieties. 
Marrowfat Peas, planted in rich ground will not bear well, but they produce finely in 
sandy light soil. 

The Extra Early Tom Thumb and Laxton's Alpha will not produce a large crop without 
being in rich ground. Peas have to be planted in drills two inches deep and from two to 
three feet apart, according to the height they may grow. Tom Thumb can be planted 
one foot apart, whereas the White Marrowfat or Champion of England require three feet. 
The Extra Early. Alpha and Tom Thumb can be planted during August and September 
for fall. During November and December we plant the Marrowfat; January and February 
or as late as March, all kinds can be planted; but for the latter month only the earliest 
varieties should be used, as the late varieties will get mildewed before they bring a crop. 
Peas will bear much better if some brush or rods are stuck in the drills to support them, 
and even the very dwarf kinds will bear better when stacked. 

Try our Blue Beauty Peas for the Market, they give entire sat- 
isfaction. 



60 



TH:e SBED ANNUAI, OF THB 



EARI^IEST. 



Cleveland' s Alaska^ 2% feet. 

Extra Early, or first and Best, 2% feet. 

Early Washington, 3 feet. 

Early Tom Thmnb. i foot. 

Laxton^s Alpha, j feet. 

American Wonder, lYifeet. 

Blue Beauty, 2 feet. 

SECOND CROP. 
Bishop's Dwarf Long Pod, iy2,feet. 
Champion of England, sf^^^' 
McLean s Advances , j feet. 
Carter' s Strategem. 2)0 f^^t. 

Karly Alaska. This is an extra early 
Pea, blue in color, the earliest by a few days 
of any other kind; very pure and prolific, 
the best flavored pea among the Extra 
Early smooth podded kinds. Recommend 
it highly. 

Bxtra Barly or First and Best. This 
was the earliest Pea cultivated, until the 
introduction of the Alaska; verv popular 
with the small market gardeners here, who 
have rich grounds. It is very productive 
and well flavored. The stock we sell is as 



McLean's Little Gem. lyifeet. 
Laxton's Prolific Long Pod, 3 feet. 
Eugenie, 3 feet. 
Carter's Telephotie, 5 feet. 

GENERAL CROP. 
Dwarf Blue Imperial, 3 feet. 
Royal Dwarf Marrow. 3 feet. 
Black Eyed Marrowfat, </ feet. 
Large White Marrowfat, 4 feet. 
Dwarf Sugar, 2y2. feet. 
Tall SiLgar., 6 feet: 

good as any other in the country, not sur- 
passed by any, no matter whose name is put 
before "Extra Earl}'." 

Karly Washington, Barly May or 
Frame, which are nearly all the same 
thing, is about ten days later than the 
Extra Early. It is very productive, and 
keeps longer in bearing than the foregoing 
kind. Pods a little smaller. Very popular 
about New Orleans. 

Tom Thumb. Very dwarfish and quite 
productive, Can be cultviated in rows a 




Early Alaska. 



Out stoch of Peas is JPtire and all Varieties true to Wame, 



RICHARD FROTSCHBR SEED CO., I^td. 



61 



foot apart; requires no branches or sticks. 

I/axtoti's Alpha. This is the earliest 
wrinkled pea in cultivation; of delicious 
flavor and very prolific. This variety de- 
serves to be recommended to all who like a 
first-class pea. It will come into 
cultivation when better known. 



general 



American Wonder. A wrinkled pea 
of dwarf growth; lo to 12 inches; is prolific, 
early, of fine quality, and comes in after the 
Extra Early. 

Bishop's Dwarf I/Ong Pod. An early 
dwarf variety ; very stout and branching, re- 
quires no sticks but simply the earth drawn 
around the roots. It is productive and of 
excellent quality. 

Blue Beauty. This early variety is 
really one of the best, ever introduced^ here. 
Since it was first brought to the notice of 
our Truck farmers here a little over two 
years ago, the demand for it has been 
steadily increasing, and there is no doubt but 
that the Blue Beauty will become our prin- 
cipal market and shipping variety. We 
may class it among our earliest ones as it 
comes in bearing with the Washington, but 
does not grow quite as tall. The Peas are 
of a fine blueish green color, resembling the 
Alaska very much except in size, they are 
larger. 

This variety cannot be too highly recom- 
mended. 

Champion of England. A green 
wrinkled variety of very fine flavor; not 
profitable for the market, but recommend- 
ed for fami.lyuse. 

Mcl/ean's Advancer. This is another 
green, wrinkleo variety, about two weeks 
earlier than the foregoing kind. 

Mcl/can's I/ittle Gem. A dwarf 

wrinkled variety. It is early, very prolific 
and of excellent flavor. Requires no sticks. 

I/axton's Prolific l/ong Pod. A green 
marrow pea of good quality. Pods are long 
and well filled. It is second early, and can 
be recommended for the use of market 
gardeners, being very prolific. 

Eugenie. A white wrinkled variet}-, of 
fine flavor: it is of the same season as the 
Advancer, Cannot be too highly recom- 
mended for family use. 

Carter's Stratagem. A wrinkled varie- 
ty from England. It is very distinct in vine 




Extra Early, or First and Best. 

and foliage; growing thick and large, does 
not need any support. It is the I^argest 
Podded variety ever brought out, pods 
4-5)^ inches long, which cannot be surpas- 
sed in flavor, and is very productive. Re- 
commended it highly. 

Carter's Telephone. Another wrink- 
led English late variety; grows about from 
4K to 5 feet high. The pods are very long, 
containing from 8-12 fine flavored peas. It 
is productive; will bear twice as much as 
the Champion of England, which is about of 
the same season. 

Dwarf Blue Imperial. A very good 
bearer if planted early, pods are large and 
and well filled. 

Royal Dwarf Marrow. Similar to the 
large Marrowfat, but of dwarf habit. 



On hard cind worn out soil sow Coiv Pects for Fertilizing pur- 
poses, no other Fertilizer is as clieap, has the same 
effect and will get your land as mellow. 



62 



THE SEED ANNUAL OF THE 



Black-eyed Marrowfat- This kind is 
planied more for the market than any 
other. It is very productive, and when 
young, quite tender. Grows about four 
feet high. 

I/arge White Marrowfat. Similar to 
the last variety, excep: that it grows about 
two feet taller and is less productive. 




Carter's Telephoae, 



Dwarf Sugar. A variety of which the 
whole pod can be used after the string is 
drawn off from the back. Three feet high. 

Tall Stigar. Has the same qualities as 
the foregoing kind, only grows taller, and 
the pods are somewhat larger. Neither of 
these two varieties are very popular here. 




Carters Stratagem 



THE PEA BUG. 



All peas grown near Philadelphia have small holes in them, caused b}' the sting of the 
Pea Bug. while the pod is forming, vhen it deposits its egg in it. Later the insect perfects 
itself and comes out of the dry pea. leaving the hole. 

The germ of the pea is never destroyed, and they grew equally as well as those with- 
out holes. Market gardeners in this neighborhood who have been planting the Extra 
Early Peas for years, will not take them without holes, and consider these a trade mark. 

FIELD or COW PEAS. 

There are a great many varieties of Cow Peas, different in color and growth. They are 
planted mostly for fertilizing purposes and are sown broad-cast; when in a good stand, and 

All Xovelties are properly tried on our Trial Grounds be/ore 

we offer ihetn to our Batrons. 



RICHARD FROTSCHBR Sl^m^ CO., I,td. 



63 



of sufficient height, they are plowed under. The Clay Pea is the most popular. There 
are several varieties called crowders, which do not grow as tall as the others, but produce 
a great many pods, which are used green; the same as snap-beans, and if dried, like dried, 
beans, make a very good dish. The crowders are of an oblong shape, almost pointed at 
one end; they are on an average larger than the other Field Peas. I^ady Peas are small, 
white, with a back eye; they are generally planted between corn, so that they can run up 
on it. Dry, they are considered the very best variety for cooking. 

p:^pp^r. 

PiMENT (Fr.), Spanischkr Pfkffer (Ger.), Pimento (Sp.), Peperone (Ita.) 

Peppers are tender and require to be raised in the hot bed. Seed should be sown in 
January, and when large enough transplanted into the ground in rows from one and a half 
to two feet apart, and a foot to a foot and a half in the rows. There are more Peppers 
raised here than in other sections of the country; the hot varieties are used for seasoning 
and making pepper sauce; the mild variety is highly esteemed for salad. Care should be 
taken not to grow different kinds close together, as they mix very readily. 



Bel/ or Bull Nose. 

Sweet Spanish Mammoth. 

Columbus. 

Sweet Ruby Kins;. 

Golden Dawn Mango. 

Long Red Cayenne. 

Sweet Spanish Mammoth. A very 
popular variety, much cultivated. It is 
very mild, grows to a large size, tapering 
towards the end. and, when green, is used 
as a salad. Superior for that purpose to any 
other kind. 

Sweet Pepper, Ruby King. This 
variety grows to a larger size than the Sweet 
Spanish Mammoth, and is of different 



Red Cherry. 
Bird Eye, 
Chili. 
Tabasco. 
Red Cluster. 



shape. The fruit is from 5 to 6 inches long 
by about 3 to 4 inches in diameter, and of 
bright red color. It is remarkably mild 
and pleasant in flavor, and can be sliced 
and eaten as a salad the same as the Span- 
ish Mammoth, Single plants ripen from 8 
to 10 fruits, making this variety both pro- 
ductive and profitable. A decided acquisi- 
tion. 





Sweet Spanish, Mammoth Pepper. 



Sweet Pepper Ruby King. 



All Seeds are of Undoubted Germinating" Qualities and only such vari- 
eties are sold as suit our Climate and Soil. 



64 



THE SB]^D ANNUAL OF THE! 




Columbus Sweet Pepper. 

ff 

XfOtig Red Cayenne. Is very hot and 
pungent. Cultivated here and used for 
pepper sauce and seasoning purposes. There 
are two varieties, one is long and straight, 
and the other like shown in cut, which is 
the only kind we sell. 



Columbus Sweet Pep- 
per. This fine sweet pepper 
was introduced by Mr. Frot- 
scher some few years ago and 
has done all that was claimed 
for it. Without doubt it is 
the finest and largest Sweet 
pepper in existence. It is 
more of the shape of the Ruby 
King than the Sweet Spanish, 
but much thicker in flesh and 
larger. It has become quite a 
favorite with the Market Gar- 
deners on account of its beau- 
tiful shape and fine eating 
qualities. It is also very pro- 
ductive; recommend it highh' 
for family use. Give it a trial. 
Golden Dawn Mango. 
This sweet pepper attracted 
much attention for the last 
few years, and was admired 
by all who saw it. We be- 
lieve it to be all the origina- 
tor claims for it. In shape 
and size it resembles the Bell. 
Color, a bright waxy goJdefi 
yellow, ver}' brilliant and 
handsome. Single plants ri- 
pen from twelve to tv^^enty-four fruits, mak- 
ing them productive and profitable. They 
are entirely exempt from any fier\- taste or 
flavor, and can be eaten as readily as an 
apple. 

Bell or Bull Nose. Is a large oblong 
variety which is not sweet or mild, as 




T.abasco Pepper. 



The growing' of Egg-plant Seed is under our own personal supervision. 



RICHARD FROTSCH]^R SE^^D CO., I/td. 



65 



thought 



by some people. The seeds are 
very hot Used for pickling. 

Red CltlSter. A new variety of which 
the pods grow in bunches, upright like the 
Chili which the pods resemble, but are a 
little larger. Quite distinct, and ornamental 
on account of the bright fruit and compact 
growth of the plant. It is hot and pungent. 

Tabasco Pepper. This variety of pep- 
per is growMi for the market as well as for 
making sauce. It is pungent and strong, 
also very prolific. It is easily gathered as 
the fruit does not adhere to the stem, and 



grows almost erect on the branches, as may 
be seen in the cut. This variety is used in 
manufacturing the well-known Tabasco 
Sauce. It is splendid for family use. 

Red Cherry. A small, roundish variety, 
very hot and produclive- 

Bird Kye. Small, as the name indicates. 
It is very hot and used principally for pep- 
per vinegar. 

Chili. A small variety, from three- 
fourths to an inch long. It is strong and 
used for pepper sauce; very prolific. 





Long Red Cayenne Pepper, 



Eed Cluster Pepper. 



POTATOES. 

PoMME DE Terre [Fr ], Kartoefei, [Ger.j, PaTaTAS INGIvEZAS [Sp.] Tartueo 

BlANCHO [Ital.] 

. Potatoes thrive and produce best in light, dry but rich soil. Well decomposed stable 
manure is the best, but if not to be had, cotton seed meal, bone dust, of any other fertilizer 
should be used to make the ground rich enoftgh. If the ground was planted the fall 
previous with Cow Peas, which were plowed under, it will be in good condition for pota- 
toes. Good sized tubers should be selected for planting, which can be cut in pieces not too 
small, each piece ought to contain at least three eyes. Plant in drills from two to three 
feet apart, according to the space and how to be cultivated afterwards. Field culture, two 
and a half to three feet apart; for garden, two feet will answer. We plant potatoes here 
from end of December to end of March, but the surest time is about the first of February. 
If planted earlier they should be planted deeper than if planted late, and hilled up as 
they grow. If potatoes are planted shallow and not hilled soon, they will suffer more, 
if caught by late frost, than if planted deep and not hilled up well. Early potatoes have 
not the same value here as in the North, as the time of planting, which is so long, and 
very often the first planting gets cut down by a frost, and a late planting, which may just be 
peeping through the ground, will escape and produce in advance of the first planted. 
A fair crop of potatoes can be raised here if planted in August; if the autumn is not too 
dry, they will bring nice tubers by the end of November. They should not be cut if 
planted at this time of the year, but planted whole and should be put in a moist place 
before planting, so they may sprout. The early varieties are preferable for this time of 
planting. 

It is our determination to sell only such Seeds as have increased our 
business to its present large proportions. 



66 



THE SEED ANNUAI< OF THE 



Several thousand barrels of seed potatoes are sold b}' our firm during the season. We 
make Seed Potatoes a specialt}-. The potatoes we sell are Eastern grown, which, as every 
one interested in potato culture knows, are superior and preferable to Western grown. 

Mr. Frotscher had tried and introduced all new kinds here; but of late so man\' have 
come out that it is almost impossible to keep up with them. New ^'arieties of potatoes 
come out with fanc}' prices, but these prices for new potatoes do not pay here, as we can 
keep none over for seed, and any person raising for the market would not realize a cent 
more for a new fancy varietv per barrel, than for a barrel of good Peerless or Early Rose. 
Earliness is no consideration, as we plant from December to end of March. Somebody 
may plant Earh^ Rose in December and another in February, and those planted in Feb- 
ruary come to the market first; it depends entirely upon the season. 

Up to now the Peerless is the standard variety. Among the new kinds tried here we 
find the White Elephaiit to be a fine potato. It is a very strong grower, tubers oblong, 
very productive and good quality and flavor. It is late, and will come in at the end of 
the season, if planted with the earlier varieties. The Extra Earh' Vermont. Beauty of 
Hebron, Snowflake and Early Rose for early and Peerless, White Elephant and Rural 
New Yorker for late, are -^s good varieties as exist, and it is not likely that we will have 
anything better b}' new introductions. The Rural Blush, which was introduced some 
years ago. may be added to the late varieties; it is of excellent quality, strong grower and 
yields heavil}-. Most people are not careful enough in selecting their seed. Some of the 
potatoes sold in this market for seed are not fit for planting. 

Early Rose. White ElephaJit. 

B^eese' s Peerless. Rural Blush. 

Extra Early Vermont. Rural New Yorker No. 2. 

Beautv of Hebron. Early Trhi'tnph. 

Pride of the South. 
The above varieties were tried on the grounds of the Louisiana Experiment Station at 
Calhoun, La., and Audubon Park, New Orleans, among 150 different kinds tested they 
gave about the best results, both in yield and quality. 

Early Rose. This is, without an}- 
doubt, the best potato for the table. It is 
oval, very shallow-eyed, pink skinned, 
very dry, and mealy when boiled. It has 
not become so popular as it deserves as a 
market variety, as pink or red potatoes do 
not sell so well here as the white kinds. 
This variet}' should not be planted too soon, 
from the fact that they make small stalks, 
and if cut down b}' frost, they suffer more 
than other varieties; but they want rich, 
light soil to grow to perfection 




Earl-v 




Breese's Peerless. 



No Western stock palmed off for Eastern; no misrepresentation, 



RICHARD PROTSCHBR SEED CO., Ltd 



67 



Breese*s Peerless. Several years ago 
this variety was introduced, yet at present 
it is the leading kind for market as well as 
for family use. Skin dull white, sometimes 



slightly russetted ; eyes few and shallow, 
round, occasionally oblong; grows to a large 
size; very productive, and earlier than the 
Jackson White. As white potatoes are more 




Extra Early Vermont. 




Rural New Yorker No. 2. 



In our heavy alluvial soil late Potatoes do better than early ones 
Early varieties prefer a lig'ht and sandy soil. 



68 



Tun sb:^d annuai, of the 



salable than pinkish kinds, and as this 
variety is handsome in appearance and of 
good quality, it has become the general 
favorite in this section. 

Wliite Elephant. This variety has 
again given entire satisfaction. The tubers 
are large and of excellent quality; planted 
alongside the Peerless, it produced fully one 
third more than that variety. 

Rural Blush. Second early, tubers 
roundish flattened, blush skin, flesh slighted 
with pink. Very dry and of , excellent 
quality. A heavy yield^r and good keeper. 

Extra Early Vermont. Very similar 
to the Early Rose, but of a stonger growth; 
a little earlier, and the tubers are more 
uniform and larger. It is an excellent table 
variety. 

Rural New Yorker No. a. Of recent 
introduction. This potato is the nearest to 
perfection of any yet introduced, and ex- 
ceeds all others in yield. It is of large size, 
very smooth skin; few eyes, distinct and 
shallow. Flesh very white, of excellent 
table quality. 

Early Triumph. An early variety of 
good quality; cultivated extensively in Ten- 
nessee and other Southern localities for 
shipping to Northern markets. It is of a 
nice round shape, light red in color; earlier 



than the Early Rose and more prolific. 

Beauty of Hebron. We have tried 
this variet}' thoroughly and found it in 
every particular as has been represented. It 
is earlier than the Early Rose, which resem- 
bles it very much, being a little lighter and 
more russetted in color. It is productive 
and of excellent table quality; more mealy 
than the Early Rose. 

Pride of the South. A variety tried 
here for the first time two years ago. It 
is a white potato, round in shape, of ex- 
cellent quality, extra early and prolific. 

Snowflake Potato. This is one of the 
earliest white Potatoes that we know of. It 
is of excellent quality, flesh pure white and 
very mealy when boiled, and superior to 
the Peerless for family use, for which pur- 
pose we recommend it highly. 

Improved Beauty of Hebron Potato. 

This Potato is of recent introduction, and 
promises to become one of the earliest and 
best potatoes in cultivation. It is a hybrid 
of the Peerless and Beauty of Hebron ; be- 
ing a seedling of the former it is hardier 
than most of the Early Red varieties. In 
color and shape it resembles the Old Beauty 
of Hebron; but is superior in quality and 
earlier. Recommend same for Early Market 
planting, also for family use. 



THE SWEET POTATO. 

Convolvulus Batatas. 

The Sweet Potato is, next to corn, the most important food crop in the South. It is a 
wholesome and nutritious diet, good for man and beast. Though cultivated to a limited 
extent on the sandy lands of New Jersey and some of the Middle States, it thrives best on 
the light rich lands of the South, which bring their red and golden fruits to greatest per- 
fection under the benign rays of a Southern sun. It is a plant of a warm climate, a child 
of the sun, much more nutritious than the Irish Potato on account of the great amount of 
saccharine matter it contains, and no Southern table should be found without it from first 
day of August till the last day of May. Some plant early in spring the Potato itself in 
the prepared ridges, and cut the vine from the potato when large enough, and plant them 
out; others start the potatoes in a bed prepared expressly for thai purpose, and slip off the 
sprouts as they come up; and set these out. The latter method will produce the earliest 
potatDes; others who set the vines, say that they make the largest tubers. In preparing 
the land the soil should be thoroughly pulverized, the ridges laid off about five feet apart, 
well drawn up and rather flat on top. If everything is ready, and time for planting has 
arrived, do not wait for a rain, make a paste of clay and cow manure; in this dip the roots 
of the slips and press the earth firmly around them. Old slips are more tenacious of life 
than young ones, and will under favorable circumstances answer best. Watering after- 
wards, if dry weather continues, of course, will be necessary. Otherwise plant your vines 
and slips just before or after a rain. Two feet apart in rows is considered a good distance. 
The ridges should never be disturbed by a plow from the time they are made until the po- 
tatoes are ready to be dug. 

Scrape off the grass and young weeds with the hi^e, and pull up the large ones by hand. 
Crab grass is peculiarly inimical to the sweet potato, and should be carefully kept out of 
the patch. The vine should never be allowed to take root between the rows. Sweet 
potatoes should be dug before a heavy frost occurs; a very light one will do no harm. The 
earth should be dry enough to keep it from sticking to the potatoes. The old fashioned 
potato bank is the best arrangement for keeping them, the main points being a dry place 
and ventilation. 

Varieties generally cultivated in the South: 

During the planting season we ivill keep a Fine Stock of the 
most suitable varieties of Sweet Potatoes on hand. 



RICHARD FROTSCHER SEED CO., I,td. 



69 



Shanghai, or California Yam. This 
is the earliest variety we have, frequently, 
under favorable circumstances, giving good 
sized tubers two months after planting the 
vine. Very productive, having given 300 
bushels per acre when planted early and on 
rich land. Is almost the only kind culti- 
vated for the New Orleans market. Skin 
dull white or yellow, flesh white, dry and 
mealy, in large specimens frequently 
stringy. 



The Yam. Taking into consideration 
quality and productiveness, the Yam stands 
at the head of the list. Frequently, when 
baked the saccharine matter in the shape of 
candy will be seen hanging to them in 
strings. Skin and flesh yellow and very 
sweet. Without a doubt the best potato for 
family use. 

Southern Queen. Very similar to the 
former, buL smoother, the tubers having no 
veins or very fe%; it is earlier. 

There are some other varieties of Sweet Potatoes highly prized in the West, but not ap- 
preciated here. The red and yellow Nansemond are of a fine quality and productive, but 
will not sell so well as the California Yam when taken to market, For home consump- 
tion they are fine, and deserve to be cultivated. 

PUMPKIN. 
PoTiRON (Fr. ), KURBISS (Ger.), Cai^abaza (Span.), Zucca (Ital.) 

Are o-enerally grown in the field, with the exception of the Cashaw, which is planted in 
the garden; but great care must be taken not to plant them close to Squashes or Melons, 
as they will mix and spoil their quality. Plant in hills from eight to twelve feet 
apart. 

Kentucky Field. " \ Cashaw Crook Neck. {Green Striped.) 

Laro-e Cheese. Golden Yellow Matnmoth. 

Kentucky Field. Large 

round, soft shell, salmon color; 

very productive; best for stock. 

I<arge Cheese- This is ot 
a bright orange, sometimes sal- 
mon color, fine grained, and 
used for table or stock feeding. 

Cashaw Crook Neck. 

Extensively cultivated in the 
South for table use. There are 
two kinds, one all yellow and 
the other green striped with 
light yellow color. The latter 
is the preferable kind; the flesh 
is finfe grained, yellow, very 
sweet, and better than any 
Winter Squash. It keeps well, 
and takes the place here of the 
Winter Squashes, which are 
very little cultivated. The 
striped variety has been culti- 
vated here since a century and 
never was found North or West; 
since a few years it has been 
brought out by Northern Seeds- 
men as "Japan Pie Pump- 
kin." We had this kind grown 
alongside of the Southern 
Striped Cashaw aud found it 
one and the same. 

Golden Yellow Mam- 
moth. This is a very large 
Pumpkin. Flesh and skin are 
of a bright golden color, fine 
grained, and of good quality. 
Some were brought to the store 
weighing one hundred to one 
hundred and fifty pounds, raised 
on land which was not manured 
or fertilized. Golden Yellow Mammoth. 




Green Striped Cashaw Crook Neck. 




Our Cashaw Pumpkin Seed is g-atheped from the best selected speci- 
mens g'rown in our State, and are of the genuine type. 



70 



th:^ snmy annuai/ of thk 



RADISH. 

Radies [Fr.], Radies, Rettig [Ger.J, Rabano [Sp]., Rafano, Rafanei.i.o [Ita.] 
This is a popular vegetable, and grown to a large extent. The ground for radishes should 
be rich and mellow. The earl}^ small varieties can be sown broad -cast among other crops^ 
such as beets, peas, spinach, or w'here lettuce has been transplanted. Barly varieties are 
sown in this section the whole 3'ear, but during summer they require frequent watering to 
make them grow quickly. The Goldon Globe and White Summer Turnip are best for 
planting during the summer months. The Half Long Scarlet French is the only red kind 
raised for the New Orleans market, and all the other cities in the United States taken to- 
gether do not use as many of that one variety as New Orleans does. Nearly two thousand 
pounds of the seed is annually sold in our store to market gardeners. 



Early Long Scarlet. 

Chai'tier's Long. 

Early Scarlet Turnip. 

Golden Globe. 

Early Scarlet Olive-shaped. 

White Summer Turnip. 

Scarlet Half Long French. 

' :Early I/Ong Scarlet, This is a desir- 
able variety; of a bright scarlet color; short 
top and brittle. 

Early Scarlet, Olive-Shaped, This 
is similar to the Half Long French, but 
shorter, and quite so bright in color. It is 
earlv and of good quality. Top short. 

White Summer Turnip. A good 
summer and fall variety. Oblong shape, 
skin white, stands the heat well, but not 
much used. 



Scarlet Olive-shaped, White-Tipped or 

French Breakfast. 
Black Spanish (Winter.) 
Chinese Base ( Winter.) 
White Strashurgh, 
White California Mammoth. 



A long Ra- 



Chartier's Long Radish. 

dish, described as deep crimson colored at 
the top, shading off lighter until at the bot- 
tom it becomes white. 

Early Scarlet Turnip, A small round 
variety, the favorite kind for family use. It 
is very early ^ crisp and mild when young.. 

Golden Globe. This stands the heat 
better than the foregoing kinds. It is of an 





Earlj Scarlet Turnip. 




Early Long Searlct Eadish. 



Golden Globe. 



Years of experience in the Southern trade g-ives us a superiority over 

our competitors. 



RICHARD FROTSCHBR SEED CO., I,td. 



71 



oblong shape, and of a beautiful bright 
yellow color. It should be sown very thin- 
ly. Best adapted for summer and fall sow- 
ing. The variety we lieep is of the finest 
strain, and as good as any ever sold. 

Scarlet Half I/ongf French. This is 
the most popular Radish for the market. 
It is of a bright scarlet color, and when well 
grown, from two to three inches long, very 
brittle and tender. 

White Strasburgh. A variety of recent 
introduction, of an oblong, tapering shape; 
the skin and flesh are pure white, firm, brit- 
tle and tender, and has a tendency of re- 
taining its crispness even when the roots 
are old and large. It is a very good kind 
for summer use. as it withstands the severe 
heat, and grows very quickly. The seed 
can be planted throughout the summer, and 
fine large roots will be rapidly formed. Ex- 
cellent for family use, as well as for the 
market. 

Scarlet Olive-Shaped. White tipped, 
or French Breakfast. A handsome 
Radish of the same shape as the foregoing 
kind, with end and root white. Quite ten- 
der. 

Black Spanish. (Winter.) This is 
sown during fall and early winter. It is 
oval in shape, solid, and stands consider- 
able cold weather without being hurt. It 
can be sown broadcast between Turnips or 




Scarlet Half Long French 
planted in rows a foot apart; thinned out 
from three to 'four inches in the rows. 

Chinese Rose. (Wintkr.) Of a half 
long shape, and bright rose color. It is as 
hardy as the last described, not so popular, 
but superior to the foregoing kind. Con- 
sider it the best winter variety. 

White California Mammoth. A win- 
ter variety of large size, but can be sown 
herein early spring. It is the largest of all 
Radishes, and grows from 8 to 12 inches 
long, 2 to 3 in diameter. 



roqtjktt:!^. 

ROQUETTE (Fr.), RoCKKT TGer.), RoouET (Sp.), RoCHET ("Ital.;. 

Is used as a salad like cress, which it resembles very much. It is sown from Septem- 
ber to March. 



SAI^SIFY, or OYSTl^R PI^ANT. 

SAI.SIFIS (Fr.), Haferwurzei, (Ger.), Barba Cabruna fSp.), Sassifica (Ital.). 

A vegetable which ought to be more cultivated than it is. It is prepared in different 
ways, and partakes of the flavor of oysters. It should be sown in the fall of the year; not 
later than November. The ground ought to be manured the spring previous, deeply 
spaded, and well pulverized. Sow in drills about ten inches apart, and thin out from 
three to foiir inches in the rows. 




Sandwich Island Mammoth Salisfy. 



Sandwich Island Salsify. (Mam- 
moth.) This is a sort that grows much 
quicker than the old varieties. It attains a 



large size; can be called with right mam- 
moth. It is very superior to the old kinds 
and should be generally cultivated. 



Our selection of Seeds may be considered the Best in the South. 



72 



THE SEED ANNUAL OF THE 



SPINACH. 

Epixard [Fr.]. Spixat [Ger. ], Espixago [Sp.], Spixacia [Ital.] = 

A great deal of this is raised for the New Orleans market. It is very popular. Sown 
from September to the end of March. If the fall is dry and hot. it is useless to sow it,. as 
the seeds require moisture and cool nights to make them come up 
the lareer the leaves. 



The richer the ground 



Extra Large Leaved Savoy. 

Extra Larg^e Leaved Savoy. The 

leaves of this variety are large, thick and a 
little curled. Verv o-ood for familv use. 



Broad Leaved Flanders. 

Broad Leaved Flanders. This is the 
standard variety, both for market and fam- 
ily vise. Leaves large, broad and succulent. 



SORREL. 

OsEiLivE [Fr.], Saukrampfer [Ger.]. Acedera [Sp.]. Acetosa [Ital.]. 

Planted in drills a foot apart, during the fall of the year, and thinned out from three 
to four inches in the drills. Sorrel is used for various purposes in the kitchen. It is used 

the same as Smnach; also in soup and as salad. 



SaiJASH, 

GorRGE [Fr.]. Speise Kurbiss [Ger.], Calaba2a Toxtaxera [Sp.]. CocrzzA 

Friscareeea [Ital.]. 

Sow during March in hills from three to four feet apart, sis to eight seeds. When well 
up thin them out to three of the strongest plants. For a succession they can be planted as 
late as June. Some who protect by boxes, plant as soon as the first of February, but it is 
best to wait until the ground gets warm. When it is time to plant Corn, it is also time to 
plant Squash r 



Early Bush, or Patty Pan. 

Long Green, or Sununer Crook Neck, 

Early Bush, or Patty Pan. Is the 

earliest and only popular kind here. All 
other varieties are verv little cultivated, as 



The Hubbard. 
Boston JLarrozi'. 

Long Green, or Summer Crook- 
Neck. This is a strong grower, and con- 
tinues in bearing lon^-er than the first named 



the Green Striped Cashaw Pumpkin takes I kind. It is of good quality, but not so 
their place. It is of dwarfish habit, grows | popular, 
bushy and does not take much room. Qual- | 
itv as eood as anv. I 





Early Bush or Patty Pjm. 



Long Green or .Suminer Crook Xeck, 



OuF Spinach Seed is Amepiean gpown and of Pepfect Gepminating- 

Qualities. It should not be sown thoug-h before cool weathep, 

as it will not sppout duping hot weathep. 



RICHARD FROTSCHBR SEED CO., I^td. 



73 



The Hubbard. This is a Winter Squash 
highly esteemed in the Hast, but hardly 
cultivated here. It is, if planted here, 
inferior to the Southern Striped Cashaw 
Pumpkin which can be kept from one season 
to another, and is superior in flavor to the 
former kind. 

Boston Marrow. Cultivated to a large 
extent North and East for winter use, where 
it is used for custards, etc. It keeps for a 
long time and is of excellent quality, but 

not esteemed here, as most people consider 
the Southern grown Cashaw Pumpkin supe- 
rior to any winter Squash. 




The Hubbard. 



TOMATO 

ToMATE [Fr.], LiKBKSAPFEiv [Ger.], Tomate [Sp.], Pomo d'Oro [Ital.] 

Seed should be sown in January, in hot beds, or in boxes, which must be placed in a 
sheltered spot, or near windows. In March they can be sown in open ground. Tomatoes 
are generally sown too thick and become too crowded when two or three inches high, 
which makes the plants thin and spindly. If they are transplanted when two or three 
inches high, about three inches apart each way, they will become short and sturdy, and 
will not suffer when planted into the open ground. Plant them from three to four feet 
apart. Some varieties can be planted closer; for instance, the Extra Earl}', which is of 
very dwarfish habit, two and a half feet apart is enough. 

They should be supported by stakes. When allowed to grow up wild, the fruit which 
touches the ground will rot. For a late or fall crop the seed should be sown toward the 
latter part of May and during June. 



King of the Earlies. 
Extra Early Dwarf. 
Horsforcfs Prelude. 
Dwarf Champion. 
Early Large Smooth Bed. 
Selected Trophy. 
Horsford's Daybreak. 
The Democrat. 




Extra Earlv Dwarf. 



Large Yellow, 
Acme. 
Paragon. 

Livingstones Perfection. 
Livingston's Favorite. 
Livingston s Beauty. 
Neiv Imperial. 
The Autocrat. 

Extra Early Dwarf. This is the 
earliest in cultivation. It is dwarfish in 
habit, fruit larger than the following kind, 
and more flat; bright scarlet in color and 
very productive. For an early market 
variety it cannot be surpassed. 

Horsford's Prelude. This is a valu- 
able variety on account of being very early. 
The skin is very tough and perfectly free 
from rot. Fruit medium in size. It is of 
excellent flavor, specially adapted for 
forcing as well as outdoor culture. 

Dwarf Champion. This is a distinct 
kind. The plants grow stiff and upright, 
and need no support as other kinds. Can 
be planted closely together, three feet apart. 
It is early and productive; the fruit re- 
sembles the Acme; but is of lighter color, 
ripens up even and does not crack. When 
room is an object this sort is recommended. 



Fop the Early Market we recommend Horsfopd's Prelude Tomato. 



74 



THE SEED ANNUAL OF THE 



Early Large Smooth Red. An early 
kind of medium size; smooth and produc- 
tive. 

Large Yellow. This is similar in shape 
to the Large Red, but more solid. Not very 
popular. 

Livingston's Perfection. Very simi- 
lar to the foregoing in shape but of a fine 
red color. 

Paragon. A very solid variety, of a 
bright reddish crimson color, comes in 
about the same time as the Tilden, but is 
heavier in foliage and pratects its fruit. It 
is productive and keeps long in bearing. 



Well adapted for shipping. 

King of the Earlies- This variety was. 
introduced here a few years ago. It is very 
early and productive; color brig:ht red. of 
good size and quite solid. The vine is me- 
dium, stout and branching. The buds ap- 
pear soon, blossoms as a rule adhere and 
produce fruit. It is so much earlier, than 
the Livingston varieties, that it should be 
planted for the first. The latter kind are sa 
handsome in shape that they will sell better 
than any other> when the market is once 
well supplied. 




Horsford's Prelude. 



During the proper season we will be able to supply Plants of the Best 

Varieties. 



RICHARD FROTSCH^R SEBB CO., Ltd. 



7o 



Acme. One of the prettiest and 
most solid Tomatoes ever intro- 
duced. It is of a medium size, 
round and very smooth, a strong 
grower, and a good and long 
hearer. It is the perfection of 
Tomatoes for family use, but will 
not answer for shipping purposes; 
the skin is toe tender, and cracks 
when fully ripe. Of all the varieties 
introduced, none has surpassed this 
kind when all qualities are brought 
into consideration. It does well 
about here where the ground is 
heavy. 

I/ivitigston's Favorite. 
This Tomato is as perfect in shape 




Dwarf Champion. 




Kinar of Earlies. 



For Family Use try the New Imperial Tomato. 



76 



TH:E SEieD ANNUAI, OF TH:^ 



and as solid as the Acme, but much 
larger, and of a handsome dark red 
color. We had some sent to our 
store by a customer, and they 
surely were the finest specimen of 
tomatoes we ever saw, and were 
admired by everybody who saw 
them. They will keep well, and 
do not crack. It has become the 
standard variety for this-market. 

Selected Trophy. A very 
large, smooth Tomato, more solid 
and heavier than any other kind. 
Has become a favorite variety. 

I^iviiigs ton's Beauty. This 
variety is quite distinct in color, 
being a ver)' glossy crimson with a 
light tinge of purple, (lighter than 
the Acme). It ripens with the 
Acme or Paragon, but keeps 
longer. It is very perfect in shape 
and does not crack, like some of 
the thin skinned sorts. 




Acme Tomato- 




Paragon. 




Livingston's Favorite. 



Oiily such varieties are Tiept in stock as are adapted to our 

climate and soil. 



RICHARD FROTSCHER SEE^D CO., I/td. 



77 




Livingston's Beauty. 



Two Standard Varieties for the Market of Excellent Quality and Fine 

Shape. 



78 



THE SEED ANNUAI, OF THE 



New Imperial Tomato. This 

Tomato originated with Mr. A. A. 
Halladay, of Vermont; he claims 
it to be the earliest and smoothest 
of all Extra Early Tomatoes ever 
introduced. In color it is between 
Dwarf Champion and Beauty;very 
productive and ripens evenly to 
stem. 

The originator saj^s: "In my trials 
of all the leading varieties so called 
best and earliest, this new tomato 
has always come out ahead from lo 
to 22 days in ripening." It is 
worthy of trial. Have seed direct 
from originator. 




New Imperial Tomato. 




( i 



HORSFORD'S DAYBREAK" TOMATO 

THE EARWEST LARGE TOMATO. 



RICHARD FROTSCHER SHED CO., Ltd. 



79 



Horsford's "Daybreak Tomato" 

The originator of this tomato claims it to be 
earlier and larger than the Dwarf Champion; 
also more prolific. 

The following is a description given by 
him: This is the result of a cross between 
the Mayflower (which originated with me 
in 1878) and the Trophy. My aim in this 
selection of parents who was to produce an 
early variety of better size and shape than 
the earliest already on the market. It has 
fully met my expectations. Plants were 
grown side by side with the Dwarf Cham- 
pion from seeds sown at the same time and 
'"Daybreak" produced the first ripe fruit 
both last year and this. The entire crop is 
proportionally early. The fruit of "Day- 
break" is full}'^ a third larger than that of 
the Dwarf Champion and there is n: ore than 
double the quantity. Its color is bright red 



like the Trophy; it is quite as solid, and 
when mature is a smooth as the Mayflower. 
Its foliage is distinct from all other toma- 
toes, being of a very dark green. So mark- 
ed is this charactersitic that one might easi- 
ly tell a plant of "Daybreak" among a 
thousand of any other sort. 

The above illustration shows a cluster of 
this Tomato, and a section cut so as to show 
the solidity of the fruit. The cluster of 
three here represented, weighed 29 onces 
when taken from the vine. 

Only sold in packages. 
The Autocrat and Democrat 
Tomato. These two new varieties were 
brought out two years ago for the first time 
and they have given perfect satisfaction. 
They are very prolific and ripen evenly 
about the stem; recommend them highly for 
family use. 



» 



TURNIP. 

NaveT (Fr.), RuEBK (Ger.j, Nabo Comun (Sp.), Navone (Ita.) 

Turnips do best in new ground. When the soil has been worked long, it should re- 
ceive a top dressing of land-plaster or ashes. If stable manure is used the ground should 
be manured the spring previous to sowing, so it ma}' be well incorporated with the soil. 
When fresh manure is used the turnips are apt to become speckled. S6w from end of 
July to October for fall and Winter, and in January, February and March for spring and 
summer use. They are generally sown broad-cast, but the Ruta Baga should be sown in 
drills, cr rather ridges, and should not be sown later than the end of August; the Golden 
Ball and Aberdeen, not later than the end of September. The White Flat Dutch, Early 
Spring and Pomeranian Globe are best for spring, but also good for autumn. 



Early Red or Purple Top (strap-leaved) 

Early White Elat Dutch (strap-leaved.) 

Turnip Top Globe. 

Large White Globe. 

Pomeranian Globe. 

White Spring. 

Yellow Aberdeen. 

Barly Red or Purple Top. [Strap - 
Leaved.] This is one of the most popular 
kinds. It is flat, with a small tap-root, and 
a bright purple top. The leaves are narrow 
and grow erect from the bulb. The flesh is 
finely grained and rich. 

Early White Flat Dutch. [Strap- 
Leaved.] This is similar to the above in 
shape, but considered about a week earlier. 
It is very popular. 

Purple Top Globe. Of same shape as 
the Pomeranian Globe, but with purple top. 
Fine variety for table or stock. It is not 
quite SO- early as the Early Red or Purple 
Top. We recommend it very highly. 

I<arge "White Globe. A very large 



Golden Ball. 
Amber Globe. 
Early Purple Top Munich. 
Improved Ruta Baga. 
Long Island Purple Top Ruta Baga. 
Extra Early White French, or White 
Egg Turnip. 




Munich Extra Early Purple Top. 



The above varieties of Tomatos are Novelties and have only been 

tried since two years here, but gave entire satisfaction. It 

is hardly possible to test an article properly in such a short 

time, especially as the price of the seed was so high 

that only amateur gardeners and private families 

could give them a trial. To our knowledge none 

of the Fruit has been brought to the market yet. 



80 



THE SE:^D ANNUA!, OF THE 



kind, mostl}- grown for stock. It can be 
used for the table when 3-oung. Flesh 
coarse, but sweet; tops very large. 

Extra Early Purple Top Munich. 
A new kind from Germany; flat, with red or 
purple top; same as the American variety. 
but fifteen days earlier to mature. It is 
very hard}-, tender, and of fine flavor. 

White Spring. This is similar to the 
White Flat Dutch; not quite so large, but 



round in shape. The tops are large, it is 
early, a good quality, and best adapted for 
spring planting. 

Yellow Aberdeen. This is a variety 
ver}- little cultivated here. It is shaped like 
the Ruta Baga, color ^-ellow with purple top. 
Good for table use or feeding stock. 

Robertson's Golden Ball, is the best 
of the Yellow Turnips for table use. It is 
very smooth, oval in shape, and of a beau- 




Turnips are g-enerally sown too thick by our g-ardeners. One pound 

of seed will sow one acre. 



RICHARD FR0TSCH:^R Sl^ED CO., I^td. 



81 



tiful orange color. Leaves are small. Should 
be sown in the fall of the year, and alwa3S 
in drills, so that the plants can be thinned 
out and worked. This kind ought to be 
more cultivated. 

Amber Globe. This is very similar to 
the above kind. 

Ivarge Cow Horn. A long white varie- 

Pomeranian Globe. A selec- 
tion of the White Globe. It is 
smoother and handsomer in shape; 
good to plant early in spring. 
When pulled before it is too large, 
it is very saleable turnip in the 
market. 

Improved Purple Top Ruta 
Bag^a. This is grown for feeding 
stock, and also for table use. It is 
oblong in shape, yellow flesh, very 
solid. Should always be sown in 
rows or ridges, 

I^ong Island Purple Top 
Ruta Baga. This kind is purely 
of American orgin. The root is 
smoother than the foregoing 
variety; the flesh is of golden yel- 
low, fine grained and solid; it 
matures earlier than the above. 
The stock we have is expressly 
grown for us on Long Island and 
can not be surpassed. Can not be 
too highly recommended. 

Extra i^arly White French, 
or White Egg Turnip. This is 
a lately introduced variety; is said 
to be ver}'^ early, tender and crisp. 
The shape of it is oblong, resem- 
bling an egg. Having tried it we 
found it as represented, quickl)' 
growing, tender and sweet. It will 
never become a favorite market 
variety, as only flat kinds sell well 
here. Ithastobe pulled up soon, 
as it becomes pithy shortly after 
attaining maturity. 



ty of very good quality, shaped like a cow's 
horn, from which the name. It is good for 
feeding stock. 

Sweet German, or Hanover. Re- 
sembles the Ruta Baga in growth; it is a 
white flesh variety, very solid arid sweet. If 
sown in the fall will keep well until spring 
without getting pithy like the flat varieties. 




Pomeraniau Globe. 



When young, the White Egg is the best table Turnip. 



82 



THB sk:ed anntjai, of the^ 




Improved Purple Top Euta Baga^ 



Turnips should be larg'ely planted for stock food, they are excellent 

for winter feeding. 



RICHARD frotsch:er se:i5d CO., i/ta. 



83 



Sweet and Medicinal Herbs. 



Some of these herbs possess culinar}' as well as medicinal properties. Should be 
found in every garden. Ground where they are to be sown should be well prepared and 
pulverized. Some of them have very fine seed, and it is only necessary, after the seed is 
sown, to press the ground with the back of the spade; if covered too deeply they cannot 
•come up. Early spring is the best time to sow them— some, such as Sage, Rosemary, La- 
vender and Basil, are best sown iia a frame and afterwards transplanted into the garden. 



Anise. Pinipinella Anisum. 

Balm, Melissa Officinalis. 

Basil , large and small leaved^ Ocymum 

Rasilicum. 
Bene, Sesainuin Orientale . 
Borage, Borago Officinalis. 
Caraway, Caruin Carvi. 
Dill, Aneihum Graveolens. 
Fennel, sweet. Anethum Foeniculum. 
iva vender, Lavandula Vera^ 



Marjoram, sweet, Origanum Majofa- 

num. 
Pot Marigold, Calendida Officinalis. 
Rosemary, Rosmarinus Officinalis . _'] 
Rue, Ruta Graveolens. ..;._ 

Sage, Salvia Officinalis. 
Summer Savory, Satureju Hortensis. 
Thyme, Thymus Vulgaris. 
Wormwood. Artemisia Absinthium. 



-:o: 



Farmers' Book on Grasses. 



As the compass of this Seed Annual is too small to give full description of the different 
varieties of Forage Plants which are listed by us, we would advise our patrons to consult 
^'Dr. D. G. Phares' Farmers' Book on Grasses.'" It is the most valuable work of this 
kind ever published in the South, and should be in the hands of every one who takes an 
interest in the cultivation of grasses. 

Copies for sale at publisher's prices. Paper covor, 25c; Cloth cover, 35c, postpaid. 



■:o: 



Tobacco Seeds. 



Impofted Havana. We imported from one of the principal growers the finest and 
purest strain of Vuelta Abajo, w^hich is considered the best of Havana varieties. 
Price, 10 cents per package — 40 cts. per oz , ^4.00 per lb. 
Connecticut Seed IVeaf. A well-known American variety. 
Price, 10 cts. per package — 25 cts. per oz., ^2.50 per lb. 

The Best is the Cheapest. Oup Seeds are strictly Pure, perfectly fresh 
and will not fail to come up if properly treated, 



f 

84 THE SEED ANNUAI, OF THE 



GRASSES AND FORAGE PLANTS. 



Farming must of necessity go hand in liand with stock raising, and in order to be suc- 
cessful our Farmers must pay more attention to Forage Plants and not rely too much on 
our native Grasses. It is true, our prairies and meadcws show almost the entire year a 
luxuriant growth of grasses and weeds, some of which are valuable, while the greater por- 
tion is valueless, as it does not always afford suflBcient nourishing stock food and is entirely 
unfit for hay. 

In winter time, when the few good varieties have become hard and tough, it is impos- 
sible for stock to find any good digestible food, and it is therefore to the farmers interest 
to provide good winter pasturage. 

Often the question is asked what kind of Grass Seed is the best and most suitable for 
this latitude, but it is hardly possible to answer this question satisfactory. 

For pasturing our list of grasses must be considered" the best, for hay German Millet. 
Alfalfa and Bermuda may be considered the best. 

Experience has taught us that none of the northern and western varieties will form 
a permanent pasture here and that none but the Bermuda and our native grasses, such as 
the Paspalums will stand the hot raj'sof our summer sun and not get parched out in nr.d- 
Summer. Paspalums would be decidedly the best for hay. but up the presert lime no set d 
could be obtained yet as no one paid any attention to their culture. 

Barley, Rye, Wheat, Oats. Rescue, Orchard. Red Top. Kentucky Blue and Fescue 
Grass, make excellent winter pasturage in our climate, but will die out at the approach of 
warm weather. 

Of late years the Lespedeza striata or Japan Clover, has been largely sown here and 
has given entire satisfaction in poor and san,dy soil, also the Burr Clover, but we doubt 
whether our rich and heavy alluvial soil would suit them. 

Perhaps the best and certainly the only grass for permanent pasturage would be the 
Bermuda, it is very good for hay. But it grows rather short unless land is fertile, in our 
climate where our summers are long and hot and other varieties with the exception of 
our native grasses and obnoxious weeds are scarce. Bermuda is of great value, especially 
as it stands drouth as well as wet weather and our coldest winters as well as the summers 
heat. Some years ago the planting of Guinea Grass was advocated, and some of our Plant- 
ers tried it extensively, only to lose it the first winter. 

Judging from its rapid and vigorous growth and the immense amount of roots it pro- 
duces, it would certainly appear to be very hardv, but it is rather tender and will freeze out 
almost every winter. It will ptoduce a large quantity of green fodder, but has been resown 
every spring 

Johnson Grass, which resembles Guinea Grass very much and of which the seed often 
has been sold for Guinea, has been sown by some of our planters, but as it is so difl&cult 
to exterminate when it has taken hold of a piece of ground, it is generally objected to. In 
high land with a deep subsoil Alfalfa and Red Clover will do well but in w-et or low land it 
is of no use sowing the former as it will not do. 

In regard to sowing and covering Grass seed, we would say. that a harrow^ is not the 
proper implement to do this with. Grass and Clover seeds are small and fine seeds, espe- 
cially some varieties as for instance Timothy, and have no chauce to come up if buried 
deeper ihan a quarter or half an inch in fine soil and even less in our heavy alluvial. 

:o: 



RYE, OATS, WHEAT AND BARI^EY. 

Are largely planted for winter pasturage in our Southern states, and hardh" any other 
forage plant will give as much satisfaction as either of them. 

Their great value for winter pasturage cannot be too highly recommended, especially 
as they come in. if sown at the proper time, w^hen our own native grasses begin to dry up 
and greet' stock food becomes scarce. 

All should be sow-n from the middle of September in succession up to the beginning of 
December at the rate of about i^^ bushels to the acre on well prepared land and covered 
immediately after sowing to prevent the sparrows from picking them up. Of Barley two 
and a half to three bushels should be sown per acre. 

Oats, if it is allowed to grow until the heads are formed and begin to turn 3-ellow dried 
and tied up in bundles it will make an excellent winter food for working horses, milk-cows 
and pigs. ' 



RICHARD FROTSCHER Sn^B CO., I/td. 



85 





Red Oluver 



WINTKR TURF OATS 

A newvariet}', introduced 
only last year by the late R. 
Froischer, has been tried 
here and gave entire satis- 
faction. It is said to be 
entirely Rust Proof and so 
far has not rusted yet. 
One year trial will, of 
course, not be sufficient to 
recommend it as it perhaps 
hould be, but so far it has 
proven to be all that it is 
claimed to be. 

r:^d ciyOv:i5R. 

Trifoliitm pratens. 
This excellent variety 



of 
Clover should be sown 
either during the fall or 
early in the spring, but fall 
planting is preferable as it White Dutch Clover. 

will do much better than spring sown. Six to eiglitpounds of seed is the necessary quan- 
tity to sow an acre. 

WHITER DUTCH CI,OVBR. 

Trifolium repens. 

A good pasture plant, and also excellent for apiarists as it abounds in honey and is 
much sought after by Honey Bees. If fed too much to stock it is very apt to cause them 
to slobber. Should be planted in the fall, at the rate of from 6 to 8 bis. to the acre. 

AI,FAI,FA, FRENCH I,UC]^RNE OR CHII^I CI^OV:i^R. 

Medicago Sativa. 
An excellent Forage plant in high and 
dry land, but it will not do well in our wet 
bottom lands, as it requires a deep and dry 
soil. It is therefore of no use to try Alfalfa 
in wet land. The first year it may grow 
well enough, but the second year when the 
roots reach the water, it is sure to decay, 
as they demand good, rich soil, penetrating 
the earth to a depth of eight to ten feet, and 
consequently, if the plant is checked in its 
downward course by water, it will soon wilt 
and die. When Alfalfa has once taken hold 
in the ground it will last from ten to fifteen 
years, and it is even said that in some places 
where the soil is deep and not very wet it 
has been known to grow over thirty years, 
without showing any signs of decay. 

Where the land is clear of Coco and other 
weeds, it may be sown broadcast, about 
twenty pounds to the acre, and not later 
than December, as the young plants, if 
sown in January or even later, will not make 
sufficient of roots to stand our hot and dry 
summers. If the land is not perfectly clean, 
it should be sown in drills twelve to fifteen 
inches apart, and worked in with a culti- 
vator; in this case it requires from eight to 
ten pounds to the acre. 




^- ,i^!r^^^ 



Alfalfa or Lucerne Clover. 



86 



THE SEED ANNUAI, OF TH:E 



CRIMSON CLOVER. 

TrifoJinni Incarnatuin. 

Crimson Clover, an annual variety, which is a native of a warm climate, has not been 
grown here as extensively as it deserves to be. 

It has been highh- praised up as a forage plant, said to be equally as good for pasturage 
as well as for mowing and to do better in poor worn out soil than any other variety. Our 
experience though has taught us that in poor sandy land it will not thrive. 

It certainly has attracted a good deal of attention in the South the last few years; and 
the reports from Experiment Stations of Louisiana and other Southern States speak highly 
of it. but its true merits "are still in doubt. 

Crimson Clover has been grown for years in the South of France and Germany with 
good results, and it is claimed that, owing to its quick growth it is preferable to other 
varieties. 

As a forage plant it ma}- be mowed twice and then plowed under, thereby acting as a 
fertilizer and renovating the exhausted soil. 

In the Southern States Crimson Clover should be sown in the months of October and 
November. However, it ma}- be sown with good results as late as January or February 
and will produce a fine crop. The demand for this variet}' of Clover has increased con- 
siderably the past few years. 

From 8 to lo pounds should be sown per acre. 

BURR CI/OVER. 

Medicago Maculata. 

A variety brought from Chili to California and thence to the States under the name of 
California Clover. It is often taken for Lucerne to which it bears some resemblance, but 
this name is improperh- applied. The Burr Clover has only two or three yellow blossoms 
in each cluster, while the Lucerne has many blue flowers in an elongated head. It 
furnishes good grazing from February till April or May and is also suitable for hay. 

As there is no way of removing the seeds from the pods of Spotted Medick. it is 
necessary to sow the burr like pods, about one half bushel per acre. The sowing should 
be done earlj' in the Fall, so the pods may have time to rot and release the seed. Cover 
very lightly. 

JAPAN CI^OVER. 

Lespedeza Striata, 

Ever since its introduction, this valuable forage plant has been steadily growing in 
demand, although there has been so much confusion, lack of knowledge and confounding 
with, or mistaking for it another worthless species, especially a small and worthless variety 
of genuine clover, that we deem it necessary to give here a short history and description 
of the plant, with as much of our experience in cultivating it as is necessary- to be suc- 
cessful with. 

Japan Clover has been known to Botanists 
for many generations in its own native habit 
in China, Japan, and other parts of South 
Eastern Asia as an excellent forage plant. 
It spread rapidly over that entire country, 
findirg soil and climate congenial, and in 
but a short time occupied all waste places, 
and to-day every available spot is densely 
covered with it. 

In 1849 the plant appeared first in South 
Carolina. How it was brought there is not 
know, evidently the seed had been brought 
accidently with some goods from China; it 
found suitable soil and grew there and mul- 
tiplied rapidly. The plant became in our 
country of a dwarfish, bush like habit, re- 
ceived the name of Bush Clover, under 
which name it is known to a good many to- 
day yet. 

Since its appearance in the United States 
Japan Clover has multiplied wonderfully; 
it commenced its westward invasion, simul- 
taneously extending its conquests northward Japan Clover. 




RICHARD FROTSCHER SB^D CO., I/td. 



87 



and southward, firmly holding all conquered territory until at the present date it has 
invaded almost the entire of the Southern and Middle States. From the Atlantic seacoast 
across the Mississippi River into the interior of Texas it has spread, and it is but a question 
of time w^hen it may be found over the entire Southern territory. 

Lespedeza will grow almost on any soil from the poorest sand in which it retains it 
dwarfish habit to our rich alluvial bottoms where it attains a great magnitude; on cultivated 
as well as uncultivated soil it will take hold, often even holding equal contest with our 
almost indestructible Bermuda Grass. 

As to its value as a forage plant, opinions greatly differ. Some assert that it is the 
most valuable forage plant for our Southern climate, while others consider it valueless as 
stockfood and even assert as Mr. H. Stewart in the Country Gentleinan for January, 1886, 
that unless starved to it neither cattle nor pigs woiild eat it. In our experience Japan 
Clover has proven to be without exception one of the most valuable plants for stockfood, 
giving good nourishing pasturage from beginning of May until the first frost makes its 
appearance and although cattle may not take kindly to it at first, but tasting it a few limes 
they relish it and become very fond of it for grazing and ha}'. 

Lespedeza should be sown not sooner than the end of February and not later than the 
middle of March, at the rate of a measured half bushel to the acre. 



RBD TOP GRASS. 

Agrostis Vulgaris. 

This is the best grass of England, the 
herd grass of the United States; not in 
honor of any man, but probably, because 
so well adapted to the herd. It is called 
also Fine top, Burden's and Borden's 
Grass. Varying greatly in character, ac- 
cording to soil, location, climate and 
ciilture, some boto.nists have styled it A 
Pohrnorpha. It grows two to three feet 
and often four feet high. It grows well 
on hill tops and sides, in ditches, gullies 
and marshes, but delights in moist bot- 
tom land. It is not injured by overflows, 
though somewhat prolonged. In marshy 
land it produces a very dense, strong net- 
work of roots capable of sustaining the 
weight of men and animals walking over 
it. 

It furnishes considerable grazing dur- 
ing warm "spells" in winter, and in 
spring and summer an abundant supply 
of nutrition. It has a tendency, being 
very hardy, to increase in density of 
growth and extent of surface, and will 
continue indefinitely, though easily sub- 
dued by the plow. 

Cut before maturing seeds, it makes a 
good hay and large quantity. It seems to 
grow taller in the Southern States than it 




Red Top Grass. 



does further North, and to make more and better hay and grazing. Red Top and Timothy, 
being adapted to the same soil and maturing at the same time, do well together and pro- 
puce an excellent hay. But the Red Top will finally root out Timothy, and if pastured 
much it will do so sooner. 

Sow about two bushels (28 lbs.), per acre, if alone, in September, October, February 
or March; if with Timothy for hay, from 6 to 10 pounds; if with other grasses for pasture, 3 
to 5 pounds. It is an excellent pasture grass, and will grow on almost any kind of soil. 

ORCHARD GRASS. 

Dactylis glonierata. 

Of all the grasses this is one of the most widely diffused, growing in Africa, Asia and 
ever}' country in Kurope and all our States. It is more highly esteemed and commended 
than any other grass, by a large number of farmers in most countries — a most decided 
proof of its great value and wonderful adaptation to many soils, climates and treatments. 
Yet, strange to say, though growing in England for many centuries it was not appreciated 
in that country till carried there from Virginia in 1764. 



8S 



THie SEKD ANNUAI, OF THE 



Nor is this strange when its man}- advantages and points of excellence are considered. 
It will grow well on an}- soil containing sufficient cla_v and not holding too much water. 
If the land be too tenacious, drainage will remedy the soil; if worn out, a top dressing of 
stable manure will give it a good send-ofF, and it will furnish several good mowings the 
first year. It grows well^etween 29*^ and 48 ^ latitude. It ma}- be mowed from two to 
four times a year, according to the latitude, season and treatment; yielding from one to 
three tons of excellent hay per acre on poor to medium land. In grazing and as hay. most 
animals select it in preference among mixtures in other grasses. In lower latitudes it 
furnishes good winter grazing, as well as for spring, summer and fall. After grazing, or 
mowing, few grasses grow so rapidly (three to six inches per week), and are so soon ready 
again for tooth or blade. It is easily cured and handled. It is readily seeded and catches 
with certaint}'. Its long, deeply penetrating fibrous roots enable it to sustain itself and 
grow vigorously during droughts that dr\' up other grasses, except tall oat grass, which 
has similar roots and characteristics. The ha}- is of high quality, and the young grass 
contains a larger per centage of nutritive digestible matter than any other grass. It thrives 
well without any renewal on the same ground for thirty-five, nay forty years; how tnuch 
longer, we are rot able to say. 



:0 




Kentuckv Blue Grass, 



KENTUCKY BI^UE GRASS. 

Poa Pratensii . 

This is also called smooth meadow grass, spear grass, and 
green grass, all three very appropriate, characteristic names. But 
Blue is a misnomer for this grass. It is not blue, but green as 
grass, and the greenest of grasses. The P. Conipressa. fla:-stalked 
meadow grass, wire grass, blue grass is blue, 'the true blue' grass 
from which the genus received its trivial name. 

Kentucky blue grass, known also in the Eastern States as 
June grass esteemed in some parts of America ao the best of all 
pasture grasses, is certainly a very desirable pasture grass. Its 
very narrow leaves, two or more feet long, are in such profusion, 
and cover the ground to such depth with their luxuriant growth, 
that a mere description CDuld give no one an adequate idea of its 
beauty, quantity, and value; that is on rich land. On poor, sandy 
land, it degenerates sadly, as do other things uncongenially lo- 
cated. 

Perennial, and bearing cold and drought well, it furnishes 
grazing a large part of the year. It is specially valuable as a 
winter and spring grass for the South. To secure the best winter 
results, it should be allowed a good growth in early fall, so that the end of the leaves. being 
killed by the frost, afford an ample covering for the under-part which continue to grow all 
winter, and afford a good bite whenever required by sheep, cattle, hogs and horses. In 
prolonged summer drought it dries completely, so that, if fired, it w^ould burn off clean. 

Blue grass grow-s well on hill tops, or bottom land, if not too wet and too poor It may 
be sown any time from September to April, preferable perhaps in the latter half of Febru- 
ary, or early in March. The surface of the land should be cleaned of trash of all kinds, 
smooth, even; and if recently plowed and harrowed, it should be rolled also. The last 
proceeding is for compacting the surface in order to prevent the seed from sinking too 
deep in the ground. Without harrowing or brushing in, many of them get in too deep to 
come up, even w-hen the surface of the land has had the roller over it. The first rain after 
seeding \y\\\ put them in deep enough, as the seeds are very minute, and the spears of 
grass small as fine needles, and therefore unable to get out from under heavy cover. These 
spears are so small as to be invisible, except to close examination: and in higher latitudes 
this condition continues through the first year. Thus, some who have sown the blue grass 
seed, seeing the first year no grass. imagine they have been cheated, plant some other crop, 
and probably lose what close inspection would have shown to be a good catch. This, how- 
ever, is not apt to occur in the Southern tier of States, as the growth here is more rapid. 
The sowing mentioned above made on the 20th of March, came up promptly, and in three 
months the grass was from six to ten inches high. One year here gives a finer growth 
and show than two in Kentucky, or any other State so far North. 

Sown alone, 20 to 26 pounds, that is 2 bushels, should be used ; in mixtures, 4 to 6 
pounds. 



RICHARD FROTSCHKR SBBD CO., l^td. 



89 




BNGI.ISH RYE GRASS. 

Loliufn perenne . 

This is the first grass cultivated in England over two 
centuries ago, and at a still more remote period in France. 
It was long more widely known and cultivated than any 
other grass; became adapted to a great variety of soils and 
conditions, and a vast number (seventy or more) of varie- 
ties produced, some of which were greatly improved while 
others were inferior and became annuals. Introduced into 
the United States in the first quarter of the current century 
it has never become very popular, although shown by the 
subjoined analysis of Way not to be deficient in nutritive 
matter. In loo parts of the dried grass cut in bloom were al- 
bumoids 11.85, fatty matter 3.17, heat-producing prin- 
ciples 42.24, wood fibre 35.20, ash 7.54. The more re- 
cent analysis of Wolff and Knopp, allowing for water, gives 
rather more nutritive matter than this. 

It grows rapidly, and yields heavy crops of seed, makes 
good grazing, and good hay. But, as with all the Rye 
Grasses, to make good hay, it must be cut before passing English Rye Grass. 

the blossom stage, as after that it deteriorates rapidl5^ The roots being short, it does not 
bear drought well, and exhausts the soil, dying out in a few years. In these respects it is 
liable to the same objection as Timothy. The stem, one to two feet high, has four to six 
purplish joints and as many dark green leaves; the flexions spiked panicle beating the 
distant spiklets one in each bend. 

It should be sown in August or September, at the rate of twenty-five or thirty pounds 
or one bushel seed per acre. 

TAlyl/ MEADOW OAT GRASS. 

Arrhenatherum avenaecum. 
Evergreen grass in Virginia and other Southern States, and it is a tall oat 
{Avena elafior) of hin^ns. It is closely related to the common oat, and has a beautiful 
open panicle leaning slightly to one side. ''Spikelets cwo flowered, and a rudiment of a 
third, open; lowest flower staminate or sterile, with along bent awn below the middle of 
the back."— [Flint. 

It is widely naturalized and well adapted to a great variety of soils. On sandy or gravel- 
ly soils, it succeeds admirably, growing two or three feet high. 
On rich, dry upland it grows from five to seven feet high. It 
has an abundance of perennial, long fibrous roots, penetrating 
deeply in the soil, being, therefore, less affected by drought 
or cold, and enabled to yield a large quantity of foliage, win- 
ter and summer. These advantages render it one of the very 
best grasses for the South, both for grazing (being evergreen) 
and for hay, admitting of being cut twice a year. It is prob- 
ably the best winter grass that can be obtained. 

It will make twice as much hay as Timothy, and contain- 
ing a greater quantity of albuminoids and less of heat-pro- 
ducing principles, it is better adapted to the uses of the South- 
ern farmer, while it exhausts the surface soil less, and may be 
grazed indefinitely, except after mowing. To make good hay 
it must be cut when it blooms, and after being cut, must not 
Xli^^^^l^lK^SfflBiS^r get wet by dew or rain, which damages it greatly in quality 

^^ ^SrwSlmnMB^^ and appearance. 

For green soiling, it may be cut four or five times with 
favorable seasons. In from six to ten days after blooming, 
the seeds begin to ripen and fall; the upper ones first. 

It may be sown in March or April, and mowed the same 
season; but for heavier yield it is better to sow in September 
or October. Along the more Southern belt, from the 31 ° par- 
allel southward, it may be sown in November and onward till 
the middle of December- Whenever sown it is one of the 
most certain grasses to have a good catch. Not less than two 
bushels (28 pounds) per acre should be sown. Like Timothy 
Tall Meadow Oat Grass. on inhospitable soils, the roots may sometimes become bul- 

bous. The average annual nutrition yielded by this grass in the Southern belt is prob- 
ably twice as great as in Pennsylvania and other Northern States. 




90 



THE SEED ANNUAI, OF THE 



ITAI/IAN RYE GRASS. 

L oliu ni It a lieu ni . 

A variety similar to the English Rye, except that it grows from two to three feet high 
and has a broader leaf. The leaves are very dark green with somewhat of a metallsc lus- 
ter, and a field well set with this grass undulating under the wind and sun. presents the 
most delightfully beautiful appearance we ever saw in the way of Grasses and green fields. 

This Grass is an excellent forage plant and is much relished by stock, either in a 
a green state or cured as hav. 

It should be sown in our climate from October to January at the rate of 30 pounds to 
the acre. 

BERMUDA GRASS. 
Cyn o do n da ctylo n . 

Almost everybod}' living in this section of the country knows this grass; it is planted 
as a Lawn grass, and nothing will stand the sun better; or will make a pret- 
tier carpet, when kept short, than this grass. It is also very valuable as a pasture and hay 
grass. Six pounds will sow an acre. Should be planted in the spring, but can also be 
sown later. Under the most favorable circumstances it takes from 20 to 25 days to sprout; 
requires damp weather and hot sun; but when once up itgrows very rapidly. 

As a pasture grass, Bermuda cannot be excelled by any other known variety, there 
is certainly no other that maybe considered as valuable. Not only that it will afford even 
during our hot and dry months sufGcient of nourishing fodder for our stock, it will also 
stand our most severe Southern winters, and although dry and yellow looking during that 
time, contains more nutriment than other grasses and will keep stock in fine condition. 

For hay it is unequalled when grown on fertile soil. The plant, even during the driest 
summer, has never been destroyed yet by excessive grazing. 

RESCUE GRASS. 

Ceratochloa aiistralis or Brofuiis Shra- 

deru . 

It is an annual winter grass. It varies 
in the time of starting growth. We have 
Seen it ready for mowing the first of 
October, and furnish frequent cuttings 
till April. Again, it may not start before 
January, nor be ready to cut till Febru- 
ary. This depends upon the moisture 
and depression of temperature. When 
once started, its growth, after the succes- 




Eescue Grass. 



sive citttings or grazings, is very rapid. 
It is tender, very sweet, and stock eat it 
greedily. It makes also a good hay. It 
produces an immense quantity of leaves. 
On loose soil some of it may be pulled 
out by animals grazing it. We have seen 
it bloom as early as November when the 
season has favored it, and no grazing or 
cutting were permitted. Oftener it 
makes little start before January. But 
whether late or early starting, it may be 
grazed or mowed frequently, until April, 
it still will mature seed. It has become 
naturalized in limited portions of Texas, 
Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and 
perhaps other States. A very pretty 
grass in all its stages; and especially so 
when the culms, two or three feet high, 
are gracefully bending the weight of the 
diff'use panicle with its many pedicelled 
flattened spikelets, each an inch or more 
long and with twelve to sixteen flowers. 
We would not, however, advise sowing 
this grass on DOor land with the expecta- 
tion of getting a remunerative return. It 
tillers abundantly under favorable con- 
ditions. 



RICHARD FROTSCHBR SEBD CO., I,td. 



91 



MEADOW FESCUE GRASS. 

Festuca pratensis. 

Meadow Fescue, or as it is generally known Randall grass, is 
in Virginia and further North a perennial, in our Southern clim- 
ate though it may like the most of the grasses be regarded an 
annual as it hardly ever survives our hot and dry summer months. 
It grows equally well in nearly all situations, wet or dry, on hill 
or bottom lands, even on land subject to overflow and matures 
an extraordinary quantity of seed. 

Meadow Fescue is an excellent forage grass, equally as good 
for pasturage green soiling or hay and is much relished by stock. 

The proper time to sow it in the Southern States is from the 
month of September to January and the necessary quantity to 
sow an acre 28 lbs. or two bushels. 




Fescue Grass. 



JOHNSON GRASS. 

Sorghum Halapense. 

Johnson Grass, which has been tried for years by some of our planters, has proven to 
be one of the most difficult to exterminate and for this reason is hardly ever planted 
here. However, it has been praised up by some horticultural writers and is therefore 
sometimes demanded by some of our patrons. We keep a good stock of it on hand during 
the proper season, but do not advocate the planting of it, unless on abandoned land and 
away from any cultivated land. It should never be allowed to produce any seed, as it is 
easily carried about by the wind, and in consequence will spread all over the country. 
One bushel will sow an acre. 

THE FROTSCHER COMPANY'S CRESCENT CITY LAWN 

GRASS MIXTURE. 

There is, as stated before, no permanent Lawn Grass besides the Bermuda and cer- 
tainly none as fine looking during our hot summer season In -winter time it loses its fine 
green appearance and becomes yellow and rusty looking. Our gardeners here are in the 
habit of sowing in the month of October either Knglish Rye, Orchard or Meadow Fescue 
between the Bermuda and in this manner manage to have a fine lawn during the entire 
winter. But as none of the^e varieties alone will make a very even lawn, we have combined 
the best and most suitable varieties together in such proportions as so form one of the 
prettiest and most suitable Lawn Grass mixtures for our climate. The Crescent City Lawn 
Grass Mixture is the only variety that will give entire satisfaction, 

GERMAN MII/LET. 

Setaria Germanica. 

Millet requires good, rich soil, in fact it is folly to sow it in poor land. For forage it 
should be cut when in bloom, as then it contains the most nourishing properties and makes 
the best hay; but if planted for seed to be used as stock food it must be cut when the seed 
begins to turn yellow, then the stems are worthless for hay. Millet is a good forage 
plant and makes a very nutritious and sweet hay which is much relished by stock and 
every farmer should grow it. 

The best time to sow Millet in the South is during the month of April and May. The 
ground should be well plowed and harrowed before sowing and the surface finely pulveriz- 
ed. The necessary quantity to sow an acre is three pecks, but in rich land one bushel 
may be sown as otherwise the stems become too thick. After sowing a heavy field roller 
if one is handy may be passed over the ground and the seed requires no further covering. 
Where no roller is handy, a bundle of brush may be passed over the ground and this will 
cover the seed effectively. 

Under no circumstances should a harrow be used to cover the seed with. 

THE SORGHUM FAMIY. 

As a forage plant for early cutting, to be fed to stock, we think there is nothing that 
will equal the different varieties of Sorghum. In our rich alluvial soil Sorghum will grow 
very luxuriant, producing an immense amount of sweet and nutritious food and will with- 
stand our dry and hot weather better than anything else. 



92 



THB S:^^D ANNUAI, OF THK 



SORGHUM VUI/GAR^. 

Under the botanical name Sorghum vulgare the most of 
the Sorghum varieties, cultivated for stock food are known to 
the botanist, the different species are or ly hybrids. 

The best and most suitable variety for our climate is un- 
doubtedly the Early Amber Sorghum. It is largely planted 
by our planters here and has become quite a favorite as stock 
food with them. All who have tried it speak ver\" highly of 
its nutritive and fattening properties for hogs and other ani- 
mals and of the large yield of grain it produces. 

Next to the Early Amber, the Early Orange may be con- 
sidered the best. In fact the difference between these two 
varieties is so little that is hardly perceptible. 

Sorghum should be sown in the spring as early as possible 
in drills, about three feet apart and three to four quarts of seed 
are the necessary quantity to sow an acre. 




Amber Sorsrham 



DHOURO, or l^GYPTIAN CORN. 

This is a well known cereal. It produces a large quantity of seed, of which fowls and 
animals are fond. Can also be sown broad-cast for soiling, or in drills for fodder and seed. 
If sowed in drills, one peck of seed per acre is ample. If sown broad-cast, one bushel per 
acre. For grain, the stalks should cot be nearer than lo inches in the drill, but if to be 
cut repeatedly for soiling, it is better to sow quite thickly in the hills. Seed should not 
be sown too early, and covered from one -half to one inch. If too much rain in the spring, 
the seed will not come well ; they require more heat than the other Sorghums. 

RTJRAIy BRANCHING SORGHUM or Mll^IyO MAI^]^. 

Produces the seed heads upright in a vertical position, while the others are drooping. 
The seeds are smaller, but will keep longei than the other varieties. The stalk grows very 
large and produces a good many large leaves. It suckers and tillers more and more the 
oftener it is cut. It exceeds greatly in yield of green fodder any of the familiar fodder 
plants, except the ''Teosinte." It should be planted exclusively in the drills four feet 
apart, 18 to 20 inches in the drills. 

KAFFIR CORN. 

Sorghum Kaffrorum. 

A variety of Sorghum non-saccharine, and distinctly differing in habit of growth and 
other characteristics from all others of that class. The plant is low, stocks perfect!}' erect, 
the foliage is wide, alternating closely on either side of the stalks. 

It does not stool from the root, but branches from the top joints, producing from two 
to four heads of grain from each stalk. The heads are long, narrow and perfectly erect, 
well j511ed with white grain, which at maturity is slightly flecked with red or reddish 
brown spots. Weight, 60 lbs. per bushel. 

The average height of growth on good strong land, 5^ to 6 feet; on thin land. 4)2 to 
5 feet. The stalk is stout, never blown about by winds, never tangles, and is always man- 
ageable, easily handled. A boy can gather the grain heads or the fodder. The seed 
heads grow from 10 to 12 inches in length, and product of grain on good land easily 
reaches 50 to 60 bushels per acre. 

It has the quality common to man)- Sorghums of resisting drought. 

The whole stalk, as well as the blades, cures into excellent fodder, and in all stages of 
its growth is available for green feed, cattle, mules and hones being equally fond of it, 
audits quality is not surpassed by anj^ other known variety. If cut down to the ground 
two or more shoots spring from the root, and the growth is thus maintained until checked 
by frost. 

The Kaffir Corn may be planted in the latter part of March, or early in April. It 
bears earlier planting than other Millets or Sorghums. It should be put in rows not over 



RICHARD FROTSCHBR SEED CO , I/td. 



93 



I 



I 



three feet apart, even on the best land, and it bears thicker planting than any other 
variety of Sorghum; should be massed in the drill on good land, for either green or forage 
purposes. 

BROOM CORN. 

Can be planted the same as corn; put the hills closer together in the row. Six quarts 
will plant an acre. 

TBOSINTE. 

Reana or Euchloena luxurians. 

One of the most luxuriant growing forage plants introduced, of South American 
origin, and one which in point of growth and amount of nourishing foliage excels any 
other forage plant known. 

In good soil and with proper cultivation, it will throw up from 15 to 30 stalks on one 
plant to a height of from 10 to 12 feet, densely covered with foliage. 

In order to be successful with Teosinte, it should be sown in drills aj early as the be- 
ginning of March as it takes generally from 14 to 20 days before the seed germinates. In 
this manner a good stand may be had at the beginning of April. 

For green fodder. Teosinte may be cut three or four times during the season, but then 
it should not be allowed to grow any taller than three or four feet. 

In cutting, it is advisable to cut it clean to the ground as this will insure a heavier 
growth than when cut 100 high. Teosinte in its own native country is a perennial, but 
with us it is invariably killed during winter and may, therefore, be considered an annual. 

The seed, we have on hand, is imported, as in our climate it will produce none. 




Teosinte. 



94 TH^ S^^Jy ANNUAlv OF THE 



ROOTS FOR STOCK FOOD. 

It is astonishing that our planters have paid so little attention to the growing of winter 
food for their stock. It is true, during the entire winter, more or less food for stock may 
be found out of doors: but if we consider that nothing is gained by pasturing stock during 
winter, we must come to the conclusion that it would pay to stable and feed it. 

Let us look upon this thing in the right way; we would gain first in this manner in 
the spring, whatever stock we would want to dispose of, would be in a splendid condition, 
would bring a good price, and would not be half starved, as has always been the case; we 
would also gain in another way ; the very article which is so often needed, we mean stable 
manure, is lost to us if our stock is allowed to wander at large in search of food. Cows and 
horses also will often travel a considerable distance in search of shelter and food, which 
they generally find in cane breaks, or the woods near by. How many heads are annually 
lost either by neglect or starvation, or killed by railroads and otherwise. 

All this could be avoided if we feed and stable our stock during the winter. A few 
acres of land planted in Mangel Wurzels or Sugar Beets would give us in connection with 
hay grown on our farms sufficient stock food for the entire winter. 

If sown in September in drills, thinned out to a proper stand, those pulled out maybe 
transplanted, and if cultivated like Blood Beets, both will grow to a large size; the lower 
leaves may be taken off from time to time, and are an excellent green food for stock. 

When severe cold weather sets in. and there should be danger of the beets freezing, 
which by the way happens very seldom, they may be taken up and brought under shelter. 

Besides Mangel and Sugar Beets, Long Orange and other long variet es of Carrots are 
excellent for stock. 



:o: 



FLOWER SEEDS 



So much has been written already on the cultivation of Flowers, and man}' a book 
published on that subject, that, were it not necessary for the guidance of the inexperi- 
enced, we would hardly say much. But as it often falls to the seedsman's lot to be unnec- 
essarily accused of selling seeds which fail to grow or varieties which do not come up to 
expectations, it is therefore necessary to give a few hints on the sowing and subsequent 
culture of Flowers. 

Flower seeds are not like Vegetable seeds, they are finer and more delicate, require a 
great deal of attention and care, and above all a fine pulverized soil. 

In order to be successful with Flower seeds the proper situation of the seed-bed has 
first to be taken into consideration; an eastern exposure would certainly be the most suita- 
ble for that purpose. The soil should be well pulverized and light enough so as not to 
bake after a rain. The finer and more delicate seeds should be sown in shallow boxes or 
seed pans, which may be placed on a low shelf having an eastern exposure. Flower seeds 
if sown by inexperienced hands are generally covered too deep^ and any failure to come up 
must be attributed to this. The rule is, to cover fine seeds not more than twice their thick- 
ness. 

Another cause of frequent failures is irregular watering; sometimes the seed-beds or 
boxes are over-watered, while at other times again they are allowed to become too dry. 
Nothing is more disastrous than when seeds are in the act of germinating, and are suffer- 
ing for moisture, the little radicles when forming are easily destroyed bv the rays of the 
sun, and as a matter of course the seeds cannot come up. We would therefore advise to 
keep the seed-beds equally moist, not too wet, until the young plants are up and large 
enough to be transplanted. 

Now a few words yet on the time of sowing. 

Flower seeds are oftener sown out of time than at the proper season, simply because 
most ever3^body thinks of sowing when the same [plants are in full bloom, and we can 
safely assert that more Pansy seed is called for in January and February than in Septem- 
ber and October, and more Hyacinth and Narcissus bulbs in February than at the proper 
planting season. The seeds sown out of time will produce poor plants, and that if they 
bloom at all the flowers will be imperfect and small is needless to sa}'. 

By setting out the )^oung seedlings consideration should be taken of the height and 
combination of colors in order to make a pretty effect. Our list of Flower seeds is not a 

Try the Frotseher Company's Superb Sweet Peae. 



RICHARD FROTSCHBR SE:E;D CO., I/td. 



95 



very large one, but it contains all which can successful!}' be grown in our climate, and no 
new variety will be listed unless properly tried and found to suit our climate. All Flower 
seeds are carefully put up in packages at 5c and loc each, or twenty for one dollar, except 
a few rare or costly kinds, where the price is noted, and all packages are nxaWed. free of 
postage to the purchaser. Where more than one color is contained in' any variety, as for 
instance, in Asters. Zinnias, Phlox, Verbenas, etc., we import them in mixed colors so as 
to give to our patrons a variety of colors in one package and not to compel them to buy a 
half dozen in order to get an assortment. 



Althea Rosea. Hollyhock. This flower 
has been much improved of late years, and 
is very easily cultivated. Can be sown from 
October tillFebruary. Very hardy; from 
four to six feet high. 




Althea Rosea. 

Alyssum Maritimum. Sweet Alys- 
sum. Very free flowering plants, about six 
inches high, with white flowers; very fra- 
grant. Sow from October till April. 



Adonis autumnalis. Flos Adonis or 
Pheasant's Eye. Showy crimson flower, of 
long duration. One foot high, Sow from 
November till January. 




Trufant's Taeony Flowered Aster. 

Antirhinum majus. Snapdragon. 
Choice mixed. Showy plant of various 
colors. About two feet high. Should be 
sown early, if perfect flowers are desired. 
Sow from October till March. 




German Quilled Aster. 

Aster. Queen Margaret. German Quilled. 
Perfect double quilled flower, of all shades, 
from white to dark purple and crimson. 
One and a half feet high. 




Adonis autnmnalis . 

j Aster. Trufant's Paeony-Flowered Per- 
fection. Large double pseony-shaped flow- 
ers, oi fine mixed colors; one of the best 
varieties. Two feet high; sow from Decem- 



Oup Sweet Peas in mixture 



are of the Finest strain 
Surpassed. 



and cannot be 



96 



THE s:ekd annual of the 



ber till March . Asters should be sown in a 
box or in pots, and kept in a green-house, or 
near a window; when large enough, trans- 
plant into the border. Take a shovel of 
compost and mis with the ground before 
planting. Put three to four plants together 
and they will show better. They can be 
cultivated in po'^s. 

Some of our patrons are under the im- 
presMon that the small border plant. Al- 
THERNAXTHERA, which is erroneously 
called Araaranthus. is the same as the 
Amaranthus bicolor. deseribed on this page, 
and call for the seed of it. oni}' to get disap- 
pointed. The Amaranthus bicolor is but an 
annual and grows to a height of two feet, 
consequently it is not a border plant and 
will not, like Althernanthera, bear clipping 
or trimming. 




Amaranthus Tricolor. 

Amaranthus caudatus. Love Lies 
-Bleeding. Lon.^ red racemes with blood 
red flowers. Very graceful; three feet high. 
Sow from March to Mav. 




Amaranthus Salicifolius, Fountain Plant. 



Amaranthus tricolor. Three-colored 
Amaranth. Very showy; cultivated on ac- 
count of its leaves, which are green, yellow 
and red. Two to three feet high. Sow 
from INIarch to June. 

Amaranthus bicolor. Two-colored 
Amaranth. Crimson and green variegated 



foliage; good for massing. 



Two feet high. 




Araaranlhus Candatus. 



Fountain 



foliage, very graceful. 



Amaranthus Salicifolius. 

Plant. Rich colored 

Five to six feet high. Sow from February 

till June. 

Aquilegfia. Columbine. A showy and 
beautiful flower of different colors; two feet 
high. Sow from October till ]\Iarch. 
Should be sown early if flowers are wished; 
if sown late will not bloom till next season. 




Aqnilegia, or Columbine 



Oup Flower Seeds are imported from one of the best growers In 

Germany. 



RICHARD FROTSCHER SEED CO., Ltd. 



97 






Balsamina Camelia- Flowered. 



Double Daisy. 



Calendula Officinalis. 



Balsamina. Improved Camelia- 
flowered. Very rouble and beautiful colors. 
The strain which we offer of this variety is 
very fine; but to have them perfect, they 
should not be sown too soon. In rich 
ground and during dry weather they require 
plenty of water. 

Balsamina camelia flora alba. Pure 
white flowers, used for bouquets, about two 
feet high. Sow from February till August. 

Bellis Perennis. Daisy. Finest double 
mixed variety; four inches high. From 
October till January. 

Browallia elata major. A free bloom- 
ing plant of about 12 inches in height, with 
very showy dark blue flowers. If sown in 
March it will flower all summer, but can 
also be sown in November petted and kept 
under glass, where it will begin to bloom in 
the latter part of December and continue all 
winter. 

Begonia tuberosa. A very thankful 
green-house plant with tuberous roots and 
large showy pink, white or red flowers. It 
is of easy culture and can be kept out of 
doors in a half shad}- place after the 15th of 
April. Sow from October till March in 
flower pots. Price, per packet, 25 cents. 

Begfonia Rex. A beautiful and showy 
green -house foliaj^e plant of easy culture. 
Will do well out of doors during summer 
months, but requires a shady place. Sow 
like above. Price, per packet, 25 cents. 

Cacalia coccinea. Scarlet Tassel 
Flower. A profuse flowering plant, with 
tasael-shaped flowers in cluster; one and a 
half feet. Sow February till May. 

Calendula officinalis. Pot Marigold. 
A plant which, properly speaking, belongs 
to the aromatic herbs, but sometimes culti- 



vated for the flowers, which vary in diff'erent 
shades of 57e!low; one and a half feet high. 
From January till April. 

Celosia cristata. Dwarf Cock's comb. 
Well known class of flowers which are very 
ornamental, producing large heads ofcrim- 




Cheiranthus Cheiri. 
son and yellow flowers; one to two feet high. 
Sow from February till August. 

Campanula Speculum. Bell-Flower, 
or Venus' Looking Glass. Free flowering 
plants of diff'erent colors, from white to 
dark blue; one foot high. Sow December 
till March. 



Our patrons will doubtless be pleased to know that notwithstanding- 
the hard times, our business is steadily increasing. 



ds 



THE s:eed annual of thk 




Cyclamen 
CheiTantlius Cheiri. Wall Flower. 
This flower is highly esteemed in some ; 
parts of Europe, but does not grow very 
perfectly here, and seldom produces the 
large spikes of double flowers which are very ., 
fragrant. Two feet high. November till 
March. 

Cineraria hybrida. A beautiful green- 
house plant. Seed should be sown in Oc- 
tober or November, and they will flower in 
spring. Per package, 25 cents. 



Persicum, 

Cineraria Maritima. A handsome 

border plant, known here as Dusty Miller^ 
which is cultivated on account of its silvery 
white leaves. Stands our summer well. 

Cyclamen persicum. Alpine Violet. 
A green-house plant with tuberous or rather 
bulbous roots, blooming abundantly, being 
possessed of very ornamental foliage and of 
easy culture, it should not be missing in any 
collection of green-house plants. Sow in 
August and September in pots, transplant in 








^f^ 



Centaurea Cvanus. 



Celosia Cristata. 



Centaurea Suavolens. 



All Flower Seeds are of the best quality and true to name. 



RICHARD FROTSCHER SKBD CO., Ltd. 



99 



small pots when large enough, and keep 
either in green-house or a room near the 
window, and give plenty of light and air. 
Keep Bulbs dry during summer. Price, per 
packet, 25 cents. 

Centaurea cyaiius. Bottle Pink. A 
liardy annual of easy culture, of various 
colors; two feet high. 

Centaurea suavolens. Yellow, Sweet 
Sultan. December to April. 

Coleus. A well-known and beautiful 
bedding plant which can be easily propagated 
by seeds and produce different shades of 
colored plants, t^ow from March to May. 

Correopsis. (Calleopsis. ) Bright Eye 
Daisy. Handsome free blooming plants, of 
the easiest culture, 2 to 3 feet high, with 
vellow and brown daisy-like flowers. De- 
cember to March. 




Dianthus Barbatus. 

Chrysanthemum tricolor (carinatum .) 
Summer Chrysanthemum. Showy summer 
bloomers of different colors, 12 to 15 inches 
high. If grouped together they have a 
pleasing effect. Sow in March and April. 

Cosmos bipinnata hybrida. A very 
showy annual similar in shape to the Bright 





Dianthus Cbinensis, Double. 



Cacalia Coccinea. 
Eye Daisy or Correopsis, but taller and more 
brilliant in color. Being a native of Mexico 
it is well adapted to our climate and will 
bloom here almost the entire summer, but 
principally in the fall and early winter. 

There are many different varieties of Cos- 
mos or as some Botanists have it Cosraeas, 
but the principal and most suitable for our 
climate is Cosmos bipinnata in different 
shades and varieties. Of late this species of 
plants, although not a novelty, has become 
quite a favorite among the most of our 
flower loving-ladies, and therefore we have 
added it to cur already large collection of 
Flower seed. Price, per packet, 10 cents. 

Dianthus Barbatus. Sweet William. 
A well- known plant, which has been much 
improved of late years. Their beautiful 
colors make them very show3^ Should be 
sown early, otherwise they will not flower 
the first spring; one and a half feet high. 
October till April. 

Dianthus Chinensis- Chinese Pink. 
A beautiful class of annualsof various colors, 
which flower very profusely in early spring 
and summer; one foot high. From October 
to April. 

Dianthus Heddewiggii. Japan Pink. 
This is the most showy of any of the annual 
pinks. The flowers are very large and of 
brilliant colors; one foot high. Sow from 
October till April. 

Dianthus plumaris- Border Pink. A 
fragrant pink used for edging. The flowers 
are tinged, generally pink or white with a 
dark eye. Does not flower the first year; 
two feet high. Sow from January till April. 

Dianthus caryophyllus. Carnation 
Pink. This is a well-known and highly 
esteemed class of flowers. They are double, 
of different colors, and very fragrant; can 
be sown either in fall or spring; should be 



Our Mixed Cosmos are of the Finest Quality. 



100 



THE SEED ANNUAI, OF THE 




Dianthiis Heddewiggii. 

shaded during midsummer and protected 
from hard raius: three to four feet high. 
November till April. 

Dianthus Picotee. Finest hybrids. 
Stage floNvers saved from a collection of over 
500 named varieties: per package. 50 cents. 

Dianthus caryophylitis, Marg-aritae 
robustus, fl. pi. Semi-high double Mar- 
garet Carnations. This beautiful pink ori- 
ginated in Italy. It is of a dwarfish habit, 
grows from 12 to 15 inches high; the stalks 
are exceedingly strong, and therefore need 
no support. The flowers are much varie- 




gated, occasionally producing yellow ones. 
What makes this variety remarkable, is. 
that it flowers after four months from the 
time of sowing the seed, and produces about 
■■^o per cent, of double flowers, unlike other 
Carnations, which are biennial and only 
bloom the second vear. 








ri^f^Wri^ 



ft 







Early Dwarf Double C arnation Pink. 

Dianthus pumila. Early dwarf iower- 
ing Carnation. If sown early, this variety 
will flower the first season. They are quite 
dwarfish and flower very profuselv". No- 
vember till April. 

Delphinium Imperialis, fl. pi. Im- 
perial flowering Larkspur. Ver}* handsome 
variety of symmetrical form. Mixed colors; 
bright red. dark blue and red striped; ij 
feet high. 




Dianthus Picotee. 



Dianthus Caryophyllus.- 

Delphinium ajacis. Rocket Larkspur. 
Mixed colors; very showy; two and a half 
feet. 

Delphinium Chinensis. Dwarf China 
Larkspur. Mixed colors: very pretty; one 
foot high. November till April. 



Marguerite Carnation Pinks are the best for our Climate. 



RICHARD FR0TSCH:ER SE^D CO., I/td. 



101 



Note.— None of the Delphiniums or 
Larkspurs transplant well, and are 
better sown at once where they are 
intended to remain. 

Dahlia. Large flowering Dah- 
lia. Seed sown in the spring will 
flower by June. Very pretty col- 
ors are obtained ftom seed, the 
semi- doable or single ones can be 
pulled up as they bloom ; but those 
seeds which are saved from fine 
double varieties will produce a 
good percentage of double flowers. 
Febauary till June. 

Bschscholtsjia Californica. 
California Poppy. A very free 
flowering plant, good for masses. 
Does not transplant well. One 
foot high. December till April. 

Gaillardia bicolor. Two- 
colored Gaillardia. Very showy 
plants which continue to flower 
for a long time. Flowers red, 
bordered with orange 3'ellow. One 
and a half feet high. January till 
April. 

Gottiphrena alba and pur- 
purea. White and Crimson 
Bachelor Button or Globe Ama- 
ranth. Well known variety of 
flowers; very early and free flow- 
ering; continue to flower for a 
long time. Two feet high. From 
February till August. 

Geranium i^onale. Zonale Geranium, 
Seed saved from lar,!:>e flowering varieties of 
different colors; should be sown in seed 
pans, and when large enough transplanted 
into pots, where they can be left, or trans- 
planted in spring into the open ground. 

Geranium pelargonium. Large flow- 
ering Pelargonium. Spotted varieties, 25 
cents per package. 




Heliotropium. Mixed varieties with 
dark and light shaded flower. A well- 
known plant, esteemed for the fragrance of 
its flowers, which are produced during the 
whole summer in great profusion. This 
plant is generally propagated by cutting, 
but can also be raised from seed. Should 
be sown in a hot-bed if sown early. 




Delphinium Chinensis. 



Gailardia Bicolor. 



Purple Globe Amaranth. 



Proper care and Sowing* at the right time are essential in order to be 

successful with Flowers. 



102 



th:e sebd annual of the 



Helianthus fl. pi. Double Flowering 
Sunflower. A well known plant, with 
show}' yellow flowers, the double is often 
cultivated in the flower garden. The single 
varieties are cultivated mostly for the seed. 
They are said to be anti-maJarious. Four 
feet high. February till Ma v. 

Helichrysum monatrosum album. 

White Everlasting Flower. Very showy 
double flowers. One and a half feet high, 

Helickrysum monstrosum rubrum. 

Red Everlasting Flower. Very ornamental. 
One and a half feet high. December till 
April. Does not transplant well. 

Iberis amara. White Candytuft. A 
well known plant raised a good deal by 
florists for bouquets. Can be sown at differ- 
ent times to have a succession of flowers. 
One foot high. 

Iberis umbelata rosea. Purple Candy- 
tuft. One foot. October till April. 

Impatiens sultani. This handsome 
single variety of the well-known Balsam or 
Lady Slipper, is surely a good acquisition 
our rich collection of summer bloomers. Of 
half high growth, being literally covered 
with pale scarlet flowers during the summer 
months, it cannot be surpassed for bed. iing 
out. Price, per packet, 25 cents. Sow from 
February to April. 

I/inum g-randMorum rubrum. Scar- 
let Flax. A very prett)- plant for masses or 
borders, with bright scarlet flowers, dark 
in the centre. One foot. January till April. 





Heliotropium. 

I/obelia erinus. Lobelia. A very 
graceful plant with white and blue flowers, 
well adapted to hanging baskets or borders. 
Half foot October till March. 

I/ychnis chalcedonica. Lychnis. 
Fine plants with scarlet, white and rose 
colored flowers. Two feet. December till 
April. 



Geranium Zonale. 




Helichrysum MoBstrosum Album. 

Mathiola annua. Ten weeks stocks. 
This is one of the finest annuals in cultiva- 
tion. Large flowers of all colors, from 
white to dark blue or crimson. Should be 
sown in pots or pans, and when large 
enough transplanted into rich soil. One 
and a quarter feet. October till March. 



As a bedding Plant Impatiens Sultani cannot be surpassed. 



RICHARD FR0TSCH:ER Sl^nD CO., I/td. 



103 




Impatiens Sultani. 

Netnopliila maculata. Large white 
flowers, spotted with violet. One foot high. 
December till April. 



Mesembryanthemum crystallinum. 

Ice plant. Neat plant with icy looking- foli- 
age. It is of spreading habit. Good for 
baskets or beds. One foot. February till 
March. 

Mimulus tigrinus. Monkey flower. 
Showy flowers of yellow and brown. Should 
be sown in a shady place. Does not trans- 
plant well. Half foot. December till 
March. 

Mimosa pudica. Sensitive Plant. A 
curious and interesting plant which folds up 
its leaves when touched. One foot. Febru- 
ary till June. 

Mirabilis jalapa. Marvel of Peru. A 
well-known plant of easy culture; produc- 
ing flowers of various colors. It forms a root 
which can be preserved from one year to an- 
other. February till June. Three feet. 

Matricaria capensis. Double Matri- 
caria. White double flowers, resembling the 
Daisy, but smaller, are fine for bouquets; 
blooms nearly the whole summer. Two feet. 
December till March. 

Myosotis palustris. Forget-me-not. 
A fine little plant, with small, blue, star- 
like flowers. Should have a moist, shady 
situation. Does not succeed so well here as 
in Europe, of which it is a native. Half 
foot high. December till March. 

Nemopliila Insignis. Blue Grove 
Love. Plants of easy culture, very pretty 
and profuse bloomers. Bright blue with 
white centre. One foot high. 

Nigella damascena. Love in a Mist. 
Plants of easy culture, with light blue 
flowers. Does not transplant well. One foot 
high. December till April. 




v?i?^'5©? 




Lobelia Erinus. 



LycliBis Chalcedonica. 



Nierembergia gracilis. Nierember- 
gia. Nice plants with delicate foliage, and 
white flowers tinted with lilac. One foot 
November till April. 



high 



CEnothera I/amarckiana. Evening 
Primrose. Showy, large yellow flowers. 
November till April. 



Two feet high. 



Our mixed Flower Seeds are composed of the best selected varieties. 



]04 



THE se:ed annuai, of the 



Papaver Somniferum. Double flow- 
ering Poppy. Of different colors; very 
showy. 

Papaver ranunculus Flowered. 

Double fringed flowers, very showy. Cannot 
be transplanted. Two feet high. October 
till March. 




Mathiola Annua. 

Petunia hybrida. Petunia. Splendid 
mixed hybrid varieties. A very decorative 
plant of var.ous colors, well known to al- 
most every lover of flowers. Plants are of 
spreading habit; about one foot high. Jan- 
uary till May. 





Ice Plant. 

PMox Drummondii. Drummond Phlox. 
One of the best and most popular annualsin 
cultivation. Their various colors and length 
of flowering, with easy culture, make them 
favorites with every one. All fine colors 
mixed; one foot high. December till April. 

Phlox Drummondii grandiflora, 
Stellata Splendens. This is admitted to 
be the richest colored and most effective of 
all large flowered Phloxes. It combines all 
the good qualities of the Splendens, with 



Geranium Pelarsronium. 



M^^' 




Double Matricaria. 

the addition of a clearly defined, pure 
white star, which contrasts strikingly with 
the vivid crimson of the flowers. 



Petunias are excellent bedding" Plants, and will with little cape bloom 

almost the entire summer. 



RICHARD FROTSCHBR SEBD CO., I,td. 



105 



Phox Drummondii grandiflora alba. 

Pure white, some with purple rvr violet eye. 
Portulaca. A small plant of great beau- 
ty, and of the easiest culture. Does best in 
a well exposed situation, where it hasplen- 
ty of sun. The flowers are of various colors, 
from white to bright scarlet and crimson. 
The plant is good for edging vases or pots; 
or where large plants are kept in tubs, the 
surface can be filled with this neat little 
genus of plants. Half foot high. February 
till August. 



^s:r^-^ 




Blue Grove Love, 

Portulaca grandiflora, fl. pi. Double 
Portujaca. The same variety of colors with 
semi-double and double flowers; half foot 
high. February till August. 

Primula veris. Cowslip. An herbace- 
ous plant of various colors, highly esteemed 
in Europe; half foot high, December till 
April. 




Nigelia Damascena. 

Primula Chinensis. Chinese Prim- 
rose. A green-house plant which flowers 
profusely and continues to bloom for a long 



time; should be sown early to insure the 
plant flowering well. Difi'erent colors mixed, 
per package, 25 cents. One and a half feet 
October till February, 



high. 




(Enothera Lamarcklana. 

Pyrethrum aurem. Golden Feather. 
The flowers resemble Asters. It has bright 
yellow leaves which make it very showy as 
a border if massed with plants such as 
Coleus, etc. 

Reseda odorata grandiflora. Sweet 
Mignonette. A fragrant plant with large 




Papaver Ranunculus Flowered. 

spikes of yellowish red flowers and a favor- 
ite with everybody. Fifteen inches high. 
December till April. 

Saponaria calabrica. Soapwort. A 
very free flowering annual, of easy culture, 
resembling somewhat in leaves the Sweet 



Oup strain of Phlox is excellent, the most brilliant colors are repre- 
sented. 



106 



THE SEED ANNUAI, OF THE 



%f#* 





De- 



Petunia Hybricla, 
William. One and a half feet high. 
ce:iiber till April. 

Salvia Splendens. Scarlet Salvia or 
Red Fioweriny Sage. A pot or greeu-house 
plant, but which can be grown as an an- 
nual, as it flowers freely" from seed the first 
vear. Two to three feet high. Februarv 
till April. 



Petnnia Hybrida Double, 
Scabiosa nana. Dwarf Mourning Bride. 
Plants of double flowers of various colors- 
One foot hiiih. December till April. 

Sil=ne Ameria. Lobel's Catchfly. A 
free blooming plant of easy culture flowers 
almost anywhere: red and while. One and 
a half feet high. 

Tagfetcs erecta. African or Tall-grow- 
ing Marigold. Very showy annuals for bor- 




Phlox Drummondii Grand'iiora. 



Nothing looks prettier in Summer time than a bed of Portulacas. 



RICHARD FROTSCHER SEED CO., I.td. 



107 



ders. with bright yellow flowers 
growing upright. Two and a half 
feet high. 

Tagetes Patula. French or 
Dwarf Marigold. A very comp- 
act dwarf growingvariety, covered 
with yellow and brown flowers. 
One and a half feet high. Janu- 
ary till April. 

Torenia Fournieri. A plant 
from Mexico of recent introduc- 
tion, but which has become ver}' 
popular in a short time. It s'"ands 
the heat well, is well adapted to 
pot culture and makes one of the 
most valuable bedding plants we 
have. The flowers are of a sky 
blue color, with three spots of 
dark blue. The seeds are very 
fine and take a good while to ger- 
minate. It transplants very easy. 

Verbena hybrida. Hybridized 




Phlox Drummondii Grandiflora Stellata Splendens. 
Ver- Verbena Candidissima. White Ver- 



bena. A well known and favorite flower for I bena. Pure white flowers of more or less 



borders. Their long flowering and great 
diversity of color make them valuable for 
every garden however small. x\ll colors 
mixed. One and a half feet high. January 
till April. 

Verbena Striped Italian. These are 
beautiful striped kinds of all colors with 
large e3'es. 



fragrance. One and a half feet high. Jan- 
uary till April. 

Vinca rosea and alba. Red and White 
periwinkle. Plants of shining foliage, with 
while and dark rose colored flowers, which 
are produced the whole summer and au- 
tumn. Two feet high. February till April. 




Portulaca. 



Eeseda Odorata. 



Primula Veris. 



Half loot high. 



Viola odorata. Sweet Violet. Well 
known edging plant, which generally is 
propagated by dividing the plants; but can 
also be raised from seed. 
Sow from January till March, 

Viola tricolor maxima. Large flower- 
ing English Pansy. This is one of the finest 
little plants in cultivation for pots or the 
open ground. They are of endless colors 



and markings. When planted in the gar- 
den, they will show better if planted in 
masses, and a little elevated above the level 
of the garden. Half foot high. October till 

March. 

Bugnot's Improved blotched Pansy. 

Thii new variety is certamlv the hand- 
somest ot all the Pansies and like the Odiers 
are five blotched and generally yellow or 



OuF Flower Seeds are imported from the best growers in Europe. 



lOS 



Tnn SE^BD ANNUAIv OF THE? 



white edged. The flowers are of the most 
perfect form and beautiful coloring. This 
variet}' is one of the best and forms a 
fine acquisition to our already large collec- 
tion. Price, per packet, 25c. 

I/argfe Trimardeau Pansy. This is 
the largest variety in cultivation; the flow- 
ers are well formed, generally three-spotted ; 
quite distinct; the plants grow compact. 
Assorted colors for borders or ribbon beds. 

Non Plus Ultra. Benary's Elite Pansy. 
This new variety from Germany is the finest 
of all Pansies. Endowed; with well -formed 
flowers in endless colors and shades; they 
form a valuable acquisition to our many 
varieties in cultivation, and should not be 
missing.in any garden. 

Cassier's Improved Pansy. A beau- 
tiful variety with large flowers of most per- 
fect form, exquisite coloring and very com- 
pact growth. The flowers are generally 
five-spotted, but more distinctly marked 
than the Trimardeau. 

Zinnia elegans, fl. pi. Double Zinnia. 
Plants of very easy culture, flowering very 
profusely through the whole summer and 




Scabiosa Xana, 





DoubJe Po-rtulaca. 



Tagetes Patnla. 




Vinca Rosea and Alba. 



Hj'bridized Verbena. 



Of all winter and spring" Flowering Plants Pansies are the handsomest 
and most thankful. Our collection is the best assorted. 

Give it a trial. 



RICHARD FROTSCHER SEED CO., I.td. 



109 



fall; producing double flowers of all colors, 
almost as lar<je as the flower of a Dahlia. 
Three feet high. Fel ruary till^August. 




Striped Italian Verbena. 



Choicest Large English Pansy 




Muiuuiiium**^ 

Large Triinardeau Pausy. 




Tagetes Erecta, 



Proper care and Sowing' at the right time are essential in order to be 

successful with Flowers. 



no 



THB SEBD ANNUAI, OF TH!^ 



large flowers of great 



Zitmisi elegans pumila, fl. pi. Dwarf 
Double Mixed. A new dwarf selection 
especially desirable. The compact, bushy 
plants rarely grow over two feet high, and 
are covered with 
beauty. 

^iiinia elegans grandiflora robusta 
plenissima. A new variety recently in- 
troduced here from Germany. The plants 
of this new class of showy and attractive 
annuals are of ver}- robust growth and p:o- 
duce very large and extremely double 
flowers, measuring from 4 to 5 inches in 
diameter. The seeds we offer for sale come 
direct from the originator, and contain 



about eight beautiful different colors, mostly 
very bright. 

Planted in the centre of a large bed and 
bordered off first with Zinnia elegans and 
towards the edge of the bed with Zinnia 
elegans pumila, they are very effective and 
on account of the immense quantity of 
flowers the}' produce of great value. 

Zinnia elegans flore alba pleno. 
Double snow white Zinnia. Similar to 
Ziriuia elegans in height and quanlitv of 
flowers which are pure white. Excellent 
for bouquets and other floral work. Should 
be sown from March to August. 




Zinnia Elegans, Gruuuinora Eobusta Plenissiina. 



Oup patrons will doubtless be pleased to know that notwithstanding" 
the hard times, our business is steadily increasing*. 



RICHARD FROTSCHBR SEED CO., I^td. 



Ill 




CLIMBING PLANTS. 



I 



Antigonum I/Cptopus. Rosa Mon- 
tana. One of the finest perennial climbers 
of rapid growth with long racemes of beau- 
tiful deep pink flowers. Being a native of 
Mexico, it is well adapted to our climate 
and will stand our most severe winters with- 
out any further protection than perhaps a 
slight cover of moss or straw. Sow in 
February or March in flower pots, and 
transplant into the open ground in May. 
Will flower freel}' the first year. Without 
any doubt the finest climber for this section. 

Aristolochia elegans. A new variety of 
the well ^x\ow XV ''^ Dutchman'' s pipe y (which 
however will not grow here); of vigorous 
growth and quite hardy in our climaie. It 
is a profuse bloomer, bearing large flowers 
of a rich purple color with irregular 
branched markings of creamy white and 
golden yellow center with rich velvety 
purple. This plant is one of the most thank- 
ful of all climbers, blooming when quite 
young and continuing to do so the whole 
summer. Will stand our winter without 
protection. Sow in January and February 
in flowerpots and trarsplancin open ground 
when large enough. 

Benincasa cerifera. Wax Gourd. A 
strong growing vine with long shaped, dark 
crimson fruit, which looks very ornamental- 
It is used for preserves. 

Cardiospermutti. Balloon vine A quick 
growing climber, the seeds of which are in 



a pod, shaped like a miniature balloon, 
therefore the name. 

Cucurbita. Ornamental Gourd. Mixed 
varieties or Ornamental Gourds of different 
shapes and sizes. February till May. 

Cucurbita I^agenaria dulcis. Sweet 
Gourd. A strong growing vine of which the 
young fruits are used like squash. Febru- 
ary till April. 

Cobsea Scandens. Climbing Cobaea. 
Large purple bell-shaped flowers. Should 
be sown in a hot- bed and not kept too 
moist. Place the seed edgewise in the 
ground. Twenty feet high, January till 
April. 

Convolvulus major. Morning Glory. 
Well known vine with various handsomely 
colored flowers of easy culture. Grows almost 
an v where. Ten feet high. February till 
July. 

Dolichos I/ablab. Hyacinth Beans. 
Free growing plant, with purple and white 
flowers. March till April. 

Ipomsea Quamoclit rosea. Red Cy- 
press Vine. Very beautiful, delicate foliage 
of rapid growth, with scarlet star-shaped 
flowers. 

Ipomsea Quamoclit alba. White Cy- 
press Vine. The same as the Red variety. 

Ipomsea Noctiflora. Large Flower- 
ing Evening Glory. A vine of rapid growth, 
with beautiful white flowers which r^pen in 



As all Flowering" plants are frequently subject to the ravag-es of in- 
sects, we would advise to use Tobacco Dust as an 
infallible remedy, 



112 



THE SEED ANNUAL OF THE 




Twenty feet liigh. 



the evening 

till June. 

This is the Moon Flower advertised in 

Northern Catalogues as a novelt}', notwith- 
standing the fact that it has been known 
here for the past century. 



Aristolochia Elegans. 
Februarv 




Mamordica Balsamitia. Balsam 
Apple. A climbing plant of very rapid 
growth, producing Cucumber-like fruits, 
with warts on them. They are believed to 
contain some medicinal virtues. Generally 
put up in jars with alcohol and used as a 
dressing for cuts, bruises, etc. 



^^e::.^fe:=> 



Balloon Vine. 

Maurandia Barclayana. Mixed 

Maurandia. A slender growing ^'ine of rapid 
growth. Rose purple and white colors 
mixed. Ten feet high. February till April. 




Climbing Cob^ea. 
Mina Lobata. A showy plant from 
Mexico of the well-known Ipomsea family 
with beautiful spikes or racemes of yel- 
lowish white flowers. 



One of the handsomest and hardiest Vines for our climate is the 
Aristolochia Elegrans. No place, no mattor how small, 
should be without it. 



RICHARD FROTSCHBR S]^BD CO., I,td. 



1V3 



The buds are at first of a bright red, but 
soon change to orange yellow, and whet in 
full bloom to a yellowish white, forming a 
fine contrast wi;h the dense and luxuriant 
foliage. This plant does well in sunny sit- 
uations and can not be surpassed for cover- 
ing arbors. 




Morning Glory. 

I/athyrus odoratus. Sweet Peas. Of 
this beautiful climbing plant we have, by 
special arrangement with one of the best 
growers, been enabled to secure the most 
superb strain. Our collection comprises 
forty-twoof the best varieties in all colors and 
beautiful shadings, which we put up in se- 
parate packages. Our Mixed Sweet Peas 
are composed of all these varieties and will 
not fail to give satisfaction. 

Sweet Peas have since years been great 
favorites with our Ladies, and there is cer- 
tainly no other flower so well adapted for 
wearing or decorating purposes in every 
form as the Sweet Pea» 




Grow from five to six feet high and should 
be planted from November to March. 

I<uffa acutangula. Dish Rag Vine. 
A very rapid growing vine of the Gourd 
family. When the fruit is dry, the fibrous 
substance, whiph covers the seeds, can be 
used as a rag. February till April. 




Maurandia Barclayana. 
Tropaeolum majus- Nasturtium, 
Trailing plants with elegant flowers of dif- 
ferent shades, mostly yellow and crimson, 



Hyacinth Bean. 




Mina Lobata. 



Mina Lobata? a handsome novelty, i! planted early enough is one of 

the handsomest and best blooming' vines 

for our climate. 



114 



THB se:ed annual of th^ 




Single Hyacinth. 



Double Hyacinth. 



which are produced in great 
abundance. Four feet high. 
February till April. 

Thunbergia. Mixed Thun- 
bergia. Very ornamental vines, 
with yellow and white bell- 
shaped flowers with dark eye. 
Six feet high. February till 
May. 




Mixed Thunbergia. 



BULBOUS ROOTS. 



Hyacinths, (dutch. )Pouble and single. 
The Hyacinth is a beautiful llowering bulb, 
well suited for open ground or pot culture. 
They should be planted from October till 
February. If planted in pots it is well to 
keep in a cool, rather dark place, till they 
are well started, when they can be placed 
in the full light and sun. Double and 
single, 5c.. each; 50c per dozen. 

Narcissus. Bulbs of the easiest culture, 
planted from November to January. 

Double White^ sweet scented^ 35c. per do- 
zen. 

Paper White^ (single). Price, 5c. each; 
35c. per dozen. 

Trumpet Major, (single)., very fine, 50c. 
per dozen. 

Von Sion. 50c. per dozen. 

Anemones. Double flowering. Planted 
and treated the same as the Ranunculus. 
They are of great varieties in color- 
Double Dutch, 35 cents per dozen. 

Ranunculus. Double Flowering. The 
roots can be planted during fall and winter, 
either in the open ground or in pots. The 



French varieties are more robust than the 
Persian, and flowers are larger. The ground 
should be rather dry. and if planted in the 
open ground, it will be well to have the spot 
a little higher than the bed or border. 
French Ranunculus, 25 cents per dozen. 

Tulips. Double and single Tulips thrive 
better in a more Northern latitude than 
this, but some years they flower well here, 
and as they are cheap, a few flowering bulbs 
will pay the small amount they cost. They 
should not be planted later than December, 
and placed very shallow in the ground; not 
more than one-third of the bulb should be 
covered. When near flowering they require 
a good deal of moisture Single and double, 
25 cents per dozen. 

Scilla peruviana. These are green- 
house bulbs at the North, but here they are 
hardy, and do well in the open ground. 
There are two varieties — the blue and the 
white. The}^ grow up a shoot, on the end 
of which the flowers appear, forming a 
truss. Plant from October till January. 25 
cents each. 



Our Sweet Peas comppise all known varieties in the Finest and most 

delicate shading's. Give them a trial. 



RICHARD FROTSCHBR SEED CO., Ud. 



115 



Gloxinias. These are really bulbous 
green-house plantsbut they can be cultivated 
in pots and kept in a shady place in the gar- 
den, or window. They are very beautiiful; 
color from white to dark violet and crimson. 
The leaves are velvety, and on somevarieties 
very large. They should be planted early 
in spring; require sandy ground and a good 

time. 

cents 



deal" of moisture during flowering 

25 



French Hybrids, strong 
each; S^-So per dozen. 



bulbs, 




Ranunculus. 

Calla Aetheopica. Lilly of the Nile. 
As a winter blooming bulbous rooted pot 
plant there is 'hardly anything to come up 
to the beautiful Calla Lilly. The plant 
which is of an easy culture will bloom in 
the green-house as well as in a room near 
the window or even on the veranda as long 
as it is kept frost free. It may also be grown 
in a fishpond or tank in a green-house and 
produce its large pure white floweis. Bulbs 




Single Tulip, 




Anemones, 
should be potted in the months of October, 
November and December, and may be had 
to bloom from Christmas to March, 

Have large bulbs on hand, which we sell 
at 20 cents each, or $2 per dozen. 

Gladiolus. Hybrid Gladiolus, Really 
the best summer flowering bulbs; they have 
been greatly improved of late years, and 




Double Tulip. 



All Winter and Spring" Flowering" Bulbs should be planted not later 

than December. 



116 



th:^ sb:^d annuai, of th^ 



almost every color has been produced, 
tinged and blotched in all shades from 
delicate rose to dark vermillion. When 
planted at intervals during spring, they will 
flower at different times, but those that are 
planted earliest produce the finest flowers. 
The roots should be taken up in the fall. 




Scilla Peruviana. 

Hybrids mixed, first choice (extra). lo 
cents each; 75 cents per dozen. 

Hybrids white ground, first choice, 10 
cents each. 

Hybrids mixed. 50 cents per dozen. 

Dahlias. Fine double-named varieties. 
Plants so well known for their brilliancy, 
diversity or colors and profuse flowering 
qualities, that they require no recommenda- 
tion. They can be planted from February 
till May, and thrive best in rich loamy soil. 
They should be tied up to stakes, which 
ought to be driven into the ground before 
or when planting the bulbs. To have them 
flower late in the season they should be 
planted late in the spring, and the flower 




Gloxinias. 




Dahlias. 



Oup Collection of Gladiolus is the Finest ever brought to New Orleans. 

Give it a trial. 



RICHARD FROTSCHER SEi^D CO., Ltd. 



117 




Tuberoses, Double Flowering. 



buds nipped off when they appear; treated 
in this way, they will produce perfect 
flowers during falL Undivided roots, $3 
per dozen. 

The roots we offer are of the very best 
type, having taken special pains to discard 
varieties which did not flower well here. 

Tu"beroses. Double Flowering. They are 
ornamental for the garden, and very valuable 
for makiug bouquets, on account of their 
pure white color and great fragrance. Plant 
during the spring months. Strong bulbs, 
10 cents each; 75 cents per dozen. 



:o: 



JAPAN LILIES 



I/ilium auratum. Golden Band Lily. 
This is one of the handsomdst lilies; the 
flowers are large and white, each petal hav- 
ing a yellow stripe. It is of easy culture. 
A loamy, dry soil suits it best, if planted 
one inch deep. 

The past season we 
several of these noble 
they were really fine; 
opening at the same 



had occasion to see 
lilies in bloom, and 

half a dozen flowers 
time and measuring 



from six to nine inches across. Very fra- 
grant. We have fine bulbs, imported direct 
from their native country, flowering bulbs, 
20 cents each. 

I/ilium lancifolium album. Pure 
white. Japan Lily 30 cents each. 

I/ilium lancifolium Rubrum. White 
and red spotted, 15 cents each. 

I/ilium lancifolium roseum. Rose 
spotted, 15 cents each. ^^ 

These Japan Lilies are very beautiful and 
fragrant. Should be planted from October 
till January. Perfectly suited to this cli- 
mate. 

I/ilium tigrinum. Tiger Lily- A well 
known variety, very showy and of easy cul- 
ture; 10 cents each. 

I/illum Tigrinum, fl. pi. This is a 
very fine variety ;, perfectly double, and the 
petals are imbricated almost as regularly as 
a camelia fiower. Very fine; 15 cents each. 




Lilium Auratum. 



A group of Lilium auratum bordered off with L. Tigrinum looks very 
handsome and deserves space in every garden. 



31S 



THE se:ed annuai, of the 





Lilium Tiffrinum, 



Lilium Laucifoliura Eubrum, 



:o: 



LIST OF A FEW VARIETIES OF ACCLIMATED FRUIT TREES. 

StriTABI^B FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



HOW TO PL 

Althotigli there are numerous books and 
papers published on arboriculture, giving 
necessary information how to plant trees. 
and 5-et we are so often a»ked b}- some of 
our customers how to plant and prepare the 
soil for fruit trees, we therefore deem it 
necessary to give here some short intruc- 
tions, 

Make the orround thorouofhlv mellow at 
least 15 inches deep and 3 or 4 feet wide 
each way, if holes are to be dug; thorough 
plowing of the entire plat is preferable if it 
can be done. Prune the tree close; straighten 
out the roots evenly, having the tree stand- 



ANT TREES. 

ing the same depth it was in Nurser}-; work 
fine, mellow soil (but no manure) among 
the roots, and when they are all covered an 
inch or two. press the soil firmU- down with 
the foot or a broad ended maul, after which 
fill up evenly with loose soil, over which 
place a mulch of rotten straw or manure, 3 
or 4 inches deep, extending 3 feet every 
way from the tree. Whether the mulch is put 
on or not, keep the soil well cultivated about 
the tree. In this climate all trees should be 
headed low and lean a little to the north- 
west when planted. 



DISTANCES APART TO PLANT TREES. VINES. ETC. 



Peaches. Plums. Standard Pears, Apricots, 
in light soil, 16 to iS feet; in strong soil, iS 
to 20 feet each way. 

Figs should be planted 20 to 24 feet apart. 

Dwarf Pears, Quinces, etc., 10 to 15 feet 
apart. 

Japanese Persimmons, 10 to 12 feet. 

Grapes, such as Delaware, Ives Seedling, 



which are of slow growth, 6 to S feet apart 
each wa}". 

Thrift}- growers like Concord. Triumph, 
Goethe, etc.. 8 to 10 feet apart. 

Herbefhont, C5'nthiana, etc.. which are 
the most rapid growers. 12 feet apart, in 
rows ^ feet wide. 



I/B CONTE PEAR. 



This Southern Pear is as 
growth as the China Sand, and is an enor- 
mous bearer. The fruit is large, pale yel- 
low, juicy, melting, and of good quality. do- 
ing better in the South .than elsewhere. It I 
bears transportation %vell. Time of ripening J 
begins about the middle of July. So far. | 



this pear has never been known to blight. 
It promises to be the pear for the South. 

Rooted one year old trees. 4 to 6 feet 20c. 
each; S12.00 per 100; $2.00 per cozen; 2 
year old trees, 6 to 8 feet. 25c. each; 82.50 
per dozen; 61S.00 per 100. 



We handle only Southern grown Fruit Trees, acclimated and well 

adapted to our soil. 



RICHARD FROTSCHBR S^ED CO., I^td. 



119 




Le Conte Pear. 



DUCHBSS D'ANGOUIvKMB PBAR. 

Another popular variety which does well in this section. — On LeCoute Stock. One 
year old, 25c. each; |2.oo per dozen. 

HOWEI/I/ PBAR. 

One of the best for here. Tree is an upright free grower; and an early and profuse 
bearer. One year old, 25c. each; $2.00 per dozen. 

All Nursery stock handled by us is healthy, well rooted and perfectly 

free of scales and other insects. 



no 



THB SEED ANNUAI, OF THE 



KIBFFER'S HYBRIB PEAR. 

Avariety from Philadelphia; a hybrid 'between the China Sand and Bartlett. both of 
which resemble it in wood and foliage. It has the vigor and productivness of its Chinese 
parents. Fruit large and handsome; bright yellow and red cheek; flesh tender, juicy and 
well flavored. It comes into bearing at an early age. Ripens end of September, or be- 
ginning of Ojtobar. It is an excellent sort for preserving. 

One year old threes, branched and fine, 20c. each; I2.00 per dozen. 




Etetfer Pear. 



JEFFERSON PEAR. 

Another blight proof Pear, very distinct in habit and growth from other varieties 
tinder cultivation. Cannot be stated yet under what particular type or species it should 
be classed. 



The KieSep is undoubtedly the best ppeserving' and cooking Pear. 



RICHARD FROTSCHER S:EBD CO., I/td. 



121 



It ripens in Central Mississippi from the ist — loth of June, is in the market with the 
earliest peaches, and brings the highest prices. It is above medium size, color bright 
yellow, with a bright deep crimson cheek. It is ripe and marketed before Le Conte is 
ready to ship. Poor in flavor. 

One year old, 25c. each; $2.00 per dozen. 

GARBKR'S HYBRID PBAR. 

A cross between the China Sand and Louise Bonne de Jersey; grows vigorous and pro- 
ductive. Shape roundish, large red cheek, juicy and of good flavor with slightly acid. 
Price, 25c. each; $2.00 per dozen. 




Bartlett Pear. 

barti,:^ttp:^ar. 

This Well known variety, one of the finest pears in cultivation, has been successful 
cultivated here; but occasionally it has blighted. Since the introduction of the Le Conte, 
trials has been made with success, that is by grafting thi^. and other fine varieties, upon 
the Le Conte; — by so doing, the trees are imparted with the vigor of the latter, growing 
stronj^er. and making finer and healthier trees, We offer trees grafted on the Le Conte 
stock for sale. 

One year old trees^ 3"^4 feet, 25c. each; $2.00 per dozen. 

All varieties of Plum Trees in our Establishment are budded 

on the Marianna Stock, 



122 



THE SEED ANNUAL OF THE 



SATSUMA OR BI,OOD PI,UM. 

This Plum is from Japan and has been fruited in California a few years ago. The fol- 
lowing is the description given by the introducer, Mr. Luther Burbank: "It is nearly six 
weeks earlier than the Kelse3% firm flesh; much larger, of finer quality, color and form. It 
is an early and enormous bearer, and the trees grow with more vigor than any of the other 
varieties of Japan Plums I have fruited here. The seed is also the smallest yet seen." 

The flesh is dark red, solid color from skin to pit, firm, rather juicy, and of good 
flavor. Price, 25c. each; $2.50 per dozen. 

MARIANNA PLUM. 

This Plum originated in Texas, supposed accidental seedling of the Wild Goose. It is 
a rapid grower. Grows from cuttings; and never grows up any suckers or sprouts. Fruit 




Our Marianna Plums are groivn from cuttings aud are sound 

and healthy. 



RICHARD FROTSCHBR Sl^BD CO., I,td. 



123 



as large, good and handsome as the Wild Goose; one to two weeks earlier; hangs on better; 
ships well; ripens and colors beautifully, if picked a few days previously. It is the best of 
the Chickasaw type. This variety and the Wild Goose should be fertilized by the common 
Chickasaw kind to have it bear well. 

Price, 5 — 6 feet high, 20c. each; $2.00 per dozen; ^r2 00 per 100. 




Kelsey's Japan Phim. 



KEIvSEY'S JAPAN PI,UM. 

The Pruntis Domeshca, or European varieties, have proven worthless in the South 
generally. The above will take their place promising good results, being of Asiatic origin. 
The Kelsey Plum is from two to two and a half inches in diameter, heart-shaped, rich 
yellow, with purple cheek. Parties who have been fruiting it herein the South pronounce 
it the most magnificent plum they have seen; it weighs from 4 to 6 ounces. It excels all 
other plums for canning and drying, and will carry for a long distance better than any 
other kind. Matures middle of August to September. It has fruited in this neighbor- 
hood since 5 years, it is a most delicious fruit, and every one who plants fruit trees should 
not fail to plant some. We consider it a great acquisition. Price, 25 cents each; |;2 pet 
dozen> 

OGAN ANB BOTAN PI<UMS. 

Two other Japan varieties. They are vigorous, handsome growers; branches smooth 
with rich light green foliage. 

The Ogan is a large yellow variety, ripens early, and is very sweet. The Botan is 
very large, reddish blue; a good keeping and shipping fruit. Japan fruit does well here 
generally; everybody should try a few^ of these plums. 

Price, 25 cents each; $2 50 per dozen. 

APRICOT PI^tTM. 

(PRUNUS SI.MONI.) 

This plum comes from North China. It was fruited for the first time in 1885 by a well 
known nurseryman in Texas. The fruits, when ripening, shine like apples of gold, and 

The Kelsey is in every respect superior to the Green Gage or Reine Claude 
Plum of France, and deserves a place in every 
Fruit Orchard. 



124 



THE Sn^B ANNUAI, OF THIE 



become a rich vermillion when ripe. It is ver}' firm and mealy, and equal to any plum; 
and never been attacked by the Curculio. It will carry any desired distance. 

Tree very thrifty, upright; early aud abundant bearer. 

Price, one year old trees, 25 cents each; $2.50 per dozen. 



WII/D GOOS:e PI/UM. 

A native variety from Tennessee, where it is highly esteemed for market, 
strong grower; the fruit is large and of good quality. 
Price, 20 cents each; $2 per dozen. 



It is a 




Wild Goose Plnra. 



PBACH TREES. 

We have a fine assortment of Southern grown Trees, selected from a very reliable 



Nursery. They consist of the following varieties, viz: 



FREE STONES. 

Jessie Kerr. 
Amsden. 
Alexander. 
Early I/ouise. 
Fleitas St. John. 
Mountain Rose. 
Honey. 
Foster. 

Crawford's Early. 
Amelia. 

As they follow in the list they ripen in succession. 
Price, 25 cents; $2 per dozen; $15 per hundred. 



FREE STONES. 

stump the World. 
Thurber. 
Old Mixon. 
Crawford's I/ate. 
Smock. 

Picquet's IVate. 
Lady Parham. 



CLING STONES. 

General IVee. 

Stonewall Jackson. 

Old Mixon. 

Lemon. 

Heath.> 

Nix White Late. 

Stinson's October. 

Butler 

Chinese. 



The Peen To, or Flat Peach of China, we dropped from our collection, al- 
though it is the earliest variety. It is so easily affected by late 
frosts, and therefore bears seldom well. 



RICHARD PROTSCHBR SEED CO., Ivtd, 



125 




Japan Persimmon (Hachiya.) 

JAPAN PERSIMMON. 

This new valuable fruit has been fruited for the last few years. Most varieties are of 
excellent quality; twice and three times as large as the native kind; very attractive when 
the fruit is ripe. The fruit often weighs a pDund, is very sweet and of a most delicious 
flavor. As they are of easy culture and do well here, it is a profitable fruit to grow. 

Assorted named varieties. Price, 30c. each; I3.00 per dozen; large size $20.00 per 
100, 

NEW WHITE ADRIATIC PIG. 

This valuable variety has been introduced into this country from South Italy, where 
it is esteemed as the finest of all figs. The tree attains an enormous size and is an im- 
mense bearer, bearing more than any other variety known. 

The fruit is of the finest quality; the skin is thin like paper, thinnest at the base, and 
not like most other figs, thicker at the point. The pulp is very sweet, with small seeds, 
without a hollow space in the center, in fact, the whole fruit is one solid pulp. 

The size of the fiuit is larger than the white Smyrna Fig and a great deal finer in 
flavor. It begins to ripen in July, and Figs ripen from that time continually until frost. 
The principal crop is in August. 



Japanese Persimmons are not only very useful, but also very orna- 
mental and may be considered besides the orang-e the most 
decorative for a home garden. 



126 



th:^ sbbd annuai, of thb 



This variety is extensively grown in Italy for drying, and the finest dried Figs of com- 
merce are obtained from it. Since our climate is well adapted to its culture it will in time 
prove the most valuable of all Figs. 

Stock very limited. 

Price, 40c. each; ^4.00 per dozen. 

CKI/BSTB, OR CBI/BSTIAI, FIG. 

We have only a limited supply of one year old trees of this variety. They have been 
raised from cuttings in a sandy loam; are well rooted, and raised to a single stem; not in 
sprouts, as is often the case, when raised from suckers taken off from old trees. 

The cultivation of this fruit has rather been neglected, which should not be so, as the fig 
is always a sure crop, with ^ery little attention. It has commenced to be an article of com- 
merce when preserved; shipped from here it sells quite readily North, put up in that way. 
The Celeste is the best for that purpose; not liable to sour like the yellow skinned varie- 
ties, and sweeter than other dark skinned kinds. 

Price, 25c. each: $2.00 per dozen; '^15.00 per 100 and ^125.00 periooo, packed and de- 
livered on steamboat or railroad dej>ot. 

NBW POMEGRANATE **SPANISH RUBY.'^ 

This new variety of the well known Pomegranate is one of the most beautiful and 
finest of all fruits of our temperate climate. Fruit very large, as large as the largest ap- 
ple; eye very small , skin thick and smooth, pale yellow with crimson cheek; meat of 
the most beautiful crimson color, highly aromatic and very sweet. The Spanish Ruby is 
a fine grower and good bearer, and the fruit is excellent for shipping, as it will keep for a 
long time. 

It ripens shortly before Christmas and could be shipped to Northern cities, where dur- 
ing the holidays it would attract great attention. Price, 30c. each; $2,50 per dozen. 




Fxotscher's Egg Shell Pecans. 

LOUISIANA SOFT SHBI.I. PBCANS. 

This is a variety of nuts which only grows South, and is a sure crop here. Thostf 
who planted Orange trees twenty years ago, lost most of their labor in January. 18S6, when 
seven-eighths of trees were killed by the severity of the weather. If Pecan trees had been 
planted instead, they would have brought a handsome income and continued to increase 
every year in their production, furnishing a never failing crop for a whole century. 

Where space is no object Pecan trees should be planted, they are be- 
yond doubt the most profitable of all Fruit trees. 



RICHARD FROTSCHER SEED CO., Md. 



127 



Frotscher's Egg Shell. One of the largest, and beyond doubt the thinnest shell- 
ed Pecan known. The nuts are well filled and the meat is of a fine flavor. The above cut 
represents this variety in size as well as shape perfectly. 

Centennial. An extra large variety of long shape. The shell is very thin, but not 
quite as thin as the Egg Shell. The Centennial is one of the most prolific, and we recom- 
mend it highly. . , , , i 4. 

Romes. This is the largest of the thin shelled varieties. Although perhaps not 
quite as soft shelled as the preceding two, but in every respect equally as good. 




Centennial Pecans. 




Rome Pecans. 
Grafted Trees of the above three varieties can be had from us during the proper sea- 

"" fto's f^it^Tgh" Ci^^iied. each $..00. 4 to 6 feet high, .year buds each lr.50 
^ to 4 feet hifh I year buds, each |i.oo. 2 to 3 feet high this year buds each ^0.75. 
?5 per cent, off these prices in orders for 50 or more. Special deduction on orders for 

1000 or more. Prices to the trade on application. . 

Otir Pecan trees are budded from the above three leading vari- 

eties and true to name. 



328 



THE SBBD ANNUAL OF THE 



Since a number of years, Pecan Nuts for planting haveb;en sold here, and it was the 
o^er.eral balief that trees grown fro3i th23i WDuld bear the sains fruit as the parent plant. 
Experience has taught us since that this is not so. It is a Aell known law in nature that 
all plants show more or less tendency to hybridize, especially ii another of the same kind 
is near by as the pollen of one flower is easily transported to another. 

A tree may stand perfectly isolated, perhaps a mile from any another yet hybridization 
is possible, as Bees, which are after the nectar as well as the pollen will carr\' the latter 
from one tree to the other. 

Then we must also bear in mind that the tendency of a seedling is not towards an im- 
provement on. but rather '.owards a kind inferior to the parent tree. 

As it takes from lo to 15 years for seedling Pecans to bear, it is in our opinion a useless 
experiment to plant Pecan nuts to raise trees from unless for the purpose of growing 




Citrus Trifoliata. 



No Seedling" Pecans sold by us as we do not consider them reliable. 



RICHARD FROTSCHBR SEED CO., I/td. 129 

stools to bud onto. Life is too short to waste time in growing seedlings for 15 years only 
to be perhaps disappointed. The above facts have brought us to the conclusion not to 
sell any more Pecans for seed. 

For further information on Pecan culture, we will mail free on application our Pam- 
phlet, written by Mr. Wm. Nelson. 

ORANGE TREES. 

As of late years the Orange trees either on their own roots or on sour stock have dur- 
ing cold winters suifered to such an extent that if not completely killed it took several 
years for them to recover from the effects, it is essential for us to use for grafting or bud- 
ding upon a stock which is sufficiently hardy enough to stand our most severe winters. 

Such a stock we find in the wild native Orange of Japan. 

THE CITRUS TRIFOIylATA. 

This variety is in our climate deciduous and sufficiently hardy to stand without -pro- 
tection, the winters as far North as Washington D. C. and even wtih slight protection in 
New York. 

But not only as stools to graft or bud upon are the Citrus trifoliata of great value they 
are also excellent hedge plants and for the latter purpose far superior to the Cherokee 
rose, Osage Orange or any other, as they form, if properly trimmed an almost impene- 
trable hedge. They should then be planted from 8 to 12 inches apart. 

We have imported from Japan seed of the Citrus trifoliata, which we offer at $1.50 
perlb.;4oc. per ^ lb. In lots of 10 lbs. and over $1.25. 

Our Orange Trees are all budded on trifoliata stock and consequently perfectly hardy. 
We will handle only such varieties as are adapted to our climate, forinstance: 

Brazilian or Bahia. An excellent variety, with large sweet fruit. The tree is almost 
entirely thornless. 

Louisiana Sweet. This is one of the best and sweetest. It originated in Southern Louis- 
iana and had been informer years besides the Mandarin the only variety planted here. 

Satsuma. The hardiest variety for our climate. It is an abundant bearer and the 
fruit resembles the Mandarin very much but is almost entirely seedless. 

Jaffa or Joppe, similar to the Brazilian except in shape of the tree. It grows more up- 
right, taller and does not bear quite as much. 

Mardarin. This is one the finest and tenderest of the entire Orange tribe, The tree 
is of a dwarfish habit and an abundant bearer. An excellent table vatiery. 

Tangierin. A variety brought to Florida from Tangier, Africa, and from there to Louis- 
iana. It is a good bearer and greatly esteemed by our Orange growers. 

THE JAPANESE MAMMOTH CHESTNUT. 

Castanea vesca var. Japonica. 

As our climate and soil seems to be well adapted for all varieties of Japanese Fruit 
Trees Mr. Frotscher imported six years ago, for a trial, some seeds of the Japanese Mam- 
moth Chestnut, which were planted here and came up readily. So far they have done 
exceedingly well. 

There are several fine trees in this vicinity, grown from that seed, one of which bore 
several burrs for the first time last year and an abundant crop this year each burr contain- 
ing two large and perfect nuts. The nuts are much larger than any of those imported from 
Italy or Spain, and equally as good and fine in flavor. 

There is no doubt that the Chestnuts from Japan will bear well here and are especially 
adapted to our climate and soil. It is to be hoped that the culture of this valuable fruit 
will receive as much attention as has been paid to Pecan culture. Trees, 50c. each. 



-♦•♦- 



JAPANESE WALNUTS- 

Juglans Japonica cordiformis . 

Another variety of Japanese Fruit, the trees of which will bear here as well as the 
above mentioned Chestnut. There are several trees in Louisiana which were planted four 
years ago and are doing excellently well. One of them bore last year a number of fine nuts. 
The fruit is nearly the size of the English Walnut,heart-shaped,and, although hard shelled, 
is very easy to open. 

The shell is composed of two halves and can be opened by inserting the point of a 
knife in the seam, and the kernel may be taken out whole. This nut is very sweet, of a 
finer flavor than the English Walnut and cannot be too highly recommend. Trees 50c. 
each. 



130 



THE SEED ANNUAL OF THE 



GRAPEVINES. 

Have some select varieties for the table, aud for making wine, 
of them, viz: 



The following is a list 



Moore's Early. Large size and very 
earl}', good for table use. Price. 20c. each. 

Delaware. Well known. Regarded as 
best American Grape; it does well in the 
South, with good soil and high culture. 
Price. 20C. each; f2.oo per dozen. 

Goethe. Light Pink; very fine for table 
use. It is the best of the Roger's hybrids. 
Price. 20c. each; S2.ooper dozen. 

Triutapli. This is a late variety, bunches 
very large, golden when fully ripe, fine as 
best foreign, and sells equally well: melt- 
ing pulp, small seeds, vigorous as Concord, 
of which it is a hybrid seedling. Rarely it 
rots; stands pre-eminently at the head as a 
late table grape. Price, 20c. each. 

Norton's Virginia. An unfailing never 
rotting, red wine grape of fine quality. 
Price, 20C. each; $2.00 per dozen. 

Cynthiane. Very much like the latter; 
same price. 

Concord. Early; very popular, good for 
market. Some years it rots. loc. each; 
Ifi.oo per dozen. 



Ives. Ripens with the Concord. Good 

for wine; vigorous aud productive. loc 
each; $r.oo per dozen. 

Herbemont (McKee). A most popu- 
lar and successful red or purplegrape in the 
South; excellent for table and wine. McKee 
is identical with it. Price, 20c.; S2.00 per 
dozen. 

Niag'ara. A vigorous growing variety, 
bearing large bunches of transparent white 
grapes, which when fully ripe, are of excel- 
lent quality either for the table or wine mak- 
ing. 20c. each; $2.00 per dozen. 

Scuppernong:. This is a native of the 
South and does excellent here but requires 
a dry place. It is excellent for covering an 
arbor where it has a chance to grow un- 
hindered. 

The Scuppernong is averse to pruning 
and should be allowed to grow wild. Price, 
20C. each; Si. 50 per dozen. 

Prices for other Nursery Stock will be 
given on application. 




Michers tarlv Strauberrv. 



Our selection of Grape Vines Is the most suitable for our climate. 



RICHARD FROTSCHER SEED CO./ I^td. 



131 



MICHEIy'S EARI/Y STRAWBERRY. 

We have various sorts of soil in lyouisiana, and the Strawberry suitable to and suc- 
ceeding equally well in poor or rich land, can only be determined by practical experi- 
ment. 

There are but few varieties which adapt themselves to all sides and latitudes, hence 
the importance of planting those which experienced fruit growers have tested and found 
profitable. A Strawberry having all the good qualities, has not, and perhaps never will 
be discovered; still in choosing, it is well to purchase plants having as many good points 
as possible. This we claim for the Michel's Early. 

It is claimed to be the earliest in cultivation. It makes perfect flowers and fruit. 
Very prolific. Price, 6oc. per loo; $5.00 per 1000. 

After another year's trial, we consider this variety superior to the Sucker State, 
being earlier and more prolific. It will become the leading market sort, home and for 
shipping North. Have dropped the Sucker State from our list as the Michel's Early 
is superior and earlier. 



■*-♦-»■ 



ban- 



CHINA UMBRELLATREE- 

We have to offer a large lot of these shade trees, known to be well adapted for 
quettes or yards. These trees have been transplanted. 
Price, 75c. each; $7.00 per dozen. 

JERUSUAI^EM ARTICHOKE. 

This tuber is well-known, and requires no further description. It is used for the 
table, also for stock feed. It does better in a rich loam, should be planted and cultivated 



like potatoes. 



They yield very heavily. 



•:o: 



EXTRA CLEANED BIRDSEED- 

We make a specialty to put up choice re-cleaned bird seed in cartoons holding one 
pound. These cartoons contain a mixture of 

SICII^Y CANARY, HEMP, GERMAN RAPE, 

AND GERMAN MII^I^ET, 

all re-cleaned and of best quality. 

Have also plain Canary put up in same way, one pound cartoons; this is of the very best 
quality and also re-cleaned. Price, loc. per cartoon; 3 cartoons, 25c. 

Have also in bulk, the above as well as Hemp, 
Rape and Millet. 

Cuttle Fish bone, 5c. a piece; 50c. a pound. 

Prepared Mocking Bird Food in large size 
bottles, 35U. each. 

Bird Gravel. Small sized box, 5c. ; large 
sized box, loc. 

PRATT'S POUI.TRY FOOD. 

This Egg producer is too well known to make 
any comment on same; it makes larger fowls, 
quickens the growth of young chicks, prevents 
and cures all poultry diseases. The manufacturer 
claims it to be a sure cure for Chicken Cholera, 
Roups, Gapes and all diseases that poultry are 
subject to. Price per packet 25c. 



f< 



RATT5 nui^nr 




We are prepared to give prices on oilier shade trees on appli- 
cation. 



132 • THE SEED ANNUAI, OF THE 




HA! HA! HA! 

NO MITES OR I/ICE ON US— MUCKER'S 

MEDICOI< EGGS. THE WONDER 

OF THE AGE. 

It will, we guarantee, kill and drive away any Mites, 
Ivice or any other vermin that may be on the fowl or in 
the nest. One egg placed in the nest, the slight odor 
coming through the shell will do the work completely. 
Put up and guaranteed by The Zucker Manufacturing Co. 

.SPANISH PEANUTS. 

An early and very prolific variety, which grows erect and does not spread on the 
ground like other kinds. Can be cultivated entirely with a plow and are easily gathered 
as all the peas hang close to the roots. The stems when harvested make a good hay. The 
fruit is smaller than the Virginia or Tennessee, but the plants yield heavier. A very good 
feed for fattening hogs. 

Price per pound, 15c.; by mail, post paid, 25c.; per peck, 75c. 

White Virginia Peanuts — Per pound, loc. 

Red Tennessee — Per pound, loc; if by mail, 8c. extra must be added to cover postage. 

CHUFAS 

This nut is splendid for fattening hogs; it has a fine flavor. The nut sends up a single 
spire so much like Coco, it might deceive even an experienced eye at first appearance. 
Around this spire a multitude of others form rapidly. At the foot of each spire is a nut, 
never more than two inches in the ground. When harvesting the crop, you have only to 
gather all the spires and give a slight pull which will bring the entire cluster up with 
nine-tenths of the nuts. Unlike the Coco, the Chufa will die out in two or three years, if 
neglected or allowed to be choked with grass or weeds. Price, 15c. per pound; ^1.25 per 
peck; $4 per bushel. 

COTTON SEED. 

We have of the above a large assortment, of which the following is a list of the leading 
varieties 

Petit Gulf ^0.75 per bushel of 30 pounds. 

Peterkin 1.50 " •' 30 " 

Bancroft's Herlong — 1.50 " " 30 " 

Allen, long staple 1.50 " " 30 " 

Boyds' Prolific 2.00 " " 30 " 

Peerless - 2.00 " " 30 " 

Sealsland 2.50 *' *' 40 " 

With kind permission of Dr. W. C Stubbs, Director Ivouisiana Experiment Stations, 
we publish the following extract from Bulletin No. 4: 

DISEASES OF POTATOES- 

Potato Rot. Potato rot is now recognized to be caused b}' a fungus disease known as 
Phytophthorainfestus, the mycelium of which permeates the intercellular tissues of the 
potato and by means of haustoria or suckers absorb the nutriment from the surrounding 
cells. This mycelium, pushing its way through the intercellular spaces, throws out 
branches which penetrate the breathing pores of the potato and soon upon these branches 
are born pear-shaped conidia. These conidia correspond to the seeds of phanerogamous 
or flowering plants and are held and carried by the atmosphere, so that at anytime they 
may fall upon the potato or vine and with the assistance of moisture growth readily takes 
place. From this second growth, as conidia only serve to propagate the disease through 
the growing season, the spores are formed, which lie dormant through the winter and on 
the arrival of spring the disease recommences its destructive career by the germination 
of the winter spores. ^^-i^ 

Remedies and Preventives. In addition to exercising care in the handling of potatoe 
the storing of them away in a dry cool room and the planting of them on a well drained 
or light loamy soil, the following has been used with marked success: 

Bordeaux Mixture, (a) sulphate of copper (pulv.), 6 pounds in 4 gallons of hot water; 
(b) fresh lime, 4 pounds in 4 gallons of cold water. Mix (a) and (b) slowly and thor- 
oughly and dilute to 22 gallons. 



RICHARD FROTSCHBR SEED CO., I/td. 



133 



Ammonia Solution of Copper, (a) copper carbonate, 3 ounces; (b) ammonia, Cliquid),' 
I quart. Dissolve (a) and (b) and dilute to 22 gallons. 

Potato Scab. For a long time scientists were at variance as to the cause of the potato 
scab. From the discovery of so many fungus diseases in connection with vegetables it 
was thought that the scab on potatoes was due to the presence of some fungus, but by actual 
experiment it has been found that the same variety of potatoes on the saaie soil may be 
influenced to produce scab by the application of certain substances to the soil. It has 
been found, as every potato producer will testify that potatoes grown on new land, or 
land containing a good deal of decaying vegetable matter, become more or less affected by 
scab. In the latter case it may be due to the presence of insects, as millepedes are nearly 
always found in this kind of soil. It is true that decaying vegetable matter has a great 
attraction for those insects and that they readily feed upon decaying potatoes, but it has 
also been shown, that where millepedes are very numerous much damage maybe done by 
them to perfectly sound potatoes. It is now generally conceded that these scabs are due to 
injury to the breathing pores or lenticles of the skin of the potato, as when they are 
injured, abnormal growth at once begins and ulcers or scabs are formed. 

Regarding remedies nothing definitely can be recommended, except to guard against 
injury by insects by not using the same ground for potatoes two or three years in succes- 
sion. Avoid undrained land and soil containing large quantities of humics. 



:o: 



FARM AND GARDEN IMPLEMENTS- 

"PLANET JR." IMPlvEMENTS. 

NOTE. — The prices on the Planet Jr. implements are made by the Manfacturers and 
no one is allowed to deviate from them. 

It is compulsory that all parties handlings these goods must abide by this rule or else 
they will loose all right to sell them. 

THE ''PlyANET JR." 

Combined Drii^i,, Wheei, Hok, Cui^tivator, Rake and Pi^ow. 

This machine is said to be one of the most complete garden tools in operation. The 
proprietors claim that every purchaser of one of these Drills will find it an excellent seed 
sower, a first-class double wheel hoe for use vv^hile plants are small, a first-class single 




wheel hoe, an excellent furrower, an admirable wheel cultivator, a capital garden rake, a 
rapid and efficient garden plow, and it is without an equal in variety of tools easy adjust- 
ment, lightness, strength and beauty. It is a practicable every day time and labor saver, 
besides a remedy for back-ache. Price, $9.00 net. 



134 



THE SKED ANNUAIv OF THE 



THE NEW ' PI/ANET JR." NO. 3. 

SiNGi,:^ Wheel Hell Droppixg Garden Drzll. 

Until quite recently there was no such thing as a good Hill Dropping Seeder: the 
most modern drills sowing the seed in a continuous row only. But the demand for a 
perfect machine that can be adjusted to plant both in hills and drills is very large, and 
properly so. If seed is drilled, and the plants thinned, it is often hard to find strong 
plants at regular distances, even with thick sowing; but with hill planted crops less seed 
is required and you are almost sure to find two or three good plants at the esa:t spot 
where one is wanted. Therefore all thinned crops should be planted in hills. 




What the Drill will do. This Drill will sow a continuous row with greater regularity 

than any drill that we have ever made, but its distinctive feature is that it will also drop 
very neatly in hills. It opens the furrow, drops either in hills or drills at pleasure. covers. 
rolls down and marks the nest row at all one operation. Price, S9.00. 

^'PLANET JR." WHEEL HOES- 

THE "PLANET JR." DOUBI^E WHEEI. HOE. 

Cultivator, Rake and Plow Combined. 

This is an invaluable imple- 
ment to every tiller of the soil. 
It is the best and cheapest made 
for the cultivation of garden 
vegetables on a large scale, as 
one man with it will do more 
work in a day than 6 with or- 
dinary garden hoes. The at- 
tachments consist of four culti- 
vator teeth, two rakes, two 
long hoes and two plows. The 
wheels bring adjustable, both 
sides of the row can be culti- 
vated at the same time. Hav- 
ing leaf guards which allow the 
cultivation of large plants, it is 
indispensable for cultivating 
beets, carrots, peas and beans 
when already advanced in 
growth. Taking all in ail, it is 
one of the best cultivators made. 

Price. §6.00 net. 




RICHARD FROTSCH:eR SEIBD CO., I/td. 



135 



THB "PI/AN:eT JR." 

siNGivB whb:^I/ ho:^. 



CUI.TIVATOR, Rake and Plow- 
Combined. 
This tool is considerably 
lighter than the ''Double 
Wheel" Hoe; having almost 
similar attachments it is cap- 
able of doing nearly the same 
kind of work. It is furnished 
with one pair of rakes, one pair 
of curved-point hoes, three cul- 
vator teeth, one large garden 
plow and one detachable leaf 
guard. All the blades are steel 
hardened in oil, tempered and 
polished. It is cised for culti- 
vating both sides ot the row at 
one passage. Price, ^l-So net. 





THE **FIRE FLY. 



)» 



Single Whe'^l Hoe, Culti- 
vator AND Plow Combined. 
This implement is almost 
identical with the "Planet Jr." 
Single Wheel Hoe. The tools 
supplied with it are two curved, 
point hoes, a set of three culti- 
vating teeth and a large garden 
plow. The hoes work either to 
or from the row. The rever- 
sible cultivator teeth can be 
used for deep work in sets of 
two or three. The garden plow 
is valuable for furrowing, cover- 
ing, hilling etc. 

Price, $3-75- 



THE "FIRE FI,Y." 

Wheel Garden Plow\ 
This tool is intended for those who have 
small gardens and a moderate amount of 
time to work in them. It enables them to 
raise vegetables for their family or. for 
market, with a small expenditure of labor 
and time. Price, $2.00 net. 

CI^EVE'S ANGI/E TROWEI/. 

This handy digger was originally intend- 
ed for digging plantains and other weeds 
from lawns, its slim blade, made strong by 
its angular form, being suited for prying 
and twisting, but it has also found great 
favor among theladies as a flower cultivator 
for loosening the soil in pots, and 




Fire Jb'ly AVheel Garden Tlow, 



young plants for transplanting, The blade and shank are one solid piece of best 
set firmly in a nice handle. It serves every purpose of the old form of trowel. 
No. I, 35c.; No. 2, 25c.; No. 3, 15c. 



steel, 
Price, 



136 



Tnn S^niy ANNUAI, OF THB 



IMPROV:^D PlyANTING DIBBI^B 

This tool is designed for setting out cabbage, celery, tobacco, tomato, onions and simi- 
lar plants, and for small nursery stock, will com- 
mend itself to every gardener, florist, nurseryman 
and amateur. The price is low; it is made entirely 
of iron, but of a peculiar pattern which makes it 
strong and light and more durable than similar tools 
on the market. It is of convenient shape, neat and 
attractive in appearance. Price. 40c. each; if ordered 
by mail, 20c. must be added for postage. 

THl^ COMBINATION WK:eD:ER. 

Combining as it does, both the rake and hoe, 
it is the most serviceable, durable and the most 
perfect Weeder on the market. The manufac- 
turers guarantee every Weeder to give satisfac- 
tion to the purchaser or refund the price paid, 
25c. 






Excelsior Weeding Hoofe. 

THB Iv:evin pru- 
n:^r. 

This is one of the 
strongest and best cut- 
ting pruners for its size. 
The cut is very smooth, 
very much more so com- 
pared lo other pruners, 
and is faster than a knife. 
It is a splendid and cheap 
instrument for trimming 
young trees, rosebushes, 
vines, etc. Any lady or 
child can use it and make 
_^„„_ a half or three-quaiter 

inch cut according to size, without any strain or jar whatever. Give it a trial and be con- 
vinced of its good qualities. 

Price, No. i, 7 inches long, }4 inch cut, |i.oo No. 2, 7 inches long, finch cut, $i.25c 
By mail, postpaid- 

SELF-CLOSING TOMATO VINE SUPPORT. 

Patented March i3tli, 1894. 





READY FOR USE 





JN use: 



iSQTlNlUSD 



RICHARD FROTSCHBR SI^BD CO., I<td. 



137 



I 




tvp'/mar^ 




SELF-CLOING ADJUSTABLE TOMATO 

SUPPORTS- 

There are made on the same principle as the above; only they can be adjustable ac- 
cording to the height of the plant, either lower or higher as shown in the two cuts. 

All are solid wire frames, galvanized and will not easily rust or rot, are easily placed 
in position, and just as easily removed at the end of the season. As they are folding, they 
may be stored away in a small place when not in use. With proper care they last a life 
time. Price, 15c. each; I12.50 per 100. Not less than 50 sold at this price. 

GARDEN IMPLEMENTS. 




Ladies Set, Floral Tools, No. 5. 




Boys' Favorite Set. 




Weeding Hoe and Rake Combined. 



13S 



THK SEED ANNUAL OF THB 




Weiss' Hand Pruning Shear. 




French Perfection Shear. 




SaTnor's Pruning Knife Xo, 192. 




Savnor's Pruning Knife No. 194. 




Slide Pruning Shear, 




Hedge Shear, 




Spading Port, D. Handle. 



RICHARD FROTSCHBR SiEBD CO., I.td. 



139 



LANG'S 





Oast Steel Garden Trowel. 



30* 
_^BrMAiL 
ON EARTH. Prepaid 




strawberry or Transplanting Fork. 




/ 

WOODASON'S BEI/I/OWS. 

Double Cone (for insect powder) 3 oo 

Single " " " I oo 

Atomizer (for liquid and powder) 2 oo 

Pure Pyrethrum Powder for above bellows... J lb. box 15c.; ^ lb. 25c.; i lb. boxes 50 

Hammond's Bellows for Slug Shot i 50 

DEAKIN'S IMPROVED BRASS GARDEN SYRINGES. . 

AMERICAN. 

kn Length of Barrel, 12 in. ; diem., 1. 




No. A.— Length of barrel, 12 inches; diameter, i inch, with one stream and spray rose. 
Price. $2.25. 

No. 2 —Ladies' Garden Syringe; Length of barrel, 14 ;5^ inches, diameter 15-16 inches; 
with one stream and two spray roses. The two roses, when not in use, are screwed on the 
sides of the barrel, as shown in cut. Price, $4.25. 

No. II— (Second Quality.) Length of barrel, 18 inches; diameter i}4 inches. Open 
Rose Syringe, full size. Two spray roses and one stream. Side attachments. Price, $4.25. 



140 



THE SEED ANNUAIv OF THE 



DEAKIN'S NEW SYRINGES. 

The cheapest all brass syringes made; full length of 
barrel of the largest size, i8 inches; 1% inches diameter. 
The following is what the manufacturers say about 
them: "In response to the oft expressed desire of our 
customers for a very cheap brass syringe of large capa- 
city of barrel, we have decided to place upon the market 
syringes which we feel confident will give satisfaction. 

They are all brass full length syringes, fill quickly 
and discharge perfectly. Price, letter H, $2.25. 

" K, 1.75. 

TheDeakin's Syringes are known to be the best 
manufactured in America, and are far superior to the im- 
ported. 

THE ACME HAND FORCE PUMP. 

In the introduction of the new Acme Pump, the 
manufacturers have endeavored to present a cheap, 
durable and powerful Force Pump. With the exception 
of the Iron Base and two foot rubber hose it is made 
entirely of Brass and is very substantial. 

Wherever vermin and Icsect Pests can be reached 
with the various solutions, the Acme will be found in- 
valuable as an exterminator. For use in the Orchard, 
Green-house and Garden, it answers all requirements. 

The Acme is useful for Washing Carriages and handy 
in case of fire. The discharge end of the nozzle is so 
can be used for Veterinary purposes. 

The Acme Pump. 

IvEWIS' AGRICUlvTURAI, SYRINGE. 

This exterminator is 26 inches long by if inches in diameter. It is made of Zink 
tubing which does not rust by using strong chemicals. The piston is fitted with Lewis' 
Patent Expansion Valve, which holds the liquid at any point in the tube, except on pres- 
sure of the handle, when it discharges the liquid on each hill. It is very simple and dur- 
able, also the cheapest syringe on the market. Price, ^1.25. 

THE '%ITTI,E GEM" SPRAYING PUMP. 

This Pump is made entirely of brass. The working parts, discbarge and connecting 
tubes plunger, rod and air chamber, so that all parts (except the rubber hose and valve 
packing) that come in contact with the liquid, are of brass, making it practical for using 



shaped that it 
Price, ^3.75. 




A 




any of the insecticides, emulsions, arsenites, fun- 
gicides or ammoniacal mixtures now in common 
use for saving fruit, foliage and flowers from des- 
truction by insects and fungus. It is supplied 
with two brass nozzles^ one for a round or solid 
stream; the other, our '"Combination Vermorel." 
which throws a fine misty spray, using only a small 
amount of liquid to cover a large space; and, by a 
brass needle point operated by a spring, may be 
condensed to spray a single plant without spray- 
ing the ground between the plants, and also serves 
to clear the nozzle of an}- obstruction that might 
lodge in the aperture. It has two feet of vulcani- 
zed rubber hose, to which is attached a brass 
hand tube, with the solid stream nozzle firmly 
fastened, to which the Vermorel is attached or 
detached by a screw connection, at the pleasure of 
the operator. 

The large capacity of the air-chamber and 
length of cylinder, together with the power of 
the inflating valve, enables itto throw a continuous 
steady stream fifty feet, or a steady spray for 
thirt}' seconds or more after the operator stops 
pumjping. . The pump is neat in design, very 
compact, strong and durable, nothing liable to get 
out of repair or wear out that could not be re- 



RICHARD FROTSCHBR SBED CO., I<td. 



141 



placed at a cost of a few cents. The entire weight of the pump complete is 4 pounds. 
When boxed ready for shipment, 7 pounds. The price, with both nozzles including an 
iron stirrup for holding it firmly in the pail with the foot, is $4.50^ 




CHAMPION FORCE PUMP. 

This cut illustrates a Portable Force Pump, 
which, combining as it does, the efficiency and 
durability of the higher piiced pumps on the 
market, is offered at a price which places it within 
the reach of alL 

Being made of brass, with white metal top and 
base, it will not rust or corrode. It is capable of 
throwing from 5 to 6 gallons per minute to a dis- 
tance of 50 feet. For washing windows, carriages, 
verandas, etc., it has no equal. 

By simply adjusting the Sprinkler which goes 
with each pump, it is adapted for spraying gar- 
dens, lawns, etc., also for throwing liquid solu- 
tions of all kinds to destroy noxious insects on 
plants, vines and small trees. 

This pump is furnished with two feet of ^ inch 
discharge hose, and a tin nozzle and sprayer. It 
has no suction hose, as the Pump sets in the 
water, thus securing perfect suction. 

The weight, when boxed for shipment, is about, 
8 pounds. Price, $4.00. 



RUBBER, PI/ANT and FLOWER SPRINKLER. 

Very handy for sprinkling tender plants. Small seeds 
and cut flowers. These sprinklers are made in 3 different 
sizes : 

8 oz. with hard Rubber nozzle, 50c. 

10" •' •' " " , 60c. 

12" '• " " " 80c. 

Scollays Plant Sprinkler, braze nickle plated nozzle, 
90c. Postage extra 15c. 

TOBACCO DUST. 

We have a large supply of this well known insecticide, 
which is one of the best and cheapest insect destroyers knov n 
It is one of the most effective agents against the cabbage- 
fly and worms, which are so injurious and destructive to Cab- 
bage and Cauliflower plants; also for Cucumbers and Me- 
lons. 

Used very extensively by the largest Cucumber growers 

in this vicinity with satisfactory results. It is generally put 
on plants in the morning when the dew is on them or just 
after a rain. After a few applications it has been found to 
be very effective. Price, 10 lb. packages, 25c.; 50 lbs. 75.; 
100 lbs. $1.50. 




142 



THE sb:bd annual of the 




Hammond's Slug-Shoi Duster. 



HAMMOND^S SI/UG SHOT. 

An excellent article for destroying cabbage fleas, 
green lice, turnip and beet Qj , potato bug, grub -worms, 
etc. It is ready for use. and only requires to be dusted 
on to the plants while they are wet with the dew in the 
morning, or when applied in the evening, plants should 
be watered over the leaves half an hour before the Slug 
Shot is applied. 

5 lb. packages, 30c. : in bulk I4.00 per 100 lb. 

Have Dusters for distributing the above powder. 

Price, I gallon size. 35c.: half gallon size. 25c. 

An hour after applying the Slug Shot, have your 
plants well sprayed off" with clean water until every bit 
of the powder is removed. Although this Insecticide is 
quite harmless and an excellent fertilizer, it may some- 
times have an ill eff"ect on young plants on account of 
the small quantity of arsenious acid it contains. 

WHAI,E OIL SOAP. 

Very effective for washing trees and destroying all 
insects on the bark; it is also an exterminator of insects 
and lice on plants and shrubbery. Mix at the rate of 
one pound of soap to two quarts of hot water, and then 
add five gallons of cold water apply with watering pot or 
syringe; used in this manner it will promptly rid cab- 
bage or any other vegetable plants, also rose bushes and 
all sorts of fruit trees of the aphides and other insects 
which so often injure them. Price, i lb. boxes 15c. 



The following Mixture has been found to be very effective in destroy- 
ing all parasites and insects on fruit trees: 

KEROSENE EMUI/SION. 

This solution is used with great success in killing all sucking insects, such as scales, 
plant lice, and above all the destructive Icterya or Cottony Cushion Bug on orange and 
other fruit trees. 

The following formula will be found one of the best: 

Dissolve ^2 lb. of Whale Oil Soap in ^2 gallon of boiling water, then add i gallon of 
Kerosene Oil, churn the mixture with a force pump till it forms a cream which thickens 
upon cooling. For scale insects dilute one part of the emulsion with nine parts of water, 
and for all other insects one part of the emulsion with fifteen parts of water. This mixture 
can be very easily made by any person using the above ingredients. 



PRICE-LIST OF GARDEN IMPLEMENTS. 



Floral Tools. 

No. 8. Boys' Garden Set, 3 pieces. Hoe. Rake and Spade 

No. 80. '' " 4 " Hoe, Rake. Spade and Fork 
No. 5. Ladies' Set, 4 pieces. Hoe, Rake, Spade and Fork 



Forks. 

Geneva Spading, Long Handlec 4 tine - _ 

" " " '• (strapped) 

Spading Short Handled Cstrapped) 75c., fi.oo and 

Manure Geneva Long Handled, 4 tine (strapped) 

" •' •' 5 tine '* 

'• •' " '• 6 tine •' 

Oxford Hay Forks, 3 tine (5 foot handle) 

3 tine (6 

4 tine (6 












Si 


35 


I 


45 


I 


00 




75 
80 


I 


25 




70 




90 


I 


00 




45 




55 
60 



RICHARD FROTSCHBR SEKB CO., I^td. 143 



< ( 



Hoes- 

W. A. Lyndon's Louisiana, No. oo — Field without handle 90 

'' '' No. o— " " 100 

«' <' No. I— " " I 10 

«• •' No. 2— " " • I 20 

W. A. Lyndon's Louisiana, No. i — Toy ** 90 

" •' No. 2 — " " I 00 

Two Pronged Weeding, with handle 30 

Harper's Hoe and Rake, Combined -^.— 40 

Dutch or Scuffle, with handle (American) 50 

Solid Shank Planter's with handle, No. 2 45 

German Pattern Garden, No. 7 — o 30 

•' No. 5—0 35 

<' •' No. 3—0 with handle 40 

•' *• No. I— o *' 45 

Knives. 

Saynor & Cooke's Budding from 75c. to i 50 

Saynor & Cooke's Budding |i.oo and i 40 

Maher & Grosh's Budding, (Cocoa handle) 40 

Potato Hooks- 
Long Handled, 4 tine (Goose Necked) Geneva 45 

" '' 6 tine 50c., 55c. and 45 

Pruning Saws- 

Diston's 12 inch No. 7 80 

Crescent 12 inch 75 

Duplex 16 '' r.. i 00 

" 18 inch No. 7 i 10 

Rakes- 

Geneva Tool Co's, Cast Steel Bow, 10 teeth, (Braced) 45 

'* " " '' 12 " " 45 

♦« " *' " 14 '« i' 50 

" " '« 16 '< " 60 

Challenge Rakes, (Malleable Iron) loteeth 25 

'' " 12 " 30 

14 " 35 

Wooden Hay Rakes « 25 

Spades. 

Ames' Long Handled Bright ~ 90 

Hadwins' Long Handled 65 

D. •' 65 

Toy for Boys or Ladies 35 

Shovels - 

Ames' Bright Long Handled (round point)... • 90 

Hadwin's Long Handled (round point) 65 

Scythe Snaths- 

Handles for French Scythe Blades (with Ring and Wedge) 75 

Sickles - 

French Sickles, No. i 35 

" '• No. 3 40 

Scythes. 

French First Quality (polished) 18 inches _ 75 

" ♦' ' " 20 " 80 

<( li K i; 22 '* 8^ 

" '• " " 24 '' 90 

" " " " 26 " „ I 00 

" " " " 28 " - I 10 

" Second Quality (blue) 22 " 75 

" •' " " , 24 •* 80 

" " " " 26 " --..."."!!!!."! 90 

" " u «« 28 " I 00 

French (Croix brand) 22 icnhes 70 

24 •' 75 






144 TH:E SE:ED ANNTJAI, OF THB 

French (Croix brand) 26 inches „.. 80 

28 '' ..„.„... „.....„. 90 

Have also the above blades bridled @ 4oe. extra each. 



Shears. 



Hedge Shears, 8 inches.. 
" " 10 "^ 



Pruning Shears, No. 2. Wiss. .4 ..„ ,„.. 

^' No. 3, '^ , 

No. 4, \ " , 

" '* No. I, Wiss. B , „ 

'; ^' No. 2, *' 

Pruning Shears, Hessenbruch (German) Ladies Favorite for Roses, No. 37 — 14c — m 

" *' '* " No. 8— 2o>2 c— m 

' '[ "^ - K u- No. 8— 23>^c— m 

Pruning Shears, French Perfection, No. i 

" '- " ^' No. 2 

•' " Extra Heavy French, (Fat. Brass Spring) Nos. i and 2 „ 

" " Heavy French, (Faber) No. 2. 

Slide Pruning Shear, No. i, Saynor & Cooke 

" " '' No. 2, '' " 

t» K ti No. -7 '♦ *« 

" " '♦ No. 4,' ' "' " ZZ.... 

Eagle Pruning Shears, (American) — , ., 

Waters^ Improved Tree Pruners 10 feet 



tt bo- t/fe Vi -rz-y 



2 


00 


I 


75 


2 


25 




65 




50 




40 




75 




60 




00 




75 


I 


00 


2 


75 


2 


50 


3 


00 


3 


00 


2 


50 


2 


75 


3 


25 


3 


75 


I 


10 


I 


00 


I 


25 



Watering Pots. 

4 Quarts, Japanned, Screw Tops — 35 

6 " '■' " „ 40 

§ " '' t- , , 50 

10 " '' '' '. 65 

12 '' "^ "- _... „ 75 

i5 '' «' " .„.. 90 

Extra Heavy fhand made) No. i, 20 Quarts - 2 00 

No. 2, 16 " , 175 

" " " No. 3, 14 " I 50 

" '* No. 4, 10 '^ - 125 

" " ''' No. 5, 8 " 100 

The latter are madeof the best material,and have very fine rose heads; they are made by 
a mechanic who has been furnishing the vegetable gardeners for years with these pots, and 
has improved upon them until they are perfect for the purpose. 

Miscellaneous. 

The Perfection Broadcast Hand Seed Sower, Everetts 2 25 

The Granger " " " '' 450 

Excelsior Weeding Hooks 10 

American Transplanting Trowels, 5, 6 and 7 inches loc. to 15 

Diston's Transplanting Trowels (solid shank) 6 inch 40c.; 7 inch 45 

Transplanting Forks (sieel) No. 22 , 20 

" " (Malleable Iron) No. 21 - 15 

Lang's Hand Weeder -.- 25 

Diston's 10 inch Flat Files 25 

" 12 inch •' 35 

Grafting Wax, [Lion Brand] Best Quality per lb. 40c.; per % lb. 15 

French Whetstones .'. 15 

Hammer and Anvil for beating French Scythes - l 50 

Raffia, [for tying] per -4- lb. loc; per lb. 30 



RICHARD FROTSCHl^R S^BD CO., I/td. 



145 



C. M. SORIA, I'KESIDENT. JNO. S. KAINEY, ViCE-PrkSIDENT. OHAS. RAINEY, Secretaey. 



STANDARD 




P. 0. Drawer 442, 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



no and Chemical 

Manufacturing Co., 

:Z14 UNION ST., 

^ ..^^New Orleans, La. 



-^«^®@\^(^\©®>a<^ 



^tgf? ®rabe 








er 




izers 



poiy SuqqlP Cane, 

Cotton and Coi^n, 
Vegetables, 
Rice, Oats, 
ppuit Tt^ees, Etc. 

Special Branbs axxb ^ovmnla 
for tl^c CrucR (Barben. 



%mfi 



imi 






i 



I 




«'((M)''(f 



I 



I 



w 






\{!m(m(m,mu 






Will make any Special (Brabe of ^^rttlizer Destreb, 



14G Tun Sn'^'D ANNUAIv OF THE 



How to 




Our Terms are strictly Cash, which must accompany all orders. 
C. O. I>. No seed sent C O. D., unless One Third of the amount of pur- 
chase is sent with the order 

In ordering be sure, name, address and order is plainly written. We 

have received many letters which could not be read, some without name 
and to others w^ith no address. Don't fail togive your^Post Office address, and if 
shipping by Kxpress, nearest Express Office, b}' Freight, Rail Road station or by Boat, 
your landing. 

How to send Money. In remitting, send Post Office or Express Money Order, 
Draft or Check on New Orleans or New York;or by Registered Letter. If individual checks 
are sent on local bank, 15 cents must be added to amount of invoice to cover cost of col- 
lection. 

Seeds by Mail. Seeds can be sent by mail to any part of the United States in 
packages "Not Exceeding Four Pounds", at eight cents per pound, or one cent for 
two ounces or fraction thereof. On seeds ordered in papers or by the ounce and not more 
than one pound, of each variety, we prepay the postage, except on Beans, Peas and Corn 
on which postage amounts to fifteen cents per quart. 

By special arrangements which we have v»'ith the different Express Companies in our 
city we are enabled to' send out Express Packages at the regular Postal rate which is 
eight cents per pound, for larger packages often pounds and over a special rate has been 
granted us, bringing the charges even below postal rate. Express charges have to be pre- 
paid at the shipping point. When you v.'ish to have advantage of this rate by Express 
add 8 cents per pound. Our packages are put up in the rcost careful manner, and every 
precaution is taken to insure their reaching their destination in safety. Purchasers living 
at anj^ place where our seeds are not sold, are requested to write to us and obtain their 
supplies direct. 

Our special Offers. On receipt of One Dollar, we will mail to any part of the 
United States, postpaid, F'lf teen large papers of assorted vegetable seeds, or Twenty-five 
smaller sized papers. The selection can be made from this catalogvie and ma}' contain 
among this number Four papers of either Beans. Peas or Corn, or may be left to us, in 
which case we will select only such varieties as to our knowledge will suit that particular 
section of the country and the season. 

Of Flower seeds, except such varieties where special prices are given in our catalogue 
we offer Twenty papers, postpaid for One Dollar; Bulbs which are too heavy are not in- 
cluded in this offer. On Bulbs eight cents on every pound extra will be charged for 
postage. 

To Merchants in the Country, in order to enable them to handle our seeds we will 
offer special inducements, but will send out no seeds on commission, because we want to keep 
before you nothing but strictly fresli and reliable seeds. Seed Merchants, who give 
their seed out on commission, rarely collect that which is not sold more than once a 
year, and as in our southern climate many varieties if kept over summer will loose their 
vitality, this seed must be thrown away or mixed in with new seed, and in either case the 
purchaser is the loser ; first, because if thrown away it necessarily increases the cost of 
the seed as this has to be added to the selling price, and if mixed in with new seed you 
lose the cost of labor and time in planting seed which will not properly germinate. 
vSending out seed to merchants as we do, they take their own risk, consequentl}^ are con- 
servative in ordering and have no more reason to have old seed, than old rice or an old 
stock of goods generally ; and by this system we are enabled to put a much larger quantity 
of seed in papers than you find in commission papers. Many a reliable merchant who 
sells commission seed, sows our seed to produce vegetables for his own use. A certain proof 
of the superioritj^ of our seeds. 



RICHARD FROTSCHER SEED CO., LimiTKD. 



Hard 



soHor Seed 

PRICE LIST 1897 



We mean 1)}' the following reduction on our price list to give our customers 
the advantage of the lowest possible prices on Pirst-Class Seeds. We list the same 
fine strains sold by the late Richard Frotscher, which are grown from carefully 
selected stock by the same experienced and reliable growers, with a few varieties 
on our Specialty Sheets, which are worthy of your attention and deserve much 
space in your gardens. We have the liveliest interest in the success of the Southern 
farmers and gardeners, and shall esteem it a great favor if you will co-operate by report- 
ing your success with our seeds, and advise us of any good sort, which you have tried 
and found worthy of a place on your farm or in your garden, which is not listed herel 

©ur Motto: **THE BEST IS eHEaPEST.*» 



\/^.A.I9l 



I 



Artichoke — 

Large Green Globe 

Plants, per 100, $1.50; 1000, $14.00 

Asparagus — 

Conover's Colossal 

Palmetto 

White Columbian Mammoth... 

Roots— 

Conover's Colossal 

Palmetto 

White Columbian Mammoth 

Beans — Dwarf, Snap or Bush 

Extra Early Refugee 

Pride of Newton • 

Early Mohawk Six Weeks bjo 

Early Yellow Six Weeks | 

Thorburn's Prolific Market o 

W^hite Kidney ^ 

Red Kidney ^ 

Best of All ^ 

Improved Valentine a 

Improved Prolific Dwarf German Wax (striugless) cr 

Grenell's Improved Dwarf Golden Wax u 

Wardwell's Dwarf Kidney Wax (x 

Dwarf Flageolet or Perfection Wax ^ 

Detroit Rust Proof Wax , C 

Henderson's Bush Lima o 

Burpee's Bush Lima JJ3 

Beans — Pole or Running r^ 

Large Lima '^ 

Carolina or Sewee ., 

Frotscher Co.'s Southern Willow-leaved ^ 

Dutch Case Knife, White Q 

Southern Prolific ;^ 

Crease Back, White W 

Lazy Wife's .^ 

Golden Wax Flageolet 

Beans — Engi^ish 

Broad Windsor 

Beet- 
Extra Early or Bassano 

Dewing's Early Red Turnip 

Early Blood Turnip 

Long Blood 

Half Long Blood 

Edmonds' Early Blood Turnip .: 

Crosby's Egyptian Turnip 



'rEc^^s 



Per Ounce 


Per 'X R). 


Per Tb. 


|0 50 


|1 75 


$5 00 


10 


20 


50 


10 


25 


75 


10 


30 


1 00 


100 Roots 


1000 Roots 




|0 75 


$6 00 




75 


6 00 




1 00 


8 00 




Per Quart 


Per Peck 


Per Bushel 


$0 20 


$1 15 


$3 75 


20 


1 15 


4 50 


15 


1 00 


3 50 


15 


1 15 


3 75 


20 


1 50 


5 00 


15 


1 00 


3 50 


15 


1 00 


3 50 


20 


1 25 


4 00 


20 


1 00 


3 75 


20 


1 25 


4 25 


20 


1 25 


3 75 


20 


1 25 


4 25 


20 


1 50 


5 00 


20 


1 25 


4 00 


30 


1 50 


5 50 


40 


2 50 


9 00 


30 


2 00 


7 00 


30 


2 00 


6 50 


30 


2 00 


6 50 


30 


1 50 


5 50 


30 


2 00 


5 75 


30 


2 00 


5 75 


30 


2 00 


6 00 


30 


2 00 


6 50 


15 


1 00 


4 00 


Per Ounce 


Per X lb. 


Per ft. 


$0 10 


|0 15 


$0 45 


10 


15 


45 


10 


15 


45 


10 


15 


45 


10 


20 


50 


10 


20 


50 


15 


20 


50 



If you would reap the reward of industry and honest toil, plant Good Seed 



THE SEED ANNUAL OF THE 



\^^K¥9 



Beet — CoxTiNUED 

Egyptian Red Turnip 

Eclipse --. 

Stinson 's Improved....... „.., 

Lentz ,,... - 

Long Red Mangel "Wurzel 

"White French or Sugar 

Silver or Swiss Chard 

Borecole or Curled Kale — 

Dwarf German Greens.-. 

Broccoli — Purple Cape 

Brussels Sprouts 

Cabbage — 

Early York 

Earl}- Large York -,--.-:-4.: - 

Early Large Oxheart ...1:'.. 

Early AVinningstadt 

Jersev Wakefield 

Early Flat Dutch 

Early Drumhead 

Stein's Early Large Flat Dutch (very fine)... 

Solid South 

Finke's Succession 

Large Flat Brunswick 

Improved Large Late Drumhead 

Frotscher's Superior Large Late Flat Dutch. 

Crescent City Large Late Flat Dutch 

Improved Early Summer 

Red Dutch (for pickling) 

Green Globe Savoy 

Early Dwarf Savoy 

Drumhead Savoy 

St. Denis or Chou Bonneuil 

Cauliflower — 

Extra Early Paris 

Half Early Paris 

Early Erfurt 

EarU' Snowball 

LeNormand's (short -stemmed) 

Early Italian Giant 

Late Italian Giant 

Large Algiers (fine) 

Carrots — 

Early Scarlet Horn 

Half Long Scarlet French 

Half Long Luc ....' 

Improved Long Orange 

Long Red (without core) 

St. Valerie... 

Danver's Intermediate 

Chantenay Half Long 

Celery — 

Large W^hite Solid 

Perfection Heartwell 

Dwarf Large Ribbed 

Golden Self-Blanching (very fine) 

Giant Pascal 

White Plume 

Celeriac or Turnip-Rooted 

Cutting or Soup 

Chervil — Plain-leaved 

Collards 

Corn Salad 



Per Ounce 
$0 10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 

15 
30 
15 



Per H ft, 
SO 20 
20 
20 
20 
15 
15 
20 

40 

1 25 

50 



Per ft. 
SO 50 

50 

50 

50 

35 

40 

60 

1 00 
4 00 - 
1 50 "^^^ 



20 


50 


1 50 


20 


50 


1 50 


20 


50 


1 50 


20 


50 


1 50 


25 


75 


2 50 


20 


50 


1 75 


20 


50 


1 75 


25 


65 


2 50 


25 


65 


2 50 


20 


65 


2 50 


25 


65 


2 50 


25 


65 


2 50 


25 


65 


2 50 


25 


65 


2 50 


25 


65 


2 50 


20 


50 


1 75 


20 


50 


1 75 


20 


50 


1 75 


20 


50 


1 75 


20 


50 


1 75 


75 


2 50 


10 00 


75 


2 50 


8 00 


75 


2 50 


10 00 


2 00 


6 00 


20 00 


75 


2 50 


10 00 


1 00 


3 00 


12 00 


1 00 


3 00 


12 00 


1 00 


3 00 


12 00 


10 


25 


80 


10 


25 


80 


10 


25 


80 


10 


25 


60 


10 


25 


80 


10 


25 


80 


10 


25 


60 


10 


25 


80 


20 


60 


2 00 


30 ^ 


75 


3 00 


25 


75 


2 50 


35 


1 00 


3 50 


25 


75 


2 50 


25 


75 


2 50 


15 


50 


1 50 


10 


30 


1 00 


15 


50 


1 50 


15 


40 


1 00 


15 


40 


1 00 



RICHARD FROTSCHER SEED CO., Limited. 



>//MR 



Corn — 

Extra Early Dwarf Sugar 

Adam's Extra Early ^ 

Adam's Early (large) (X 

Early Sugar or Sweet ...^ 6 

Stowel's Evergreen Sugar ... g ^ 

Golden Beauty ... ^ tn 

Champion White Pearl 1^ g. 

Golden Dent Gourd Seed r^ u -I 

Early Yellow Canada ^ ° 

Large White Flint ^t: 



Blunt's Prolific, Field -3 § 

Improved Leaming g ^ 

Mosby's Prolific >-, 

Hickory King, White « 

White Rockdale 

Yellow Creole Corn 

Cress — 

Curled or Pepper Grass 

Broad- leaved (grey -seeded) 

Water Cress (true) 

Cucumber — 

Improved Early White Spine 

New Orleans Market 

Early Frame 

Dong Green Turke}' 

Early Cluster 

Gherkin or Burr (for pickling) 

Eggplant— 

Darge Purple or New Orleans Market 

New York Market (thornless) 

Endive — 

Green Curled 

Extra Fine Curled 

Broad-leaved or Escarolle 

Garlic per quart, 20c; per gallon, 75c 

Kohlrabi — 

Early White Vienna (finest) 

Early White Vienna (tall growing) 

Leek — 

Large London Flag, American grown 

Large Carentan, American grown 

Lettuce-r 

Early Cabbage or White Butter 

Improved Royal Cabbage 

Brown Dutch 

Drumhead Cabbage 

White Paris Cos 

Perpignan 

New Orleans Improved Large Passion (true) 

Trocadero (imported) 

Melon — Musk or Cantei^oupe 

Netted Nutmeg 

Netted Citron 

Pine Apple 

Early White Japan 

Persian or Cassaba 

New Orleans Market (true) 

Osage ■ 

Early Hackensack 

Emerald Gem 

Long Island Beauty 



Per Quart 
$0 20 

20 

20 

20 

20 

15 

15 

15 

15 

15 

15 

15 

15 

15 

15 

15 
Per Ounce 
$0 10 

15 

50 

10 
15 
10 
10 
10 
20 

40 
35 

20 
20 
20 



25 
20 

20 
25 

15 
15 
15 
15 
20 
20 
20 
20 

10 
10 
10 
15 
15 
15 
15 
10 
15 
15 



Per Peck 

$1 00 
75 
75 
75 
75 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

Per X R>- 

$0 35 

60 

1 50 

20 
30 
20 
25 
20 
50 



50 
00 

65 
65 
65 



00 
60 

50 
60 

40 
50 
50 
40 
50 
50 
65 
50 

25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
30 
30 
25 
30 
30 



Per Bushel 

$2 75 



50 
50 

50 
50 

75 
75 



1 75 
1 75 
1 75 

1 75 



75 
75 
75 



1 75 

1 75 
Per lb, 

|1 00 

2 00 
5 00 

50 
1 00 
50 
75 
50 
1 50 

4 50 

3 50 



00 
00 
00 



3 00 

1 75 

1 50 

2 00 



25 
50 
50 
25 
50 
50 
50 
50 

75 
75 
75 
75 
75 
00 
00 
75 
00 
00 



THE SEED ANNUAL OF THE 



'V.A.I 



nc^^ 



O 01 

Co 

C u 
U O 

O 3 
03 «2 



IVIelon — Watkr 

Ice Cream (white -seeded) 

Rattlesnake (true)..: 

Pride of Georgia 

Mammoth Iron-Clad 

Kolb Gem _. 

Florida's Favorite 

Seminole 

Lone Star (fine) 

Duke Jones 

Mustard — Large Curled (Giant Southern) 

Chinese Large-leaved :. 

White or Yellow Seeded 

Nasturtium— Tall 

Dwarf 

Okra — Green Tall Growing 

Extra Early Dwarf Green Prolific 

White Velvet 

Onion — Creole — Price given on application 

Bermuda (true) Red and White 

Italian Onion — New Queen 

Onion Sets — 

White 

Red or Yellow 

Shallots 

Parsley — 

Plain -leaved 

Double Curled '. 

Improved Garnishing 

Parsnip — Hollow Crown or Sugar 

Peas — 

Extra Early (first and best) 

Early Alaska ^ 

Tom Thumb ^ 

Early Washington --^ 

Blue Beauty g^ 

Laxton's Alpha ;_ 

Bishop's Dwarf Long Pod ^ 

Champion of England -^j 

Carter's Stratagem ^ 

Carter's Telephone o" 

McLean's Advancer ^ 

McLean's Little Gem... a 

Laxton's Prolific Long Pod o 

Eugenie ^ 

Dwarf Blue Imperial tj 

Royal Dwarf Marrow ^ 

Black- Eyed Marrowfat.. ^ 

Large White Marrowfat ■■■-■% 

Dwarf Sugar ^ 

Tall Sugar t>., 

American Wonder W 

Field or Cow Peas 

Pepper — 

Bell or Bull Nose 

Sweet Spanish Monstrous 

Long Red Cayenne 

Red Cherry 

Golden Dawn Mango 

Bird Eye 

Tabasco 

Chili 

Ruby King, Sweet 

Columbus, Sweet • 

Red Cluster 



Per it). 

$0 60 
60 




25 
25 

Per Quart 
$0 15 
15 
15 

Per Ounce 

$0 10 

10 

10 

10 

Per Quart 
$0 20 
20 
25 
20. 
25 
20 
20 
20 
30 
30 
25 

25 ■ 
25 
25 
20 
20 
15 
20 
30 
30 
30 

Per Ounce 

$0 30 
40 
25 
40 
30 
50 
50 
50 
25 
40 
50 



75 
75 
Per Peck 

Market Price 

gal. 50 
Per X 1^) • 

$0 20 

25 

25 

20 

Per Peck 

$1 25 



2 50 
2 50 
Per Bushel 



25 
25 
00 



1 50 



25 
25 



1 25 

2 00 



1 
1 
1 

2 
2 
1 

Market 



75 

50 

25 

25 
1 25 
1 25 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

75_ 

Price 



Per lb. 

$0 60 

75 

75 

60 

Per Bushel 

$4 00 

4 00 

4 75 



00 
75 
00 
00 
00 



Per % ft. 

$1 00 



00 
00 
00 
75 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
3 00 
6 25 
6 25 
5 50 



25 
00 
25 
00 
50 



1 50 
1 50 
75 
1 25 
1 50 



Per ft. 

$2 75 
4 00 

2 50 
4 00 

3 00 



3 00 

4 00 



RICHARD FROTSCHER SEED CO., Limited. 



VJ^RIE-riEi 



Po 

o 



V o 
X o 



tatoes — Choice Eastern Stock- 
Boston Peerless 

Rural New Yorker No. 2 

White Elephant 

Extra Early Vermont 

Vermont Early Rose 

Snowflake 

Improved Beauty of Hebron 
Pride of the South 



We have also as tine an assortment of choice Northern stock as has eve 
been offered — lower than above quotations. Prices on application, 



(Drayage oxfra)" 



Earl}^ Triumph, Tennessee grown ... 
Tiic Triiimplnire liighly recommpiidefi for early sliippiiig' 
Potatoes, Sweet — 

Spanish Yam 

Shanghai, Or California Yam 

Southern Queen 

Pumpkin Yams L... 

Prices vary accordiug to market, (luotatioiis given on application. 
Pumpkin — 

Kentucky Field • 

Large Cheese 

Cashaw Crook-Neck green -striped southern grown 

Golden Yellow Mammoth 

Radish — 

Early Long Scarlet 

Early Scarlet Turnip 

Golden Globe 

Early Scarlet Olive-shaped 

White Summer Turnip 

Scarlet Half Long French 

Scarlet Olive-shaped, (White Tipped) or French 
Breakfast :: 

Black Spanish (Winter) 

Chinese Rose (Winter) ' 

Chartier r.. 

White Strasburg ■ : 

White California Mammoth 

Roquette 

Rhubarb or Pie Plant Roots, 20c. each ; per doz. $1.75 

Salsify — Sandwich Island (Mammoth) 

Sorrel — Broad-leaved 

Spinach — 

Extra Large-leaved Savoy 

Broad-leaved Flanders 

Squash — 

Early Bush or Patty Pan 

Long Green or Summer Crook-Neck 

The Hubbard 

Boston Marrow 

Tobacco — 

Havana 

Sumatra 

Connecticut Seed-leaf 

Tomato — 

King of the Earlies 

Extra Early Dwarf Red ..^.. j^j.^.:... 

Trophy (selected) .....f...!. 

Large Yellow 

Acme (Livingston's) , 

Paragon 

Livingston's Perfection 

Stone 

Livingston's Favorite 




Per Ounce 

$0 10 
10 
10 
10 

10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 

10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
15 
20 

20 
15 

10 
10 

10 
10 
10 
10 

40 
40 
20 

25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 



Per }i m. 

$0 20 

15 

25 

40 

20 
20 
25 
20 
20 
20 

20 

20 
30 
20 

25 
25 
75 

50 
50 



15 
15 

25 
25 
40 
40 

25 
25 
60 

75 
75 
75 
75 
75 
75 
75 
75 
75 



Per R). 

$0 50 
50 
75 

1 00 

40 
50 
60 
50 
60 
50 

60 
60 

75 
60 
75 
75 

2 00 

1 50 

1 50 

30 
30 

75 

75 

1 00 

1 00 

4 00 
4 00 

2 00 



50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 



THE SEED ANNUAL OF THE 



'rl^^^ 



Tomato — Continued 

Livingston's Beautv . 



o 



V 

> 



'■J 



PC 



Horsford's Prelude 

Dwarf Champion 

Large Stone 

Turnip — 

Early Red or Purple Top (strap-leaved) 

Early White Flat Dutch (strap-leaved) 

Large White Globe 

White Spring 

Yellow Aberdeen ^ 

Golden Ball 

Amber Globe 

Improved Purple Top Ruta Baga( Lone: island grown) 

Munich Early Purple Top 

Purple Top Globe 

Extra Early White Egg 

Sweet and Medicinal Herbs — 

Anise 

Balm ; 

Basil 

Bene ^ 

Borage ...:.... 

Carawav 

Dill ^ 



o 

o 



Fennel... 

Lavender 

Marjoram 

Port Marigold. 

Rosemary 

Rue. ' 



;vr' 



Sage 

Summer Savory 

Thyme 

Wormwood 

Grass and Field Seeds — 

. Red Clover (extra cleaned) 

White Dutch Clover 

Alsike Clover r*— — 

Alfalfa or French Lucerne 

Crimson (an annual) 

Lespedeza Striata or Japan Clover 

Kentucky Blue Grass (fancy) 

Red Top Grass (choice) 

English Rye Grass 

Rescue Grass 

Johnson Grass (extra cleaned) 

Tall Meadow Oat Grass 

Meadow Rescue Grass 

Orchard Grass (choice) 

Timothy 

German Millet ."] 

Texas Rye j 

Texas Barley |- 

Texas Red Rust Proof Oats 

Sorghum 

Kaffir Corn. White Market price 

Broom Corn 

Dhouro or Egyptian Corn 

Buckwheat 

Russian Sunflower 

Hairv Vetch 

Winter Vetch 

Teosinte 



Per Ounce 


Per % lb . 


Per lb. 


10 25 


10 75 


$2 50 


25 


75 


2 50 


25 


75 


2 50 


25 


75 


2 50 


10 


20 


50 


10 


20 


50 


10 


20 


50 


10 


20 


.50 


10 


20 


50 


10 


20 


50 


10 


20 


50 


lu 


20 


50 


10 


20 


60 


10 


20 


50 


10 


20 


50 


Per Pack. 






SO 10 






10 






10 






10 






10 






10 






10 






10 






10 






10 






10 






10 






10 






10 






10 

in 







Per 



10 

R), 

15 

25 

20 

15 

10 

20 

15 

15 

10 

30 

10 

25 

20 

20 

10 



10 
10 
10 
20 
15 
15 



Per y2 Bu. Per Bushel 
1 $ 7 00 



15 00 
10 00 

7 00 



S3 50 



00 
00 
50 
25 
00 
00 
50 
00 
50 
00 
50 



.Market Prir? 



50c. 



ft), 



Per lb. 

SI 25 



2 50 
2 00 

5 00 



f 




IJSTIDEiX:. 



Page, 

Almanac - 5 to i6 

Artichoke : 19 

Asparagus 19 

Beans, (Dwarf, Snap or Bush) 20 to 23 

Beans, (Pole or Running) 24 to 25 

Beans, English - 26 

Beets 26 to 28 

Borecole or Kale 28 

Broccoli 28 

Brussels Sprouts 28 

Broom Corn 93 

Bordeau Mixture 132 

Bulbous Roots 114 to 117 

Cabbage 29 to 33 

Cauliflower 33 to 35 

Carrots 35 to 37 

Celery 37 to 40 

Chervil 40 

Corn Salad 40 

Corn 40 to 44 

Cress 44 

Cucumber 44 to 45 

Citrus Trifoliata 129 

China Umbrella Tree. 131 

Chufas 132 

Cotton Seed 132 

Drainage and Cultivation 3 

Dhouro Corn 92 

Diseases of Potatoes T32 

Egg Plant 45 to 47 

Endive 47 

Extra Cleaned Bird Seed 131 

Farmers' Book on Grasses 83 

Frotscher Co.'s Lawn Grass Mixture ... 91 

Flower. Seeds 94 to 113 

Fruit Trees 118 to 126 

Farm and Garden Implements ...133 to 141 

Garlic 47 

Grasses. Forage Plants and Field 

Seeds .84 to 91 

German Millet 91 

Grape Vines 131 

Hot Bed 18 

How to order Garden Seed 146 

Hammond's Slug Shot 142 

Introduction i 

Japan Lilies ....117 to 118 

Japan Mammoth Chestnuts 129 

Japanese Walnuts 129 

Jerusalem Artichokes .131 

Kohlrabi 48 



Page. 

Kaffir Corn 92 

Kerosene Emulsion 142 

Leek 48 

Lettuce 48 to 50 

Louisiana Soft Shelled Pecans. ..126 to 128 

Melon, Musk 50 to 51 

Melon, Water 52 to 55 

Mustard 55 

Michel's Early Strawberry Plants 131 

Nasturtium 56 

Novelties and Specialties i to viii 

Okra 56 

Onion 57 to 59 

Oak Haven Seed Farm 2 

Orange Trees 129 

Parsley 59 

Parsnip 59 

Peas 59 to 63 

Pepper 63 to 65 

Potatoes 65 to 68 

Potatoes, Sweet 68 to 69 

Pumpkin ... 69 

Pratt's Poultry Food 131 

Price List of Garden Implements. .143 to 144 

Radish ,70 to 71 

Roquette 71 

Remarks on Sowing Vegetables for Ship- 
ping 3 

Rural Branching Sorghum 92 

Roots for Stock Food 96 

Sowing Seeds 17 

Standard Weight of Seed 17 

vSalsify 71 

Spinach 72 

Sorrel 72 

Squash 72 to 73 

Sweet and Medicinal Herbs 83 

Shallots 59 

Sorghum 92 

Spanish Peanuts 132 

Standard Guano Co 145 

Table Showing Quantity of Seed per 

Acre 4 

Tomato 73 to 74 

Turnip 79 to 82 

Tobacco Seed 83 

Teosinte 93 

Tobacco Dust 141 

Vegetable Garden 2 

Whale Oil Soap 142 

Zucker's Medicol Eggs 132 





N??52Ito525MMMHE5T. 









^^^^tSS/tu 



COMMUHlCfil'l 



P.O.DRAV# 
463 



MCKIHT & WAILE N.O.U 



SEED POTATOES 1^ CHOICE SEED CORN ASPE:ciALT>